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Prancer
07-23-2012, 05:56 PM
I know what you mean. When I break out the Frances the Badger or Amelia Bedelia books, kids today say "meh..." :fragile:

I don't remember most of what my mother read to me, but I never heard the end of how many times I made her read this folk tale (http://www.authorama.com/english-fairy-tales-6.html). My mom held a grudge about that one until the day she died, which I thought was silly until I ran into Go, Dog, Go. I may never forgive my kids for that one, either.

We had a set of My Book House (http://www.amazon.com/My-Book-House-Volumes-1-12/dp/9990409455) and I know she read to me from those a lot. She kept them so I could read them to my kids. Not only were my kids meh, but, erm, so was I when I read them again. The copyright on our set is 1920; good lord, there was a lot of dull children's lit around then.

Wyliefan
07-23-2012, 06:18 PM
My favorite book to read to Mini was/is Pete The Cat (http://www.bookdepository.com/book/9780061906220?redirected=true&selectCurrency=USD&gclid=CJKi9uWRrrECFQQaQgodUy4Aqg )

I just sent that one to my godson! I'm told it was a big hit.

Nan
07-23-2012, 07:00 PM
I just finished Safe at Home by Richard Doster. It's about desegregation in the early 1950's as it relates to a minor league baseball team in a small southern town as told through the experience and mind of the sports writer of the local newspaper, a man who loves baseball. I found the writing rich and satisfying and the central characters, specifically the sportswriter, people who interest you and make you want to know more about them.

This one gets a thumbs up from me. :)

Wyliefan
07-23-2012, 07:19 PM
I just finished Safe at Home by Richard Doster. It's about desegregation in the early 1950's as it relates to a minor league baseball team in a small southern town as told through the experience and mind of the sports writer of the local newspaper, a man who loves baseball. I found the writing rich and satisfying and the central characters, specifically the sportswriter, people who interest you and make you want to know more about them.

This one gets a thumbs up from me. :)

That was a good one indeed. I've heard there was a sequel, but haven't yet gotten hold of it.

rjblue
07-23-2012, 07:40 PM
I don't remember most of what my mother read to me, but I never heard the end of how many times I made her read this folk tale (http://www.authorama.com/english-fairy-tales-6.html). My mom held a grudge about that one until the day she died, which I thought was silly until I ran into Go, Dog, Go. I may never forgive my kids for that one, either.
"Do you like my hat?" is a meme around my house. I loved every Seuss book.

I didn't like reading the Frances books or the Richard Scary ones.

gkelly
07-23-2012, 08:01 PM
"Do you like my hat?" is a meme around my house.

Me too. I mean, I use it often, whenever a conversation starts "Hello again." "Hello."
I'm a single adult. I don't know if my sisters or their kids have it stuck in their heads the same way.

Prancer
07-23-2012, 09:00 PM
"Do you like my hat?"

:drama: Haven't I suffered enough? :scream::scream::scream:

IceAlisa
07-23-2012, 09:17 PM
I just sent that one to my godson! I'm told it was a big hit.

It's a big hit with me! :P I am considering buying another one for Mini, although he is probably too old for it now. But I have alterior motives. :sekret:

Finished Rules of civility--overall rather enjoyable, especially if you like NYC.

Started Grotesque by Natsuo Kirino. She just sucks you in. Is there a Black Hole award? I nominate her.

BrokenAnkle
07-23-2012, 10:31 PM
A little something for people who read picture books to children: http://entertainment.time.com/2012/07/18/hating-ms-maisy-the-joy-sorrow-and-neurotic-rage-of-reading-to-your-children/

Go, Dog, Go and Are You My Mother? still induce hives when I see their covers.

It is funny what are crazy making books for parents. I love these 2 both as a parent and a librarian who reads them at storytime. The only book my kids loved that "got lost" was a bizarre book called Gear Bear, which I really did throw away in the dumpster at midnight. I also find Robert Munsch and Shel Silversteins stories unbearable, but a lot of parents love them. Can't remember any kids asking for them now that I think of it...
But I love all things Suess/Giesel/Lesig, also things by Al Perkins and PD Eastman. In fact, I still want to call steam shovels "Snorts" when I see them :)

As a children's librarian, I still see a lot of interest in older books like Amelia Bedelia and Frances as well, but also in Pete the Cat and the awesome Mo Willems' Pigeon books and Elephant and Piggie books, all of which I can read out loud over and over either to individuals or groups.

rjblue
07-24-2012, 03:39 AM
I also find Robert Munsch and Shel Silversteins stories unbearable, but a lot of parents love them. Can't remember any kids asking for them now that I think of it...
My sister gave The Giving Tree to my son when he was 4. I got three quarters of the way through the book when he began to wail with grief. It was horrifying to him (and me). Robert Munsch was tolerable to read, but I didn't save any of them to read to my grandkids.

Nomad
07-24-2012, 04:02 AM
Finished Angel after dinner, then watched the movie. It was mostly faithful to the book, although they softened Angel's character too much. One point that the film missed completely was that if Angel had not been so conceited and arrogant and unwilling to take advice, she could have become the critically acclaimed novelist she dreamed of being instead of a ridiculous, bestselling hack. Now I am reading Rosamond Lehmann's Invitation to the Waltz.

IceAlisa
07-25-2012, 06:56 AM
Has anyone read the Kurt Wollander mystery series? It keeps being mentioned after the weekly Maigret broadcast as part of their International Mystery series.

If yes, would you recommend the series?

galaxygirl
07-25-2012, 07:00 AM
I haven't read the books but I've seen a couple of the shows on PBS and it was good but, like most Scandinavian literature that I've read, kind of dreary.

IceAlisa
07-25-2012, 07:15 AM
Well, they don't get a lot of sun up there. :shuffle:

My exposure to Scandinavian literature is limited to Astrid Lindgren, Selma Lagerlof, Hans Christian Andersen and Stieg Larsson but I didn't find them dreary at all. May be it's all relative.

Zemgirl
07-25-2012, 08:24 AM
My exposure to Scandinavian literature is limited to Astrid Lindgren, Selma Lagerlof, Hans Christian Andersen and Stieg Larsson but I didn't find them dreary at all. May be it's all relative.
Well, not dreary, but Lindgren's The Brothers Lionheart starts with the main characters dying - not exactly cheerful.