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flyingsit
02-14-2012, 10:54 PM
It's sitting on the coffee table waiting til I'm back from a winter holiday with my ereader. Currently enjoying Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet. But Zafon will be my next "curl up and escape"! So many books, so little time! :D

I loved Hotel on the Corner...

Artemis@BC
02-14-2012, 11:59 PM
I can't believe I'm going to admit this: I liked the movies more than the books.
I feel a weight has been lifted.........

Confession is good for the soul.

Nomad
02-15-2012, 12:03 AM
I can't believe I'm going to admit this: I liked the movies more than the books.
I feel a weight has been lifted.........

Me, too. The only book from that series that I actually finished was The Hobbit.

Prancer
02-15-2012, 01:54 AM
I tried to read The Hobbit once, and couldn't get through that, much less the rest.

Then again, I didn't especially like the movies, either. :shuffle: I don't think I've managed to stay awake through The Return of the King yet.

I have decided to stop buying ebooks until I've read a certain percentage of the ones I've already downloaded, so I just read one of my freebies--a very strange book called Their Last Suppers: Legends of History and Their Final Meals (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/their-last-suppers-andrew-caldwell/1100377894?ean=9780740797835&itm=1&usri=their+last+suppers). The author is a chef who owns a small inn, where he hosts history weekends that feature foods eaten by various historical figures. The book has a history lesson on each featured person, gives the menu for that person's last meal (or in some cases, a favorite menu if the last meal was boring, like JFKs, or unknown, like Alexander the Great's).

Yes, I know, but it was free and I thought the recipes might be interesting. I might actually try a couple of the recipes, but some of the histories made me :confused:. His version of Princess Diana's life is fangirly to the point of being revisionist (Diana was always faithful to Charles and didn't take up with James Hewitt until two years after her divorce? Really?). And he does like his conspiracy theories.

But anyway, some of the stuff about food was interesting and some of the recipes are worth a shot, but overall--a very strange little book.

RockTheTassel
02-15-2012, 02:10 AM
I finished Sarah's Key. I agree with what some of you said in the previous thread - I loved Sarah's part of the story and wanted to skip Julia's. I liked it, but I wish it had just been about Sarah.

If anyone is looking for a fun, light book, try Sorcery and Cecelia or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot by Patricia Wrede and Caroline Stevermer. It's a lovely, mostly unknown book that is kind of like Pride and Prejudice mixed with fantasy.

lmarie086
02-15-2012, 03:51 AM
I can't believe I'm going to admit this: I liked the movies more than the books.
I feel a weight has been lifted.........

You're not alone. I attempted to read Fellowship of the Ring...and read the first paragraph at least 5 times, and zoned out between each time. That went a long way in making me like C.S Lewis more-sometimes less is more. The Chronicles of Narnia, for example, are very minimalist in detail, but it gives the reader so much room to imagine. I loved that as a kid, and still do now.

Still chugging my way through series A Song of Fire and Ice! Finally on the third book; if school wasn't such a nuisance (lol) I'd be done already. But at this pace, I won't finish the 5th book until George R.R. Martin publishes the 6th one, so maybe I should be thankful for schoolwork haha!

galaxygirl
02-15-2012, 04:04 AM
If anyone is looking for a fun, light book, try Sorcery and Cecelia or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot by Patricia Wrede and Caroline Stevermer. It's a lovely, mostly unknown book that is kind of like Pride and Prejudice mixed with fantasy.

I'm trying to not start any new series that are finished being published (though I expect to fail :D) but I have this one in my goodreads queue.

rfisher
02-15-2012, 04:05 AM
I've listened to the LOTR trilogy at least 10 times. :rofl: Except for the sojourn with Bombadill, I love the books.

IceAlisa
02-15-2012, 04:07 AM
I tried to read The Hobbit once, and couldn't get through that, much less the rest.

Then again, I didn't especially like the movies, either. :shuffle: I don't think I've managed to stay awake through The Return of the King yet.


I could only get through a few pages of The Hobbit. And have never been able to watch any of the movies.

zaphyre14
02-15-2012, 01:12 PM
I've listened to the LOTR trilogy at least 10 times. :rofl: Except for the sojourn with Bombadill, I love the books.

So far, the sojourn with Bombadill is the only part I liked (although the deal with Goldberry creeps me out a little).

Way back in my brief career teaching Jr. High English, I had to teach "The Hobbit". All but two kids in the class hated it - and so did I.

I haven't seen the LOTR movies. But I can understand how seeing the saga would be better than reading Every. Tiny. Detail.

As antidote, I picked up Jo Beverly's latest Malloren tale "A Scandalous Countess" at the grocery store last night. Frothy dreck should go well on a chilly winter's night. :)

modern_muslimah
02-15-2012, 02:29 PM
I read The Hobbit in high school. I remember liking it but not loving it. Hence, I never had a real interest in reading the rest of the books nor seeing the movie. The only reason I might see The Hobbit is to see Richard Armitage :swoon:

rfisher
02-15-2012, 02:33 PM
So far, the sojourn with Bombadill is the only part I liked (although the deal with Goldberry creeps me out a little).

Way back in my brief career teaching Jr. High English, I had to teach "The Hobbit". All but two kids in the class hated it - and so did I.

I haven't seen the LOTR movies. But I can understand how seeing the saga would be better than reading Every. Tiny. Detail.

As antidote, I picked up Jo Beverly's latest Malloren tale "A Scandalous Countess" at the grocery store last night. Frothy dreck should go well on a chilly winter's night. :)

I loved the Hobbit. :lol: It was actually my favorite of the 4 books as it had the most humor. Of course, I was a total LOTR geek a long time ago including having a cat named Gandalf. I was also one of those people pointing out what Peter Jackson did wrong. Although, for the most part, the changes in the movies didn't annoy me nearly as much as the changes in HP. I think because Ian McKellen was the quintessential Gandalf and the computer generated Gollum was brilliant. I didn't even mind all the changes they did with Arwen Evenstar so they could broaden Liv Tyler's role in the movies.

LilJen
02-15-2012, 02:37 PM
I needed a loooooonnng audio book for a weekend drive. The library is low on cassettes so I grabbed "The Fellowship of the Ring" even though I know I've read it before decades ago. Now I'm reminded of why I disliked it: it's tedious enough to listen to and the chapters are endless! But I'm slogging along with it - pretty much along with the Hobbits on their quest - which as quests go, is pretty vague to begin with. I may end up doing the rest of the trilogy for Lent.... :)

Oh my. The trilogy (sans Hobbit) was, about 2 years after finishing a college lit degree, the *first* stuff I can remember being totally glued to for hours at a time. Prior to that I was totally burned out on literature. Different strokes :)

Two really interesting books I've read recently for our book group: The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson and Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi. The former is all about the Chicago World's Fair in 1893; shifts between telling of the guy who spearheaded the design/building of it and a creepy murderer active around that time in Chicago who capitalized on all the strangers coming into town for the fair. Very interesting stories. (Did you know that Cracker Jacks and Shredded Wheat were introduced at the fair? The Ferris wheel, too, as a one-upsmanship project to Paris's Eiffel Tower.)

Not done with the latter yet but really engaging nonfiction about a literature group in the late 1990s in Iran--women who secretly read and discussed books that were not looked upon kindly by the regime.

Nan
02-15-2012, 04:58 PM
Today only you can get Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere for $2.99 on Nook or Kindle. Of course, I already have the tree-book.

I've never read any of his graphic novels, but I saw this in the "bargin bin" and it looks interesting. It will probably be the next thing I read when I'm done with my current book.


Two really interesting books I've read recently for our book group: The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson ...

My daughter asked for this for Christmas and she ended up with two copies, so she gave me one. I got about a third of the way through it when someone "lifted" it at work. I didn't think I'd like it, but I was really drawn in. I'm visiting my daughter next month and if she's done with her copy, I plan on bringing it home with me. :)

modern_muslimah
02-15-2012, 06:24 PM
I finished The Marriage Plot a few days ago. I gave it one star on Goodreads so you can imagine my feelings about the book. It was one of the most pretentious, annoying books I've read in quite some time. The one lesson I took away from this book is to leave the marriage plot in 19th century where it belongs. Don't force shallow 1980s Ivy League undergrads into. It just doesn't work.

Now, to give my brain a break, I'm reading Sweet Stuff, a nice contemporary romance I borrowed from the library. 30 pages in and so far, I'm liking it.