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Wyliefan
06-26-2012, 08:06 PM
He has fans?

Having once waited literally hours in an autograph line that stretched around the bookstore and out the door, I can confirm that yes, he has fans. :) (It was well worth the wait, BTW.)

And yes, I'm an English major.

Prancer
06-26-2012, 08:57 PM
OK, off the top of my head:
Harry Potter
His Dark Materials
Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay
American Gods (fave book ever)
Three Musketeers

Not my kind of books, generally, but I know there are fans of all those here.

I have a friend who teaches fantasy and SF; I'll see if she has recommendations. She always recommends Lois McMaster Bujold, so I'll just throw that one out there now :).


I'm surprised you say there are English majors who enjoy Fforde's books. I thought they needed to be better edited and the characters were weak. Some interesting ideas, for sure, but very badly written/edited.

I think a lot of English majors enjoy all the literary references and jokes. English majors spend a lot of their time laughing at jokes and making references other people don't get. :shuffle:

Wyliefan
06-26-2012, 09:12 PM
I'm embarrassed to say I don't get half of Fforde's literary references. :o I need to go to English Major Reform School. But I really enjoy the ones I do get.

PDilemma
06-26-2012, 09:18 PM
I didn't care for the Thursday Next books myself. I thought the concept of the first one was interesting and I wanted to like them but after two or three, I just gave up. So there's another English major's thumbs down.


I was also an English major. I tried to read one Thursday Next book. I couldn't get through it. I think I made it through two chapters.

Ajax
06-26-2012, 09:23 PM
I was also an English major. I tried to read one Thursday Next book. I couldn't get through it. I think I made it through two chapters.

Haha, definitely seems like a divisive book, among English majors and others alike! My opinion was that the literary references (and a lot of the other plotlines) seemed thrown in there not because they add anything to the books but just to show off the author's cleverness.

Wyliefan
06-26-2012, 09:42 PM
To each her own, but I confess I honestly don't see how one could get that from Fforde's work. The books are all about books. All those references and jokes and plots are woven into its very fabric; there's nothing extraneous or artificial about them.

Prancer
06-26-2012, 11:05 PM
I'm embarrassed to say I don't get half of Fforde's literary references. :o I need to go to English Major Reform School. But I really enjoy the ones I do get.

:lol: If there were such a place, I would have been sent there already. I wasn't a lit major and never had a particular inclination to read literary works on my own time, so there are some massive gaps in my reading history. I also don't understand a lot of education-speak. When I attend department meetings, I usually look like this :confused: because I don't know what the heck anyone is saying.

PrincessLeppard
06-27-2012, 12:59 AM
You don't know what core compentencies or essential learnings are?

I don't really either

rfisher
06-27-2012, 01:30 AM
Ack! No education-speak. :scream: :yikes:


I've read 7/8 of Craig Johnson's Longmier series. No. 7 is a bit self-indulgent on CJ's part and doesn't have the same humor as the other books, but it's hard to keep things going in 7 books. Hopefully, 8 will be back to amusing rather than using Dante's Inferno as the underlying theme.

I started listening to Flashback by Dan Simmons on a long 10 hour drive this weekend. It's annoying, scary, prophetic and interesting all at the same time. The only real issue is Simmon's need to restate the "reason everything happened" multiple times. He's made the point and can just get on with solving the mystery 2/3 of the way through the book.

Prancer
06-27-2012, 01:53 AM
You don't know what core compentencies or essential learnings are?

I don't really either

I am pretty sure most people don't

I am still proud of myself for figuring out that "diversified discourse communities" means "students in other majors" at a faculty meeting last year.

It's sort of like talking about deconstructionism. I get the basic idea, but I don't understand a word anyone is saying about it most of the time.

Back to books--has anyone read Emily Arsenault's books? A friend who sometimes makes good recommendations just told me I would like them.

PDilemma
06-27-2012, 02:36 AM
Haha, definitely seems like a divisive book, among English majors and others alike! My opinion was that the literary references (and a lot of the other plotlines) seemed thrown in there not because they add anything to the books but just to show off the author's cleverness.

Exactly. It came off as "aren't I a clever English major?" to me. And I didn't like those people when I was in class with them.

IceAlisa
06-27-2012, 03:00 AM
I am really into JCO Bellefleur. Seems like whenever I have a bad reading experience, I run home to literary mama, JCO.
The writing is characteristically powerful. Somehow I can deal with her subtle and occasionally not so subtle creepiness vs. flat out violence in other books. I think her excellent prose has a lot to do with it, plus the creepiness is part of the bigger picture.

Anyway, so far two things: this book contains a horse racing scene that is at least as good as one in Anna Karenina, although the symbolism of it does echo Tolstoi. Also, I think that she may have borrowed the idea of a woman scorned raising a girl to become her weapon against men and the world in general, but men in particular from a certain British writer (;) Wyliefan). But so what. This is great reading.

Spinner
06-27-2012, 03:54 AM
On a flying trip through B&N last week, I picked up two books by Carol K. Carr because the covers promised mysteries about a Victorian madam. I opened the first one, "India Black" last night and could not put it down. The first line is "My name is India Black. I am a whore." :) She goes on to say that if you've bought the book looking for secrets of the trade, you should return it. By then end of the first 10 pages, I was hooked. I only wish I had the time this week to curl up and devour the story, which concerns the sudden death of a VIP in one of India's upstairs rooms and a mysterious gentleman charged with finding VIP's briefcase that vanished when he died.

There's a second volume published, "India Black and the Widow of Windsor" and a third due in December. Great literature it isn't but so far, it's pretty decent entertaiment.

I have a friend who also read India Black and loved it for the same reasons you noted.

ryanbfan
06-27-2012, 06:51 AM
Uh oh. ITA about Shanghai Girls and Dreams of Joy. What was frustrating about Peony in Love?

She died before she could marry him. LOL. And if that wasn't enough, then he married the mean cousin!

I just bought The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh and All the Flowers in Shanghai.

I read incredibly fast (I finished 50 Shades of Grey, a 514 page book, in less than 24 hours... and FTR, it was awful) so I'm hoping the fact I bought TWO books this time instead of one holds me over.

IceAlisa
06-27-2012, 03:34 PM
She died before she could marry him. LOL. And if that wasn't enough, then he married the mean cousin!
Figures.