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modern_muslimah
05-04-2012, 01:51 AM
I just started Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13284033-why-it-s-kicking-off-everywhere) and Fifty Shades of Grey. The first book is interesting so far. The author is discussing the events leading to the demonstrations at Tahrir Square. Later in the book, he looks at other protest movements that occurred throughout 2011. As the title implies, he sees a link between all these movements. As for Fifty, well the writing is bad as I expected but for some reason I'm curious to see how it ends so I think I will read it through.

Evilynn
05-04-2012, 02:00 PM
Just started CH's newest Sookie Stackhouse: Deadlocked. As I always do, I read the last page and my predictions books and books ago about who I think Sookie will ultimately end up with still stands. :D To me, there was only one conclusion. I am surprised that CH left the book open for another. I thought she was wrapping things up, but apparently she's not finished milking the series since the HBO popularity spike with Sookie yet.

It was originally meant to be 10 books, but she signed a contract for 3 more at some point and I think this is #11? I'm sure I'll read the last three, but I do kinda wish she'd stuck to her original 10, that would've been plenty.

Got 40 pages left of Lavinia (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2214574.Lavinia), and I'm rather enjoying it, although the first 40 pages were a bit of a slog. I started reading Le Morte D'Arthur on the subway, but after 10 pages of "Then...And then...And then....And then..." I think I'll let my paperback copy go unread. :P I'm a sucker for Arthuriana, but there's only so much repetition I can take.

pair mom
05-04-2012, 04:52 PM
Has anyone read Bulgakov's Master and the Margarita? I wanted to read a Russian novel and somebody recommended this to me, but I'm finding it hard to get through. The style is not like anything I'm used to (haven't read any Russian literature) and there are so many characters, each being referred to with one name, their full names or their nicknames interchangeably which makes it hard to keep track of who everyone is. On page 70 so far and not sure if I should continue. Anybody wanna tell me if it gets better? :)

Welcome to the world of Russian lit...I had just this experience the summer between high school and first year University when I decided to tackle Dr. Zhivago! Every third character was named Yuri or Misha, Sasha...etc...and no character index in the front...so I made my own! But after 6 weeks of laborious notetaking...finally finished...but remain so scared I still haven't seen the movie! :) Press on...you'll be proud of yourself if nothing else! ;)
;)

IceAlisa
05-04-2012, 05:55 PM
Has anyone read Bulgakov's Master and the Margarita? I wanted to read a Russian novel and somebody recommended this to me, but I'm finding it hard to get through. The style is not like anything I'm used to (haven't read any Russian literature) and there are so many characters, each being referred to with one name, their full names or their nicknames interchangeably which makes it hard to keep track of who everyone is. On page 70 so far and not sure if I should continue. Anybody wanna tell me if it gets better? :)

Oh yes. This is an iconic novel in Russian literature but not very typical of what most consider "Russian lit". It's Master and Margarita, Margarita being a female character.

It's certainly different and contains situations, humor and culture unique to the Soviet Union (the all-powerful bureaucracy, the lack of freedom of speech, the scarcity of everything--all subject to satire). And then there's the novel within the novel about Jesus. And then there's the devil and his minions messing around Moscow. You see what I mean when I say this isn't typical Russian lit.

If you are completely unfamiliar with the Soviet culture and the Russian character, I think you may find it difficult to enjoy. If you really want to tackle it, an index of names would help. I wish the English edition came with it. Also, not all translations are created equal. I've seen worse and better ones.

puglover
05-04-2012, 10:43 PM
I just finished "The Professionals" by Owen Laukkanen. I thought it sounded like an interesting premise - 4 young, anti-establishment university friends get discouraged over the job market and come up with a plan. Kidnap wealthy but not stinking rich business men - no rough stuff - and ask for $60,000 as ransom. Not enough money for these types to sweat about - warn the wife not to call the police - get the money - return the guy safe and sound and move on to another city. However, I really struggled through the book, not many heros and the most likeable are the supposed "bad guys"
and then terrible ending. Just left me empty. Obviously, I would not recommend it at all.

emason
05-05-2012, 01:37 AM
Oh yes. This is an iconic novel in Russian literature but not very typical of what most consider "Russian lit". It's Master and Margarita, Margarita being a female character......

Also, not all translations are created equal. I've seen worse and better ones.

Do you have a particular transition to recommend?

oleada
05-07-2012, 07:07 AM
I've been in a book rut. I feel like I've started a bunch of books and finished none; because school gets in the way or I got bored, etc, etc.

I started Major Pettigrew's Last Stand today, though, and I am loving it. The writing is lovely and it's just charming, so far. I hope I can stick with this one.

Evilynn
05-07-2012, 12:15 PM
I finished Lavinia and picked up my last unread book from the unread shelf (major reading goal achieved, I've usually had a shelf or two filled with books I hadn't read yet), Always Coming Home (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/201901.Always_Coming_Home) (also by Ursula K LeGuin), which is a cultural anthropological/archaeological work over a people (the Kesh) that'll exist in the future. Since it's a bit of a tome I also bought Deadlocked to my Kindle. :shuffle: I'm sure I'll be reading Always Coming Home half the summer and will probably try to read it in tandem with my reread of The Wheel of Time. :)

PrincessLeppard
05-07-2012, 02:52 PM
I finished Rot & Ruin last night. Really good. I have got to stop reading zombie novels late at night, though. :yikes:

flyingsit
05-07-2012, 03:24 PM
I'm most of the way through Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. It dragged for a while but I pushed through and it's picking up now.

Ajax
05-07-2012, 06:58 PM
Oh yes. This is an iconic novel in Russian literature but not very typical of what most consider "Russian lit". It's Master and Margarita, Margarita being a female character.

It's certainly different and contains situations, humor and culture unique to the Soviet Union (the all-powerful bureaucracy, the lack of freedom of speech, the scarcity of everything--all subject to satire). And then there's the novel within the novel about Jesus. And then there's the devil and his minions messing around Moscow. You see what I mean when I say this isn't typical Russian lit.

If you are completely unfamiliar with the Soviet culture and the Russian character, I think you may find it difficult to enjoy. If you really want to tackle it, an index of names would help. I wish the English edition came with it. Also, not all translations are created equal. I've seen worse and better ones.

Thank you for chiming in! (And to everyone else who did) I abandoned Master and Margarita after 90 pages. It was just too difficult to follow and I wasn't enjoying it.

Artemis@BC
05-07-2012, 09:58 PM
I'm a few chapters into A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash. It received all kinds of advance praise and accolades, being called "the next To Kill a Mockingbird" among other things. I try not to get sucked in by such reviews, but I was curious, and did manage to get it first in the library queue. I haven't yet encountered any "breathtaking poetic prose" or the like, but I am still enjoying it so far.

PrincessLeppard
05-08-2012, 12:56 AM
I find "breathtaking poetic prose" to be over-rated and annoying. Or pretentious. But some people like that sort of thing, I suppose.

I just want to read about people getting eaten. :watch:

rfisher
05-08-2012, 01:24 AM
I find "breathtaking poetic prose" to be over-rated and annoying. Or pretentious. But some people like that sort of thing, I suppose.

I just want to read about people getting eaten. :watch:

I'll take people being eaten any day over breathtaking poetic prose which screams BORING to me.

Have you bought the Walking Dead graphic novels? They're in a compendium. I've just read up to where the TV show is so I don't get too spoiled. There are some significant differences between the two.

Prancer
05-08-2012, 01:55 AM
I just want to read about people getting eaten. :watch:

You're such a simple girl with such simple tastes.