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zaphyre14
02-17-2012, 12:51 PM
I read "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" a while back, and while I don't remember loving the book, the fact that I do remember reading it at all is enough to make me check out "Unholy Night" out of curiosity. And I do have a B&N gift card..... :)

Beverly's "Scandalous Countess" is typical historical romance. The heroine is an empty-headed spoiled rich beauty on the hunt for a wealthy titled husband, the hero is a poor, scarred Naval war hero; they have nothing in common, don't even like each other and yet, in the course of one meeting, he falls madly in love with her. Pertty much what I expected. The only sad thing for me is Beverly's afterword where she describes how she developed her marvelous fresh ideas for characters and plot. Uhm, nothing marvelous and fresh - and Mary Jo Putney does it better anyway.

But after Tolkein's droning saga, "Countess" is like ice cream after a bland heavy meal.

LilJen
02-17-2012, 03:11 PM
Definitely one of my favorite books. At least the parts about Anna and Count Vronsky.

Really? I was fed up with Anna. Just so volatile (bipolar maybe?). I kept wanting her to get a grip and not have her emotions turn dramatically on a dime.

emason
02-17-2012, 04:14 PM
I have never successfully gotten past page 40 or so of Anna Karenina; I reach that point and decide I really don't want to spend 5 more minutes in the company of any of those people. I've tried, I really have; I know so many people who love this book and I just cannot get into it. Does anyone have a particular English translation to recommend above all the others?

galaxygirl
02-17-2012, 05:05 PM
I have never successfully gotten past page 40 or so of Anna Karenina; I reach that point and decide I really don't want to spend 5 more minutes in the company of any of those people. I've tried, I really have; I know so many people who love this book and I just cannot get into it. Does anyone have a particular English translation to recommend above all the others?

I'm reading the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation.

rfisher
02-17-2012, 05:15 PM
I've discovered a delightful English mystery writer: Cathrine Aird. Her novels are a cross between cozies and police procedurals. The are witty and her plotting is so good you really don't know who did it until the end. I just discovered how to electrocute someone with an ironing board. :sekret:

I just finished an old Hamish McBeth novel by MC Beaton: Death of a Traveler. I love her McBeth books and hate her Agatha Raisin series. Go figure.

Nomad
02-17-2012, 05:18 PM
I thought the Agatha Raisin books were kind of stupid. I gave up halfway through the third one.

rfisher
02-17-2012, 05:53 PM
I thought the Agatha Raisin books were kind of stupid. I gave up halfway through the third one.

The best part of the Hamish series is you get to know all the townspeople and other characters. They remind me of Alexander McCall's No1 Ladies Detective series. Speaking of which, there is a new book in that series coming out in a couple of months. :cheer2: I love Ma Ramotswe and I really love the audio books. The narrator is absolutely wonderful.

Artemis@BC
02-17-2012, 06:34 PM
I just finished an old Hamish McBeth novel by MC Beaton: Death of a Traveler. I love her McBeth books and hate her Agatha Raisin series. Go figure.

You are not alone there. Hamish rules, Agatha ... not so much.

(As an aside, the hardest thing for me in watching Once Upon a Time is the uglifying makeup they put on Robert Carlisle -- such a difference from his drop-dead-gorgeousness as Hamish. :swoon:)

I'll keep an eye out for Cathrine Aird. I'm always looking for new British mysteries. Tho' I'm still working my way through Deborah Crombie, after initially starting the series out of order.

rfisher
02-17-2012, 06:36 PM
You are not alone there. Hamish rules, Agatha ... not so much.

(As an aside, the hardest thing for me in watching Once Upon a Time is the uglifying makeup they put on Robert Carlisle -- such a difference from his drop-dead-gorgeousness as Hamish. :swoon:)

I'll keep an eye out for Cathrine Aird. I'm always looking for new British mysteries. Tho' I'm still working my way through Deborah Crombie, after initially starting the series out of order.

Aird isn't new. She was just new to me. :) But, I've really enjoyed her work.

Artemis@BC
02-17-2012, 07:06 PM
^ New to me = new, as far as I'm concerned. :cool:

Have you read any Aline Templeton? She's my new favourite. They're police procedurals, but set in a farming & fishing area of western Scotland so they don't have the same hard urban edge as a lot of others of the genre. As an added twist, the protagonist has a happy & stable family life -- that's not something you see very often with police detectives!

Nan
02-17-2012, 08:27 PM
(As an aside, the hardest thing for me in watching Once Upon a Time is the uglifying makeup they put on Robert Carlisle -- such a difference from his drop-dead-gorgeousness as Hamish. :swoon:)

Excuse me for a moment...

What?? Where?? Can I get it?? :D

rfisher
02-17-2012, 08:34 PM
^ New to me = new, as far as I'm concerned. :cool:

Have you read any Aline Templeton? She's my new favourite. They're police procedurals, but set in a farming & fishing area of western Scotland so they don't have the same hard urban edge as a lot of others of the genre. As an added twist, the protagonist has a happy & stable family life -- that's not something you see very often with police detectives!

No, but I'll look for her. I'll see if the library has any audio books first.

Prancer
02-17-2012, 09:03 PM
Aird isn't new. She was just new to me. :) But, I've really enjoyed her work.

:lol: Catherine Aird is definitely not new. I read some of her books when I was in high school.

I like Hamish and Agatha :shuffle:.


I love that book. I think I read it in two days.

I like the book and I am amazed at how suspenseful it is, given that we all know the outcome, but I am sometimes annoyed by an overly slangy phrase. Bill Clinton insisted on getting up in Teddy Kennedy's grille? Really?

Artemis@BC
02-17-2012, 10:18 PM
Excuse me for a moment...

What?? Where?? Can I get it?? :D

Is that a question about the TV version of Hamish Macbeth? It was 3 seasons of 6 episodes each, made in the late 90s. Completely brilliant, IMO. Some of the stories were right out of the books, other stories (and characters) were written fresh, but the "feel" was genuine throughout. Aside from Carlyle as Hamish, it also starred the always wonderful Shirley Henderson.

Hamish Macbeth (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111993/)

It's available on DVD; don't know about Netflix.

On my last trip to Scotland I made a detour to visit Plockton, the village where most of the series was shot. :D

Nan
02-17-2012, 10:37 PM
It was 3 seasons of 6 episodes each, made in the late 90s. Completely brilliant, IMO. Some of the stories were right out of the books, other stories (and characters) were written fresh, but the "feel" was genuine throughout. Aside from Carlyle as Hamish, it also starred the always wonderful Shirley Henderson.

Hamish Macbeth (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111993/)

It's available on DVD; don't know about Netflix.

Thank you. :)