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pilgrimsoul
02-06-2012, 03:07 PM
My in-laws are about an hour out of Pittsburgh & my MIL often uses the term "yinz" as in "When are yinz going to the store?" It's basically the Pittsburgh equivalent of "y'all."

milanessa
02-06-2012, 03:11 PM
"Fluff a nutter" - A peanut-butter and marshmellow sandwich. Is that really a regional thing?



The pronunciation may be but not the sandwich. It's printed on every jar of Marshmallow Fluff. We called it (in WNY) a fluffer nutter.

gkelly
02-06-2012, 03:20 PM
The evening mean can be either supper or dinner.

In generic instances I use both words interchangeably. But I'm more likely to say "dinner" if it's a major sit-down meal with other people (I live alone) and "supper" if it's late evening, just me, on the go, etc.

emason
02-06-2012, 04:18 PM
I think of supper/dinner as a generational thing. My Grandparents/Mom said supper, I say dinner.

Where I am from it depends on the type, size of the meal. If your family has their big meal of the day at lunch time then you have a smaller meal, supper, in the evening. If lunch is the smaller meal and the big meal of the day is in the evening, then you have dinner.

Vagabond
02-06-2012, 04:41 PM
Here's a funny Pop vs. Soda (http://popvssoda.com/) Page across America.

According to the map, I live in an area where people mostly use the term "soda," but most people I know around here would say "soft drink." When I hear a reference to drinking "soda," the first thing I think of is club soda.

Jenny
02-06-2012, 05:19 PM
When I was a kid, it was always "pop" - we even had a chain of stores called The Pop Shoppe. When I was about 12 I had a friend who had moved to town from Boston by way of Florida, and that was the first time I heard "soda."

I think on this point and many other localisms, popular culture has blurred a lot of the lines. Now I hear "soda," "soft drink" (I think McDonald's might have popularized that one) or specific brands (notably Coke) used as much if not more than "pop."

For that matter, among my crowd, such a product is usually referred to as "mix." :P

Ozzisk8tr
02-06-2012, 05:31 PM
A few more from Oz. Elastic band = Lackie band. Chewing gum = chewie.

Louis
02-06-2012, 06:24 PM
The Philadelphianism that drives me crazy is "where you AT?" (shortened to whereyatttt) instead of "where are you?" Like nails on a chalkboard. Hydro is right about "do you know what I mean?" In some ethnic communities, it has been shortened even more to something that sounds like "naaaaahmean." Other Philadelphianisms that drive me crazy are "gazzzz" and "goinGGGGG" (also a New Jerseyism). I get a kick out of "rah-diator," though. And "hoagie." Does that exist outside of Philadelphia?

Agree with Jenny that "waiting on line" is a weird New Yorkism. The first time I heard it, I didn't even understand what the person meant.

To me, cellar and basement are two separate things. Basement = partially below grade and often finished or able to be finished. Cellar = fully below grade and not designed for living. A house can have both a basement and a cellar. Many buildings in NYC have both.

The word "duplex" seems to have a lot of regional variation. In Philadelphia, it meant two separate horizontally stacked apartments. In New York, it means one apartment on two levels. Elsewhere, I've heard it used to described two houses side-by-side, which I knew as a "twin" in Philadelphia and a "semi-detached" in New York. This word can mean so many different but similar things that I tend not to use it at all.

Prancer
02-06-2012, 06:35 PM
When I was a kid, it was always "pop" - we even had a chain of stores called The Pop Shoppe. When I was about 12 I had a friend who had moved to town from Boston by way of Florida, and that was the first time I heard "soda."

I think on this point and many other localisms, popular culture has blurred a lot of the lines. Now I hear "soda," "soft drink" (I think McDonald's might have popularized that one) or specific brands (notably Coke) used as much if not more than "pop."

The reason that college-educated people I know here say "soda" and non-college-educated say "pop" is, I think, that we all said "pop" growing up, then went to college and had some version of this conversation about eleventy billion times:

Me: I'm thirsty. I'm gonna grab a pop.
Chorus of voices: SODA!
Me: Yeah, pop, soda, whatever.
Chorus of voices: SODA! Pop is a sound/a type of music/something you do to bubble wrap/etc. etc.

After a while, it was easier to just say soda. I can't tell you how many people I know who made the conversion in college that way.

Every now and then, we would all have an argument about gym shoes/tennis shoes/sneakers in college, but that one wasn't nearly as bad. There is something about pop that seems to drive the soda people kind of insane.

This is what comes from mixing with Other :sekret:.

I think "Where you at?" is hilarious :shuffle:.


The word "duplex" seems to have a lot of regional variation. In Philadelphia, it meant two separate horizontally stacked apartments. In New York, it means one apartment on two levels. Elsewhere, I've heard it used to described two houses side-by-side, which I knew as a "twin" in Philadelphia and a "semi-detached" in New York. This word can mean so many different but similar things that I tend not to use it at all.

I never know what people by duplex even locally. Most people here refer to two houses with a common wall as a double. But some call that a duplex, and I've heard duplex used to describe everything in your post, too. I usually assume people mean horizontally stacked apartments, and I think that's the case more often than not, but it's not consistently so.

Aceon6
02-06-2012, 06:47 PM
I never know what people by duplex even locally. Most people here refer to two houses with a common wall as a double. But some call that a duplex, and I've heard duplex used to describe everything in your post, too. I usually assume people mean horizontally stacked apartments, and I think that's the case more often than not, but it's not consistently so.

Duplex to me is side by side. Decker is what we use for stacked as in "My mother grew up in a triple decker"

Artemis@BC
02-06-2012, 07:12 PM
I grew up with "chesterfield," but haven't used that expression for years. Now I use "couch" and "sofa" pretty much interchangeably, but sometimes I'll use "setee" instead just for fun.

I remember a local news story a few years ago when the Vancouver/BC-originated word "grow-op" had spread with enough use to make it into the Oxford dictionary. :lol: That was quite a red-letter day.

But I'd be willing to bet that few people outside of Vancouver know what a "Vancouver special" is! (And it's nothing rude or illicit ... just an offence to aesthetics.)

Nan
02-06-2012, 07:33 PM
My neighbor is from Arkansas and she says, fixin' to when she is getting ready to do something. The thing she is fixin' to do (housework, yard work, whatever) is rat killin', as in "I'm fixin' to do my rat killin' "

On my Aunt's farm in Pennsylvania, I learned that breakfast was what you ate in the morning, lunch at noon and supper in the evening Monday through Saturday. Dinner was the second of two meals eaten on Sunday, mid-afternoon.

Jenny
02-06-2012, 07:48 PM
My neighbor is from Arkansas and she says, fixin' to when she is getting ready to do something. The thing she is fixin' to do (housework, yard work, whatever) is rat killin', as in "I'm fixin' to do my rat killin' "

A friend of mine always says she's going to "make up a salad" - no idea where she got that from.

vesperholly
02-06-2012, 09:55 PM
Discovered an oddity when purchasing liquor a few years back in New York. The bottle I wanted was behind the counter, so I asked for the "40 of Stoli." Apparently liquor is one of the few instances where America has embraced the metric system, because after some confusion, he realized that I wanted the one liter bottle. Ditto what we all call a "26er" is a 750 ml.

Pop (not soda!) is also sold in 1-liter and 2-liter bottles. 2 liters are extremely common.


The reason that college-educated people I know here say "soda" and non-college-educated say "pop" is, I think, that we all said "pop" growing up, then went to college and had some version of this conversation about eleventy billion times:

Me: I'm thirsty. I'm gonna grab a pop.
Chorus of voices: SODA!
Me: Yeah, pop, soda, whatever.
Chorus of voices: SODA! Pop is a sound/a type of music/something you do to bubble wrap/etc. etc.

After a while, it was easier to just say soda. I can't tell you how many people I know who made the conversion in college that way.

Unless you went to college in an area that also says pop. :lol:

cruisin
02-06-2012, 10:35 PM
"Butt" - as in a cigarette. People will say "I'm going to smoke a butt". (Sounds really bad when you step back and consider it objectively)

People say butt around here too.


"Fluff a nutter" - A peanut-butter and marshmellow sandwich. Is that really a regional thing?

As Milanessa said, we call it that too, but say fluffer-nutter.


"Packie" - where you go to buy beer. Short for package store, although I'm not sure why liquor stores are referred to in this way.

We just call them liquor stores. i think some of the different names for liquor stores stems from the state laws and what kind of store can sell beer/wind/hard liquor. In NJ you can buy all of it in one place, but rarely can you buy any of it outside of an actual liquor store. Very few grocery stores have liquor licenses.


The Philadelphianism that drives me crazy is "where you AT?" (shortened to whereyatttt) instead of "where are you?" Like nails on a chalkboard. Hydro is right about "do you know what I mean?" In some ethnic communities, it has been shortened even more to something that sounds like "naaaaahmean." Other Philadelphianisms that drive me crazy are "gazzzz" and "goinGGGGG" (also a New Jerseyism). I get a kick out of "rah-diator," though. And "hoagie." Does that exist outside of Philadelphia?

That depends on where in NJ. We do not pronounce anything like Philadelphia does in northern NJ. We do not pronounce anything like NY does more than 15 miles west of the city. Most of NJ has newscaster pronunciation, not much of an accent, at all.


The word "duplex" seems to have a lot of regional variation. In Philadelphia, it meant two separate horizontally stacked apartments. In New York, it means one apartment on two levels. Elsewhere, I've heard it used to described two houses side-by-side, which I knew as a "twin" in Philadelphia and a "semi-detached" in New York. This word can mean so many different but similar things that I tend not to use it at all.

I think of a duplex as any two family dwelling, verticle or horizontal in layout.

I agree about the wait on line thing. I do say that, do't know why. Maybe there used to be lines pained on streets where people would typically wait "in" line. So, it became waiting on a line. Maybe I'm trying too hard :lol: