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PrincessLeppard
03-13-2012, 02:50 AM
I'm about halfway through Divergent, and I really like it. Hopefully, it won't begin to fall apart like Matched and the Knife of Never Letting Go.

Artemis@BC
03-13-2012, 04:27 PM
Well, as usually happens when I'm not paying close enough attention to my library holds, 2 came in at once. However one is Jacqueline Kennedy: Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy, which came in both book and CD version. So I'm skipping the book version and just listening to the audio, which is more engaging anyway.

The other is Death Comes to Pemberley. I like how James begins with a caveat -- if she'd wanted this story written, Austen would have written herself, and would have done it better. Nothing like starting by lowering your readers' expectations! However, despite that, I am enjoying it so far. At first I thought the recap of P&P was somewhat pointless (really, is there anyone reading this book who hasn't read, or at the very least seen, Pride and Prejudice?), but the way it was told -- from the pov of the gossipy ladies of Meryton recounting how Elizabeth had schemed and plotted -- was amusing. Anyway, I'm keeping an open mind, and my expectations suitably lowered.

Wyliefan
03-13-2012, 05:35 PM
I've not had good luck with the two books I checked out from the library recently. Both had come highly recommended but I didn't enjoy either. The first was The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde. I love the TV series Doctor Who, about time travel and aliens, and this book was said to be in the same vein. It does have a ton of great ideas in it but the execution is abysmal. It's poorly written, badly in need of an editor, with a plot that meanders into tons of pointless digressions, no humor at all, concepts that seem shoehorned in just so the author can show off how clever he is, an Alternate Universe that is set up poorly, and a villain and heroine who were boring as hell and had no characterization. I read the whole thing waiting for it to start delivering on its promise, and it never did.

The second novel, which I stopped reading halfway through, is Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers, a mystery set in early twentieth century Oxford. This is much better written than The Eyre Affair, but again the main character isn't all that likeable, the central mystery is not compelling and the pace is too slow and rambling, with loooong digressions into feminism, the role of women in academia in the 1930s etc coming at the expense of developing the mystery itself. The language is too ornate. There are too many characters, that the author refers to alternately with their names and their titles within Oxford, and it becomes really hard to keep track of who everyone is. The main character is in love with an aristocratic detective who is so perfect that he becomes a Gary Stu, and she keeps rejecting his marriage proposals for no reason that I can see.

Before I was disappointed with these two novels, I had read for the second time the His Dark Materials trilogy by Phillip Pullman. Now THAT is a fab book, with great characters, a kick ass plot, and a very thought-provoking examination of organized religion.

Based on this, you and I have absolutely zero in common when it comes to literature. :lol: I love Jasper Fforde's books and hated His Dark Materials, and Gaudy Night is my second favorite novel of all time.

emason
03-13-2012, 08:31 PM
Based on this, you and I have absolutely zero in common when it comes to literature. :lol: I love Jasper Fforde's books and hated His Dark Materials, and Gaudy Night is my second favorite novel of all time.

I couldn't get past page 100 of the first Pullman book. Could not stand it. I'm with you on this one (and Gaudy Night).

Evilynn
03-14-2012, 10:37 AM
I couldn't get past page 100 of the first Pullman book. Could not stand it. I'm with you on this one (and Gaudy Night).

And I was a bit :blah: about both The Eyre Affair and His Dark Materials. ;)

Ajax
03-16-2012, 09:28 PM
Oh no! His Dark Materials vs. Gaudy Night death match! :lol:

rjblue
03-18-2012, 03:55 AM
I loved His Dark Materials.

I don't think I've ever read a mystery genre book cover to cover. I always read a few chapters and skip to the end. I haven't even attempted one in 30 years.

Spinner
03-18-2012, 05:11 AM
Heads up folks, this Monday March 19 you can download Fever Moon (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/947475.Fever_Moon) by Carolyn Haines for free on your Nook or Kindle--one day only.

IceAlisa
03-18-2012, 05:29 AM
Still reading The Blind Assasin. I find the love story (the novel within the novel) a bit stilted and not a good example of Atwood's writing. So far it's two dimensional but perhaps that's the intention? I will keep reading.

michiruwater
03-18-2012, 08:56 PM
I'm halfway through Candide and completely perplexed that this sort of book was allowed back then.

I'm also about 1/4 of the way through Moby Dick. I haven't picked it up in a few days though, which feels like a bad sign. I should get back to it, but I suppose I always imagined that when I finally did get around to it on my list it would be a lot more enthralling than it is so far, supposedly being among the greatest novels written in English.

I also have to constantly look up all the 18th-century vocabulary words. It's a little tiring. I'm considered to have a fairly large vocabulary, but going by modern standards I knew that didn't say much, and this book proves it.

Wyliefan
03-18-2012, 09:25 PM
Enthralling is not a word I would ever use in connection with Melville. :shuffle:


Oh no! His Dark Materials vs. Gaudy Night death match! :lol:

Team Sayers!! :cheer2:

Prancer
03-18-2012, 10:25 PM
I'm also about 1/4 of the way through Moby Dick. I haven't picked it up in a few days though, which feels like a bad sign. I should get back to it, but I suppose I always imagined that when I finally did get around to it on my list it would be a lot more enthralling than it is so far, supposedly being among the greatest novels written in English.

Even Melville thought it was a boring book.

I didn't, surprisingly, but part of that may have been that I had to read it for class and class discussion tended to center around all the jokes. In case you haven't noticed, Melville lurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrved him some phallic humor. It got so just saying Moby Dick made me snicker.

TygerLily
03-18-2012, 10:54 PM
My librarians are on strike. :wuzrobbed

(Actually, on the unselfish note, :kickass: for them, but :wuzrobbed ! I suppose there's always Worlds to entertain me.)

LilJen
03-18-2012, 11:45 PM
I'm halfway through Candide and completely perplexed that this sort of book was allowed back then.

I was stunned, in my 17th-century poetry class, to read the f-word in poems by the Earl of Rochester, aka John Wilmot. And an entire poem about premature ejaculation. And impotence. And his anger at his "prick" (another word I figured was a much more recent invention) for not doing its job properly. I am NOT making this up!

rfisher
03-18-2012, 11:51 PM
Heads up folks, this Monday March 19 you can download Fever Moon (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/947475.Fever_Moon) by Carolyn Haines for free on your Nook or Kindle--one day only.

Rats. I've already read it, but it is very good and completely different from her Sarah Booth Delany books. There is a new SBD coming out this summer. :)

Sadly, most of the free books I downloaded are of the "you get what you pay for" quality. :P