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dinakt
04-11-2012, 06:20 AM
Does anyone read paranormal romance or urban fantasy?

I never see any of these books discussed. I'm currently listening to the audio book for Lover Reborn by JR Ward. Ward's writing is so special.

I am a big fan of urban fantasy (it's my " I am working hard so just let me escape" go-to literature), but PR- not so much ( only if it also has a good adventure plot). I also mostly listen to them on audiobooks, as it is my exercise/ hiking material, so the narrator/ actor becomes very important.
My favorites: Neil Gaiman ("American Gods", "Neverwhere"), Jim Butcher's "Dresden Files" ( James Marsters narrates them to perfection; one has to get through 3 decent, but not spectacular books till it truly gets good, but it's worth it), Ilona Andrews' Kate Daniels series. My most recent series has been "The Hollows" by Kim Harrison, which I also enjoyed quite a bit. I am something of a fantasy/sci-fi nerd ( and I love LOTR books, LOL, poems and all)

immoimeme
04-11-2012, 08:06 PM
"Just Friends" by Patti smith was a sweet read.

I had to quit reading Yet Another Book about how we are killing our water because it was Just 2 F****ing Depressing.

So then I re-read "the girl with the Dragon Tattoo" and once again started drinking waaaay too much coffee. Kaffee? anyway, it's a good thang the characters didn't smoke too much too LOL.

Nan
04-11-2012, 09:12 PM
I finished Elizabeth Chadwick's The Greatest Knight and am moving on to The Scarlet Lion. I do love William Marshal! :D

Buzz
04-11-2012, 09:47 PM
Finished that book sometime ago and it is wonderful.

Artemis@BC
04-11-2012, 10:09 PM
I finished Divergent last night. Pretty good. The comparisons to The Hunger Games are inevitable, and though there are definitely similarities, it definitely stands on its own. I think the "world" of THG is more developed, but the premise of Divergent is very good too, and I liked a lot of the characterizations better.

The love story was the weakest part IMO, but then, I'm not a teenage girl. I agree with others who found the ending somewhat rushed and haphazard -- almost as if the author only decided at the last minute that there'd be a sequel. But I also thought the whole last act was very much like an episdose of Doctor Who, and that's rarely a bad thing. :D

cygnus
04-12-2012, 01:12 AM
I managed to get a lot of reading done during my trip to Nice for the recent World Championships. Long plane rides and wait times in airports will do that!

I read both volumes of Margaret Powell's delightful memoirs of being a kitchen maid in the 1920s "Below Stairs" and "Climbing the Stairs". They are very readable and she has a great sense of humour. And it's rare to read the inside story of a woman from the working classes of that era- there are so few of them written. Any fans of Downton Abbey should read these books!

Also I read Boris Akunin's "Sister Pelagia and the White Bulldog", which I enjoyed a lot. I had read some of his Fandorin mysteries, but not any from this series. I will probably pick up some more in the Pelagia series.

I finished Christopher Fowler's "Bryant and May off the Rails" the next volume in his Peculiar Crimes Unit series. I really enjoy his dry sense of humour, and this one was a bit more realistic than the steampunky "Seventy-Seven Clocks"- although the whole series stretches one's credulity (in a good way!).

Lastly (I had to attend skating occasionally!) was Jules Stewart's biography of Prince Albert. It was well written and interesting enough, but it's odd that Albert, who was undoubtedly a Good and Worthy Man, unappreciated during his lifetime comes across as dull, while Victoria, exasperating as she was, comes across as brimming with life. I don't know why this is, but I've read a lot about this couple and it's always the same.

IceAlisa
04-12-2012, 05:20 PM
I had finished Russian Winter last week. I found it in dire need of editing--very bloated. The characters of Drew and Grigori were utterly uninteresting, which is strange because Drew is partially based on the author herself and you'd think she'd come up with something more three-dimensional. That's the bad.

The good is that despite her very brief visit to Moscow and cursory knowledge of Russian, she was able to convey a sense of authenticity of Stalin's Russia. The despair, the hopelessness along with the ever-fading ability to cling to the faith in the Great Leader were well represented. What lacked was a bit of humor--Russians have the ability to inject humor even into the worst situations. See Master and Margarita.

Overall, it's no mean accomplishment--another time, another country and a culture inimical to her own presented in a believable way. The Russian part of the novel was very successful IMO and the American was not. Ironic.

Now I am reading This Side Of Paradise as a palate cleanser as I am in need of good prose after 400+ pages of Miss Kalatay's efforts. So far the self-absorption of an upper class American adolescent is excellently portrayed but I wouldn't be sorry if he grows up really soon, like on the next page. :shuffle:

Spinner
04-12-2012, 11:30 PM
Reading Diane Setterfield's The Thirteenth Tale (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/864034.The_Thirteenth_Tale) right now. Omg, if you liked Shadow of the Wind, read this book. Wow.

gingercrush
04-13-2012, 03:28 AM
Besides The Hunger games. I recently read the Jungle. OMG the last five chapters were just torture to read. Naive politics at its worst. Jurgis just gets deeper and deeper into trouble and then it ends with two chapters of politics being lectured at you. Just bizarre. Also o.o the meat industry might be cleaner and more ethical but they're still pumping water into our foods and processed foods are becoming ever more processed.

Next book I'm reading is Iron Council by China Mieville.

Spinner
04-13-2012, 04:05 AM
Next book I'm reading is Iron Council by China Mieville.
I have an advanced copy of his new book, Railsea (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/railsea-china-mieville/1104882675?ean=9780345524522). It's a young adult novel that's a re-imagining of Moby Dick.

Also, Little Brown publishing released today the name of JK Rowling's new novel for adults, called The Casual Vacancy (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1110118103). Pub date is Sept. 27 and people are already balking at the list price of $35 US, ebook for $19.99 US. I don't think it'll have a problem selling though, and doubtful LB will release any advance copies at all.

dinakt
04-13-2012, 04:09 AM
Reading Diane Setterfield's The Thirteenth Tale (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/864034.The_Thirteenth_Tale) right now. Omg, if you liked Shadow of the Wind, read this book. Wow.

Yup, I enjoyed that one, as well.

michiruwater
04-13-2012, 04:32 AM
Also o.o the meat industry might be cleaner and more ethical but they're still pumping water into our foods and processed foods are becoming ever more processed.

It was cleaner and more ethical for a limited time. I vastly disagree that it is cleaner or more ethical now, however. I can't think that animals standing knee-deep in their own feces while packed together like hay in a haystack is clean, and the way they are treated and the way the meat industry tries to hide all the e coli, antibiotics, etc., that ends up in our meat and kills people is definitely not ethical.

Artemis@BC
04-13-2012, 04:22 PM
I recently read the Jungle. OMG the last five chapters were just torture to read. Naive politics at its worst. Jurgis just gets deeper and deeper into trouble and then it ends with two chapters of politics being lectured at you. Just bizarre. Also o.o the meat industry might be cleaner and more ethical but they're still pumping water into our foods and processed foods are becoming ever more processed.

Have you read My Year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki? Two completely different styles, and of course settings, so not really a fair comparison ... but IMO it's a far superior book to The Jungle.

rfisher
04-13-2012, 09:01 PM
I'm listening to Josh Bazell's newest book Wild Things. It's even funnier than Grim Reaper. And this one has Sarah Pallen in the most unbelievable role. Clearly, Bazell doesn't think much of the former govenor. It's based on the same main character as Grim Reaper. The narrator on the audio book is hysterical. Prancer, if you haven't read this one yet, you need to get it.

IceAlisa
04-15-2012, 09:04 AM
Has anyone read David Foster Wallace's Everything and more: a compact history of infinity?

I ask because my relationship with math is tricky--I am awful at arithmetics, tend to transpose numbers and frequently have trouble with simplest of calculations but really enjoyed calculus because of its applicability to real life. Maths as it is always seemed dead and dry to me. So I didn't get past calculus and am wondering how much I would be able to get out of the book. Seems like something for MIT graduates.

What about Infinite Jest?