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my little pony
06-07-2012, 02:46 PM
just finished The Hare with Amber Eyes. the beginning part in paris was interesting but didnt really draw me in. but once the story got to vienna, it became much more compelling.

zaphyre14
06-08-2012, 03:18 PM
The ending of "Crystal Garden" felt rushed to me, and I really dislike books where the criminal is virtually unknown and unmentioned until the very end. But Quick isn't writing Great Literature and I liked the rest of the story well enough so I'm not too indignant this time.

In a change of genre, I started Phillipa Gregory's "Changeling." It reads like YA - or maybe early Ellis Peters - to me, but I do like the main characters so I'll continue onward. My only quibble is that it's set in Italy and I'm not getting any of that feel in the reading. I keep thinking it's England/Wales until I see the mention of Rome.

flyingsit
06-08-2012, 04:32 PM
I got a lot of books from the library all at once and now I don't know which to read first. I have:
The Leftovers (Tom Perrotta)
Divergent
Last Night in Twisted River (John Irving)
A Short History of Nearly Everything (Bill Bryson)
and one other I can't remember right now.

What to do, what to do...

Artemis@BC
06-08-2012, 04:45 PM
I got a lot of books from the library all at once and now I don't know which to read first. I have:
The Leftovers (Tom Perrotta)
Divergent
Last Night in Twisted River (John Irving)
A Short History of Nearly Everything (Bill Bryson)
and one other I can't remember right now.

What to do, what to do...

Divergent is a pretty quick read, if that makes any difference. And its sequel, Insurgent, is recently released, so you might want to read Divergent sooner to get yourself in the library queue for the next one.

The Leftovers -- well, I have to be in the right mood for Perrotta ...

The Bill Bryson is entertaining because it's Bill Bryson, but somewhat disatisfying if you're looking for anything in-depth or insightful.

Haven't read the Irving yet.

PDilemma
06-08-2012, 04:58 PM
I just finished Sally Bedell Smith's Elizabeth the Queen. Some of it has good insights, but some is the Court Circular turned into paragraphs to tell what Elizabeth did on a certain day. Smith also works very hard to make Elizabeth look unfailingly good even when writing about faults. As an example, we are told that she never writes a condolence note to anyone she is close to or on the death of anyone she is close to. This is attributed to the unusual depth of her feelings rather than any kind of lack of etiquette or coldness. She is made to look like the ultimate in loving mother-in-laws in regard to the whole Diana debacle. I'm sure she was not entirely in the wrong. But I'm also sure she was not entirely in the right, either. So...while it has interesting insights into the Queen's routines, duties, and even to some extent her personality, the book seems a bit imbalanced and a bit too laudatory. This is the third bio (and most up to date) I have read of her and not the best one. But I cannot remember which other two I read off the top of my head. One was even more laudatory than this and the other much more balanced.

I started Jaycee Duggard's memoir A Stolen Life last night. I have skipped around in it a lot. It is not as hard a read as I had been led to believe. In fact, some of it is a lot of very mundane details, although they are clearly intended to show the degree to which she was brainwashed by the Garridos. I don't know that I will finish every word of it.

PrincessLeppard
06-08-2012, 08:22 PM
I enjoyed Divergent a great deal.

I also recently finished Little Brother, sort of a modern day 1984, except the Winston character sort of wins. Sort of. I love the realistic ending.

I'm currently reading a murder mystery, the name of which escapes me, set in Sarajevo during the siege. It's not a fast read, but very, very good and explains a lot to me about some of the refugees I worked with in Germany.

PRlady
06-08-2012, 09:37 PM
I'm reading The Uninvited Guests by Sadie Jones. I thought it was an Edwardian comedy of manners....and then it got very weird. It's really good, I think I'll be finishing it tonight.

IceAlisa
06-08-2012, 10:55 PM
Still reading La Cousine Bette--Google translate is such a blessing! This book is more scandalous and trashy than a Jerry Springer show, I swear.

A married woman tells 5 different men they are the father of her future child while the husband complacently looks on and tries to figure out how to gain the most advantage out of the situation. He calls the 5 candidates The Five Fathers of the Church. Did I mention Jerry Springer?

skatingfan5
06-08-2012, 11:03 PM
Still reading La Cousine Bette--Google translate is such a blessing! This book is more scandalous and trashy than a Jerry Springer show, I swear.

A married woman tells 5 different men they are the father of her future child while the husband complacently looks on and tries to figure out how to gain the most advantage out of the situation. He calls the 5 candidates The Five Fathers of the Church. Did I mention Jerry Springer?Good thing Maury Povich and his DNA-testing service wasn't around 150 years ago or the scam wouldn't have stood a chance: "You are NOT the father!" :lol:

I can barely remember seeing the mini-series on PBS eons ago -- with Margaret Tyzack and Helen Mirren (which I didn't recall at all!).

ETA: In my 3rd year of French in high school I attempted to read Le Père Goriot but am ashamed to admit that I had to resort to reading it in translation after slogging through only a couple of chapters. :shuffle:

IceAlisa
06-08-2012, 11:06 PM
Yes, Helen Mirren was the :EVILLE: Madame Marneffe but I think she was miscast. Not vampy enough.

mkats
06-09-2012, 12:35 AM
I just finished Sally Bedell Smith's Elizabeth the Queen. Some of it has good insights, but some is the Court Circular turned into paragraphs to tell what Elizabeth did on a certain day. Smith also works very hard to make Elizabeth look unfailingly good even when writing about faults.

That's a very good description of how I felt about this book too.

Fellow FSU readers, I have a confession to make.

I couldn't finish Robert K. Massie's Catherine the Great. :slinkaway: Just couldn't get into it... I ended plowing about halfway through, looked at the pictures, and returned it to the library.

immoimeme
06-09-2012, 03:12 PM
decided "the hunt for red october" was not a bk for ladies. still using "hit lit" list-read "the bridges of madison county" better than i expected, now re-reading "the da vinci code" & remembering why! i! thought! it! sucked! i mean, ken follett does! this! too! but he's much more subtle about it.

Marge_Simpson
06-10-2012, 06:20 AM
Someone left a box of old paperbacks in our laundry room, and I found "Rosemary's Baby" in there. I've seen the film at least 10 times but had never read the book. Of course I knew the ending, but it was very eerie all the same. There's lots of foreshadowing in it, for instance at one point a pregnant Rosemary feels the baby "kicking like a demon" :eek: An excellent read.

IceAlisa
06-10-2012, 06:53 AM
Mini Ice kicked so hard in utero I'd jump up in the middle of lecture screaming. I don't think that's uncommon.

Marge_Simpson
06-10-2012, 07:31 AM
Uh, you've seen the movie, right? :lol: