PDA

View Full Version : Libro filum--the book thread



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Evilynn
04-23-2012, 11:22 AM
Finished book #3 in the Dante Valentine series and I highly doubt I'll pick up book 4 & 5. What is it about UF/PR books and seriously controlling and abusive male characters whom the female lead somehow ends up with, and it's pictured as some kind of happy ending?

Only got the epilogue left of Under Heaven (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7139892-under-heaven), and since it's a fictive story set in Tang dynasty China I decided to read up a little on the period, and seems like Kay stuck pretty damned close to the events leading up to the An Lushan rebellion. Very good book.

I picked up Ursula LeGuin's Lavinia (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2214574.Lavinia) again, and I hope that:
1. It won't matter that I've actually never read the Aeneid :shuffle:
2. I'm rested enough that I can enjoy the experience this time around. :coffee:

zaphyre14
04-23-2012, 07:31 PM
I had a small amount of time to kill in NYC on Saturday and wandered through the NY Free Public Library just to sightsee. When I passed the gift shop, the authors of "All My Friends Are Dead" and "All My Friends Are Still Dead" were setting up for a signing. I'd read the first one before so I stopped in. The two guys are hysterical! Just setting up their table had everyone in the room laughing at their back-and-forth banter. I was so amused, I bought both books and had them autographed, although that's not something I'm into. Both books are ten-minute reads, but very good gift books for a friend's birthday.

I also bought these little gadgets called Thumb Thingies that you slip on your thumb to hold book pages open with one hand. Probably useless but they're cute and again a gift for a book-loving friend. :)

modern_muslimah
04-23-2012, 08:29 PM
I just finished The Handmaid's Tale. I was suppose to read it in high school but I only got a quarter way through before relying on cliff notes. :shuffle: So I figured since I am older that perhaps I could actually make it through the book and I did! To my amazement, I liked it and gave it four stars on Goodreads. In terms of pure dystopian nightmares, it's great to read. I know there are other messages about feminism, class, and the loss of human rights but I felt at times that book was beating me over the head with that message.

So now I am reading Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking. It took forever for me to get off the wait list but I finally got it from the library. I'm about a third of the way done. It's pretty interesting and definitely validating if you're an introvert who has ever felt misunderstood by extroverts. I think it's probably good too for extroverts who can't understand why introverts do some of the things they do.

I also managed to get an e-book copy of The Translator for $0.77 after using a coupon code I found on an e-reading site. :D I can't wait to read it this summer. This is my last week of school, so I am looking forward to reading to my heart's content starting next week. :swoon:

Artemis@BC
04-23-2012, 09:09 PM
I finished The Land of Decoration by Grace McCleen ... and I'm still not sure how I feel about it. It's about a 10-year-old girl who's living in a very fundamentalist household, and suddenly finds she can talk to God and perform miracles. It's one of those books where you're not sure what's real and what's her imagination as a defence mechanism against the bullying she suffers at school. And the ending doen't really resolve the issue for you -- you have to make the determination for yourself. Your perspectives on faith and the existance or non-existance of god will colour your perceptions as well.

I did enjoy the narrative, and the imagery and metaphors were quite breathtaking in parts. So overall I guess I'd give it a thumbs up.

Buzz
04-24-2012, 02:31 AM
A Thousand Splendid Suns. A wonderful read but I wouldn't say it is the best book I have read this year. The book has a Bollywood type feel to it at times.

Spinner
04-24-2012, 03:52 AM
I also managed to get an e-book copy of The Translator for $0.77 after using a coupon code I found on an e-reading site. :D I can't wait to read it this summer. This is my last week of school, so I am looking forward to reading to my heart's content starting next week. :swoon:

Is this the book by Leila Aboulela? I really liked her newest book, Lyrics Alley (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8965997-lyrics-alley).

IceAlisa
04-24-2012, 05:22 AM
Conversation over dinner tonight.

Mini Ice: Mommy, did you know there are different infinities?

Me: Have you been reading David Foster Wallace?

Mini: What's infinity+1,000?

Me: :eek:

flyingsit
04-24-2012, 02:20 PM
I just finished The Boy in the Suitcase. Pretty good story, not a great one, but worth a read.

Ajax
04-24-2012, 08:22 PM
I've been 3/3 in disappointments in the last few books I read. Read the Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Zafon which I thought was horrid overblown melodrama, The Princess Bride by William Goldman which is pretty funny but has an annoying framing device that ruined my enjoyment of the book after a while, and The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. Gaiman is my favorite author but The Graveyeard Book sucked, it reads like a collection of short stories which Neil tried to force into being a novel and it doesn't work. For a palate cleanser after getting through 3 disappointing books, I checked out Linda Fairstein's Lethal Legacy from the library. It's just what I needed: a good whodunit, not great literature but a fun read. The crime is related to the New York Public Library and cartography which added a great layer to the book.

PrincessLeppard
04-24-2012, 08:42 PM
:lol: I loved both The Princess Bride and The Graveyard Book.

You probably liked Mockingjay :drama:

;)

pair mom
04-24-2012, 09:05 PM
Read the Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Zafon which I thought was horrid overblown melodrama,

Sorry to read that you didn't enjoy this book...I thought it was one of my favourites ever! I've recently finished my first of Stephen King's... 11/22/63 and liked it... Maybe you'd enjoy it?:)

Marge_Simpson
04-25-2012, 02:28 AM
I finished "Escape From Camp 14" It is horrifying, but a must-read if you are interested in North Korea.
I am currently reading "The Classical Compendium" by Philip Matyszak. It is fascinating- lots of off-beat lists and tidbits. Check it out if you are into Ancient Greece or Rome.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Classical-Compendium-Miscellany-Scandalous/dp/0500051623/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1335317101&sr=1-1

Spinner
04-25-2012, 03:18 AM
Read the Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Zafon which I thought was horrid overblown melodrama, The Princess Bride by William Goldman which is pretty funny but has an annoying framing device that ruined my enjoyment of the book after a while, and The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. Gaiman is my favorite author but The Graveyeard Book sucked, it reads like a collection of short stories which Neil tried to force into being a novel and it doesn't work.

Wow, of readers I know you're in a total minority regarding SoTW. Like pair mom, it's also one of my all-time faves. I also really enjoyed The Graveyard Book, though I thought the writing was fairly mature for a book for young readers. But, to each his (her?) own.

Ajax
04-25-2012, 07:34 PM
:lol:
You probably liked Mockingjay :drama:
;)

:lol:
I thought Mockingjay was so-so, actually :D

ETA: What did everyone love so much about The Shadow of the Wind? I'm genuinely curious. I hated, among other things: the 16 year old narrator who sounded not remotely 16 and more like he swallowed a dictionary, the too-flowery language, the fact that none of the women in the story had any function or personality aside from being penis receptacles for men to obsess over, the clumsy "repeated history" motif with the out-of-wedlock pregnancies, the accidental incest that was straight out of a telenovela, the lovely depictions of cops urinating and defecating all over everyone and everything, the fact that this awesome concept of book cemetery is brought up but never explained or developed (how is it different from a 2nd hand bookshop again?)...

As for the Princess Bride, PrincessLeppard, I'd be interested to hear what you thought of Goldman pretending that Morgenstern was a real author and throwing in fake asides about his publisher and made up, tasteless stories about how doesn't like his fat son or his wife.

On another note, does anyone like to read cookbooks? Both for recipes and for food writing I mean... I'd love any cookbook recommendations. Right now I'm reading "Tender" by Nigel Slater and it's absolutely amazing. The author devotes a chapter to each of the veggies he grows in his London garden and gives tips for growing and cooking them. It's not just a cookbook but a great meditation on vegetables and gardening in general. He has a lovely, understated sense of humor. The photos are gorgeously moody and the food looks real tasty too!

Artemis@BC
04-25-2012, 10:20 PM
I was cleaning up one of my piles o' books on the weekend and came across my half-read copy of Blind Faith by Ben Elton. I'd had to put it aside several months ago when some library holds came in, and then forgot about it. Well, I've finished it now. It wasn't perfect -- I thought he got too high-handed in the last act, and the ending was extremely unsatisfying. But the premise is great, and very timely. (It's about a dystopian future where privacy and secrets -- and science -- are outlawed, and "sharing" everything not only expected, it's required.) And overall I did enjoy the satirical writing. Not surprising considering the author -- I'll definitely be looking for more of his books.

Now I'm reading another one that's been in my pile for a while: After Hamelin by Bill Richardson. It's about the 1 child left behind after the Pied Piper takes all the rest of the children away ... and what happened to them. It's not as LOL or bitingly satirical as some of his other writing like the Bachelor Brothers Bed & Breakfast books or Waiting for Gertrude, but it is aimed at a young audience after all, and I am enjoying it so far.