PDA

View Full Version : Libro filum--the book thread



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 [27] 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

rjblue
05-14-2012, 12:28 AM
The most awesome thing on Goodreads right now: Patrick Rothfuss, author of the extremely popular Kingkiller Chronicles trilogy (book 1 The Name of the Wind (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/186074.The_Name_of_the_Wind), book 2 The Wise Man's Fear (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1215032.The_Wise_Man_s_Fear)), smacks down those who've rated his unfinished book 3 The Doors of Stone (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2495565.The_Doors_of_Stone)-- http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/327213074I just added The Name of the Wind to my "to read" list a week ago. Just for that blog, I think I'll move it up in priority.

Artemis@BC
05-14-2012, 05:49 PM
Just spotted that Christopher Moore has a new one out, Sacré Bleu: A Comedy D'art. I went through a Moore binge a couple of years ago but haven't read much of his recently. And this one sounds like a bit of a departure for him too. I'm number 6 in the library queue -- I hope the folks ahead of me are fast readers!

PDilemma
05-18-2012, 07:40 PM
Semester is over and no summer classes for me. That means I get to read books I want to read!!! (Insofar as the local public library has them available, that is)

I just finished Gabby: A Story of Courage and Hope by Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords. Hard read. But she is amazing to have come as far as she has since the shooting.

I'm opening up The Spire by Richard North Patterson, next. I really like Patterson. Has anyone here read his stuff?

IceAlisa
05-18-2012, 07:46 PM
Still reading Devil in the White City. I suppose people's threshold for weirdness and creepiness was a lot lower back then, since no one thought to report Holmes and his vaults.

Nan
05-18-2012, 09:50 PM
I just finished Gabby: A Story of Courage and Hope by Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords. Hard read. But she is amazing to have come as far as she has since the shooting.

I may have to get this. Mark Kelly was the speaker at our graduation ceremony last Saturday and I had several chances to chat with him. Nice guy and you can see his love for his wife when he talks about her.

PDilemma
05-18-2012, 10:20 PM
I may have to get this. Mark Kelly was the speaker at our graduation ceremony last Saturday and I had several chances to chat with him. Nice guy and you can see his love for his wife when he talks about her.

The book is essentially in his voice. He is definitely devoted to caring for her. I hope that he is able to maintain that commitment as you can tell in the book that the first seven to eight months was daunting and exhausting for him.

oleada
05-19-2012, 02:16 AM
I went to the Met today, to see the Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada: Impossible Conversations exhibit (which was great) and picked up Schiaparelli's autobiography, Shocking Life. It's hilarious, very interesting and Schiaparelli is very, very witty.

LilJen
05-19-2012, 04:19 PM
Still reading Devil in the White City. I suppose people's threshold for weirdness and creepiness was a lot lower back then, since no one thought to report Holmes and his vaults.

That and the economy was so bad at the time that Holmes could hire and fire so no one really ever had an idea of the big picture of what he was building. . . except the guy who was so happy to get the cadavers to send off for medical research (eeeww).

I highly recommend Hark! A Vagrant! by Kate Beaton. Bday gift from my hubby. Funny literary humor (eg, the Bronte sisters argue about what kind of man is "hot"), and Canadian humor (most of which eluded me, as I'm not Canadian and don't know Canadian history).
http://www.amazon.com/Hark-Vagrant-Kate-Beaton/dp/1770460608

IceAlisa
05-19-2012, 05:29 PM
That and the economy was so bad at the time that Holmes could hire and fire so no one really ever had an idea of the big picture of what he was building. . . except the guy who was so happy to get the cadavers to send off for medical research (eeeww).
True. But there was a person whom he'd asked to go into the vault and scream so he could tell whether it could be heard from the outside. He didn't think it was a tiny bit strange?


I highly recommend Hark! A Vagrant! by Kate Beaton. Bday gift from my hubby. Funny literary humor (eg, the Bronte sisters argue about what kind of man is "hot"), and Canadian humor (most of which eluded me, as I'm not Canadian and don't know Canadian history).
http://www.amazon.com/Hark-Vagrant-Kate-Beaton/dp/1770460608
As to the kind of man the Bronte sisters (at least 2 of them) consider hot--that's the kind of man that makes me want to :scream:

PrincessLeppard
05-19-2012, 08:00 PM
I'm reading The Return Man, and the story is excellent, but don't you think a famous and well respected zombie hunter could hang on to his fecking gun? I have lost count of how many times he's dropped it.

Wyliefan
05-19-2012, 08:56 PM
I'm reading The Return Man, and the story is excellent, but don't you think a famous and well respected zombie hunter could hang on to his fecking gun? I have lost count of how many times he's dropped it.

Butterfingers. :D

Finished Bring Up the Bodies. Excellent. Even better than Wolf Hall, I think.

immoimeme
05-20-2012, 05:37 PM
since i have so much free time :p i decided 2 write one bestseller that will carry over from yr 2 yr. so i read "hit list: cracking the code of the twentieth century's biggest bestsellers" 2 get the scoop on how-to. two novels -"the exorcist" & "jonathan livingston seagull"- i had no recollection of how popular they were. perhaps no one else remembers either & my hot new novel about a possessed seagull will er, really soar. ya think? lol

zaphyre14
05-23-2012, 06:38 PM
If I hear one more word about "Fifty Shades of Gray", I'll chug a grenade into the nearest book display! I glanced through a copy in the airport bookstore and what little I read made me cringe - not at the sex scenes (40 years of reading trashy romances has pretty much numbed me to smut) - but at the overblown writing. Give me a break, people, it's soft porn (or even not-so-soft) at best and nothing that Anais Nin and her ilk were writing decades ago. All I'm wondering is how many copies of Shades will be turning up at my church book sale in November (and we'll have to weed them out and pass them over to the library).

On another note altogether, I read "Douglass' Women" by Jewel Parker Rhodes last week. It's the fictionalized story of former slave and abolishonist Frederick Bailey Douglass and the two women who loved him: Anna, his black first wife who helps him escape his master and establish himself in the world she herself eschews, and Ottilie, his white mistress. Douglass himself comes off as a pretty self-absorbed bastard to my mind. But it was an interesting view of the times and the women forced to deal with a difficult man - and with each other, for his sake.

LilJen
05-23-2012, 06:54 PM
As to the kind of man the Bronte sisters (at least 2 of them) consider hot--that's the kind of man that makes me want to :scream:
EXACTLY. The fact that they--and perhaps other women of the time--idealized these mentally unstable men is pretty creepy.

I have been reading old Bloom County and Outland collections (Berkeley Breathed). Really excellent stuff. One strip skewers the conservatives' yelling "liberal! Commie!" and the like on one hand while taking gov't handouts and complaining about the deficit on the other. Prescient? Or "the more things change the more they stay the same?" And all kinds of good stuff with the neurotic Opus.

Zemgirl
05-23-2012, 07:22 PM
If I hear one more word about "Fifty Shades of Gray", I'll chug a grenade into the nearest book display! I glanced through a copy in the airport bookstore and what little I read made me cringe - not at the sex scenes (40 years of reading trashy romances has pretty much numbed me to smut) - but at the overblown writing. Give me a break, people, it's soft porn (or even not-so-soft) at best and nothing that Anais Nin and her ilk were writing decades ago. All I'm wondering is how many copies of Shades will be turning up at my church book sale in November (and we'll have to weed them out and pass them over to the library).
it's not soft porn, it's just badly written. And my impression is that many in the romance community have been decidedly unenthusiastic about this trilogy; see for instance this (http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/blog/50-shades-of-grey-by-e.l.-james), this (http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/f-reviews/review-fifty-shades-of-grey-by-e-l-james/), and this (http://karenknowsbest.com/2012/04/05/karens-review-fifty-shades-of-grey-by-el-james/), as well as Jennifer Armintrout's chapter by chapter recap (start here (http://jenniferarmintrout.blogspot.com/2012/04/50-shades-of-grey-chapter-one-or-why.html)). I'd say this success story is being driven by overwhelming buzz started by non-romance/erotica readers who think they've discovered something groundbreaking. Ha, I think not.

But a lot of (better) authors will be able to capitalize on the success of 50 Shades to reach a broader audience - here's one example (http://www.pr.com/press-release/402360) - so that's good.