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michiruwater
03-19-2012, 12:00 AM
I was stunned, in my 17th-century poetry class, to read the f-word in poems by the Earl of Rochester, aka John Wilmot. And an entire poem about premature ejaculation. And impotence. And his anger at his "prick" (another word I figured was a much more recent invention) for not doing its job properly. I am NOT making this up!

Well, I know what I'm reading next :lol:

rjblue
03-19-2012, 12:32 AM
This is interesting. No wonder we like descriptive language. Your brain on fiction. (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/18/opinion/sunday/the-neuroscience-of-your-brain-on-fiction.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1)

Spinner
03-21-2012, 03:56 AM
The new book I'm trying to make everyone read is Stephen Dau's debut, The Book of Jonas (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12528627-the-book-of-jonas). So so so wonderful, a wrenching tale of loss and healing.

zaphyre14
03-21-2012, 06:13 PM
I'm cleaning out my basement and over the weekend I found three boxes of paperback all published in the late '70s. Mostly old Regency's and some (really bad) science fiction and young adult stuff (probably left over from when I used to pre-read my godchildren's choices). I'm guessing they were meant for a yard sale since none of my favorite authors are in there.

So I posted a bunch of them on the book swap site and overnight I've had six of them requested. Maybe they aren't so obscure as I thought they were.

I did pull out a few that looked interesting but I don't feel obligated to finish them if I don't care for them. I've already gotten rid of them once.

Avi's "Crispin and the Cross of Lead" fell off a shelf onto my head over the weekend. For a while I collected the current Newbury Award winners, which is why I probably picked this up, but I'd never read. So I took the knock on the noggin as a sign and read the darn thing. I have to say I have no clue why this won. It's an okay story but I can't imagine handing it to a young reader and expecting them to get into it And there's not that much of a plot to get into.

I'm now progressing to James Patterson's "Witch & Wizard" series thanks to the woman and her kids who blocked the aisle at the grocery store and got me stuck next to the periodicals display.

Prancer
03-21-2012, 06:35 PM
Avi's "Crispin and the Cross of Lead" fell off a shelf onto my head over the weekend. For a while I collected the current Newbury Award winners, which is why I probably picked this up, but I'd never read. So I took the knock on the noggin as a sign and read the darn thing. I have to say I have no clue why this won. It's an okay story but I can't imagine handing it to a young reader and expecting them to get into it And there's not that much of a plot to get into.

My son liked that one quite a lot when he was maybe 10 or 11. But he loved anything by Avi.

Zemgirl
03-21-2012, 06:43 PM
I'm cleaning out my basement and over the weekend I found three boxes of paperback all published in the late '70s. Mostly old Regency's and some (really bad) science fiction and young adult stuff (probably left over from when I used to pre-read my godchildren's choices). I'm guessing they were meant for a yard sale since none of my favorite authors are in there.

So I posted a bunch of them on the book swap site and overnight I've had six of them requested. Maybe they aren't so obscure as I thought they were.

If you're looking to get the regencies to a good home, you might want to contact one of the romance novels sites - Smart Bitches, Trashy Books could be a good one to try.

Spinner
03-21-2012, 10:28 PM
I'm cleaning out my basement and over the weekend I found three boxes of paperback all published in the late '70s. Mostly old Regency's and some (really bad) science fiction
Curious what sci-fi you have... I may take some ;)

rjblue
03-21-2012, 10:56 PM
Curious what sci-fi you have... I may take some ;)Me too.

pat c
03-23-2012, 04:50 AM
Just for booklovers, a list of what this guy thinks are his fav bookstores. I've been to two of them and yes they are heaven for readers:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-other-destinations/the-best-bookstores-in-north-america/article2376929/

IceAlisa
03-23-2012, 04:59 AM
I am here to rant about The Blind Assassin. I am about half-way done and can't help but notice the similarities with her The Edible Woman. TEW is Atwood's early work and one of my favorites but the ideas and devices are considerably less fresh in TBA.

The theme of the woman being objectified, not having a voice (literally not having a tongue this time around), not owning self (referring to self in third person) are worthwhile subjects but she's done this before in almost the same way. Another thing is this compulsive and symbolic inability to eat meat, to consume. Done before and done better in TEW.

I do appreciate the novel within the novel within the novel idea but her love story is stilted and doesn't come naturally to her--as I've said, may be there's a reason for it since I haven't yet finished.

So I like some of it and don't like other parts. I feel like she is plagiarizing herself.

IceAlisa
03-23-2012, 05:00 AM
I am here to rant about The Blind Assassin. I am about half-way done and can't help but notice the similarities with her The Edible Woman. TEW is Atwood's early work and one of my favorites but the ideas and devices are considerably less fresh in TBA.

The theme of the woman being objectified, not having a voice (literally not having a tongue this time around), not owning self (referring to self in third person) are worthwhile subjects but she's done this before in almost exactly same way. Another thing is this compulsive and symbolic inability to eat meat, to consume. Done before and done better in TEW.

I do appreciate the novel within the novel within the novel idea but her love story is stilted and doesn't come naturally to her--as I've said, may be there's a reason for it since I haven't yet finished.

So I like some of it and don't like other parts. I feel like she is plagiarizing herself.

Artemis@BC
03-23-2012, 06:46 PM
Well, I finished Death Comes to Pemberley, and I was quite disappointed. I was finding it reasonably enjoyable for the first 2/3 or so, and though that she'd captured the tone nicely. It was also interesting to infer her favourite characters from Pride and Prejudice, based on how she wrote them in this book.

But then, holy exposition batman, the last chunk was terrible! I lost count of how many 6-page-long speeches there were to cram all the content and resolution in at the end. And the :rolleyes: eye-rollingness of that content! Oy. I expected better from James, who does actually know how to write a murder mystery.

So now I'm reading The Zen of Zombie: Better Living Through the Undead, which I picked up for .50 at the library. I'm not a zombie fanatic by any stretch, but it's still :lol:.

LilJen
03-23-2012, 08:59 PM
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Pretty silly, all told. Some good silly but plenty of bad, poorly thought out silly. Fortunately, I received it as a gift. Actually I think the "book discussion questions" at the end are the funniest.

Now in the middle of The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje. Pretty good so far!

LilJen
03-23-2012, 09:01 PM
Just for booklovers, a list of what this guy thinks are his fav bookstores. I've been to two of them and yes they are heaven for readers:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-other-destinations/the-best-bookstores-in-north-america/article2376929/

YES YES YES to Powells and the Elliott Bay Book Co--the only two on that list I've ever been to. (although, wait, EB isn't in Capitol Hill, unless it moved? Last I knew it was right in the heart of Pioneer Square.)

Spinner
03-23-2012, 10:21 PM
Just for booklovers, a list of what this guy thinks are his fav bookstores. I've been to two of them and yes they are heaven for readers:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-other-destinations/the-best-bookstores-in-north-america/article2376929/

I've heard that many people :swoon: :swoon: :swoon: their first time in Denver's Tattered Cover. I'm sure I would too!