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Marge_Simpson
05-31-2012, 04:32 AM
I haven't read any of her other books, but I did enjoy The Little Stranger (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594484465?ie=UTF8&ref=aw_bottom_links&force-full-site=1). It's a haunted house story set after WWII.

I finished "Fingersmith" and highly recommend it, I'm on the waiting list to get "The Little Stranger" from the library.
I love a good ghost story, so I borrowed "The Woman in Black" by Susan Hill. I saw the film a few months ago and enjoyed it very much.

Michalle
05-31-2012, 08:23 AM
If you liked Fingersmith, you might like Atonement. It's a bit sadder in tone though. Supposedly, Sarah Waters had a hard time writing it, but I think it's my favorite of all her books. There's some interesting stuff about spiritualism, which I find really interesting, in it as well.

flyingsit
05-31-2012, 01:28 PM
Since we mentioned Jonathan Tropper a couple of days ago, thought I'd mention that I just read his How to Talk to a Widower. I like it even better than This is Where I Leav You.

galaxygirl
05-31-2012, 06:28 PM
I finished "Fingersmith" and highly recommend it, I'm on the waiting list to get "The Little Stranger" from the library.
I love a good ghost story, so I borrowed "The Woman in Black" by Susan Hill. I saw the film a few months ago and enjoyed it very much.

I've been meaning to read another of her books but haven't gotten around to it. Maybe I should put it on my calendar or something. :lol:

I've read and enjoyed The Woman in Black and should be getting the movie from Netflix soon. Have you read The Turn of the Screw? That's another good one.

moojja
05-31-2012, 09:36 PM
All that "Pride and Prejudice" talk made me want to read more books set in the era- but nothing new came to mind- so I started re- reading ( or, rather, re-listening) Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey- Maturin series. The books are set in very early 19th Century England and deal with Naval battles, politics, social customs etc etc. Are there any fans of the series here? I adore the books. Granted, they can get slow and overly technical ( My comprehension of naval terms stops at larboard/ starboard, unfortunately, though there is much to learn if I apply myself, and I LOVE the sea and Naval history, so some day I must), but they are also witty, insightful and full of true history.

I love the series. I'm currently rereading them, great set of books. I get something new each time I read them. Even though they are written in the 20th centuries, it reads like it's by a contemporary of Austen. And it breaks so many rules of story telling, but it still works.

dinakt
06-01-2012, 03:26 AM
I love the series. I'm currently rereading them, great set of books. I get something new each time I read them. Even though they are written in the 20th centuries, it reads like it's by a contemporary of Austen. And it breaks so many rules of story telling, but it still works.

I get smth. new on re- reading , as well. There is so much detail there. I am in awe of Patrick O'Brian's research. The books also cover so much geography! Sometimes I try to follow on the map, and when visiting certain places, parts of the books creep into my head:D I find if I get weary of the books' leasurely pace, I only have to wait, and they are calling again. One really learns to love the characters.
BTW, I thought the film adaptation ( Peter Weir's "Master and Commander") quite terrific, as well- true not so much to the letter, but definitely to the spirit. I own the DVD, and think Russell Crowe nailed Aubrey's character.

flowerpower
06-01-2012, 04:25 AM
...I started re- reading ( or, rather, re-listening) Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey- Maturin series. The books are set in very early 19th Century England and deal with Naval battles, politics, social customs etc etc. Are there any fans of the series here? I adore the books. Granted, they can get slow and overly technical ( My comprehension of naval terms stops at larboard/ starboard, unfortunately, though there is much to learn if I apply myself, and I LOVE the sea and Naval history, so some day I must), but they are also witty, insightful and full of true history.

Wonderful use of language, rich geography, history, characters, action! I really enjoyed the first couple of books in the series (my only quibble...by about the fourth book it started to wear on me that the male characters and their relationships were so well drawn and beautifully depicted, while the female characters were always superficially developed and their roles were peripheral-to-negative. The men kept going back to sea - the only place they were truly alive - to escape the day-to-day drudgery of life, which the women seemed to represent :P. I don't think O'Brian liked women much :lol:.)

That quibble aside, they are very interesting and stimulating reading, IMO. Now I'll have to get out Master and Commander and re-read it!

IceAlisa
06-01-2012, 04:35 AM
Not sure why but I strayed to my French shelf and picked up La Cousine Bette. It's been about 10 years since I had read in French and was wondering if I could do it at all. Turns out, I can, with occasional help from Google Translate. :lol:

Doubt I could still carry on a good conversation though. You don't use it, you lose it.

Glide2
06-01-2012, 06:10 AM
I went to three book sales over the past two weeks. One, the friends of the library, had $2 hardcovers. I found Jay Rayner's The Man who Ate the World. I think he's obsessed with Gordon Ramsay. He really wasn't looking for the perfect meal; he was chasing after celebrity chefs and wildly expensive meals. Also found Endless Feasts: Sixty Years of Gourmet. Lovely stories of the way people used to live. And the very intellectual The Truth about Diamonds by Nicole Ritchie, and a coffee table book, Southern Places.

Best sale, thrift shop, sign on the door as we walked in 20 Books/$1.99. We went back to this store because I'd previously found copies of Sophie Kinsella books and other fiction. But no major finds. Got a copy of Candace Bushnell's 4 Blondes, which is a good trashy summer read so far. Also, The Dancer Who Flew: a memoir of Nureyev, George Burns' Gracie: a Love Story, gymnast Tim Daggett's Dare to Dream, Paradise Gardens with photos of arabic gardens, Falling Angels which is by the author of The Girl with the Pearl Earring, a book on bread baking even though I don't really eat bread at the moment, Six Came Flying (about swans) by the Marquis MacSwiney of Mashanaglass, and a few others. And at 10 cents a book I won't feel too bad when I read and redonate my copy of Tori Spelling's book . They also had movies for $1. I found the ice dancer Ducheney's The Planets which was made in 1994. Haven't watched it yet. Also has Brian Orser listed.

The other sale had a few goodies. Jeannie out of the Bottle by Barbara Eden is a VERY quick read. I like her. Climbing the Mountain: My Search for Meaning by Kirk Douglas is inspiring. He's an interesting guy and a great story teller. I found two Truman Capotes, In Cold Blood and The Grass Harp. Also Peachtree Bouquet which is the DeKalb County Jr League Cookbook , Memoirs of a Geisha, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, and The piano Shop on the Left Bank.

OK , it's too many books. I have 5 started. Slight overdose of reading material.

A.H.Black
06-01-2012, 02:44 PM
All your choice sound great except for "In Cold Blood". It's one of 2 or 3 books in my life that I have put down and refuse to continue after the first few chapters. It's too much for me.

On a side note. Did anyone watch the American Masters program about Harper Lee? There's quite a bit about her friendship with Truman Capote. If anyone's interested it's available online here. (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/harper-lee-hey-boo/watch-the-full-documentary/2049/) I also liked the one about Margaret Mitchell.

LilJen
06-01-2012, 03:58 PM
About halfway through Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself by Harriet Jacobs. (Free on Kindle--yay for public domain books!) Really interesting and very readable, if depressing.

IceAlisa
06-01-2012, 04:22 PM
All your choice sound great except for "In Cold Blood". It's one of 2 or 3 books in my life that I have put down and refuse to continue after the first few chapters. It's too much for me.


It's a blood-chilling story, especially since it had actually happened. But it's an excellent book.

pair mom
06-01-2012, 04:51 PM
Anyone else feeling that Adriana Trigiani's 'The Shoemaker's Wife' could have done with a more serious edit? It started off great....but now 3/4 the way through, I'm finding her additions of misc. minute details of Italian/Mediterranean culture off-putting. She seems determined to reveal all her extensive research, whether it advances/enhances the story line. I'll finish it because I'm stubborn...but just sayin'!

cygnus
06-02-2012, 03:08 AM
It's a blood-chilling story, especially since it had actually happened. But it's an excellent book.

Yup. Very well written. I read it many years ago, and have absolutely no desire to reread it. Ever.

IceAlisa
06-02-2012, 03:17 AM
Yup. Very well written. I read it many years ago, and have absolutely no desire to reread it. Ever.

Me neither. But I got to know and like Truman Capote.