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flyingsit
02-04-2012, 09:33 PM
My husband grew up in the New Orleans suburbs and the people there use "coke" for all kinds of soda. "What kind is coke do you want?"

They also say they are making groceries instead of going grocery shopping.

Myskate
02-04-2012, 11:33 PM
Do you have a couch, a sofa or a settee? I think the Midwestern term is a couch.

stanhope
02-05-2012, 04:09 AM
Do you have a couch, a sofa or a settee? I think the Midwestern term is a couch.

Yes, in the Midwest it is a "couch." I have also heard "Davenport" or "sofa."

Grannyfan
02-05-2012, 05:08 AM
Do you have a couch, a sofa or a settee? I think the Midwestern term is a couch.

My mother always called it a divan, but I haven't heard that term in a long time.
Most people I know say couch.

KikiSashaFan
02-05-2012, 05:14 AM
I grew up in BC, Canada. We say pop, couch, dinner, flip flops, sprinkles and basement. I've never heard of bubbler or jimmies.

El Rey
02-05-2012, 05:28 AM
I live in Texas. If someone asked me where they could find a bubbler, I would think they they were looking for a marijuana pipe. Typing "bubbler" into google shows the same thing.

Ozzisk8tr
02-05-2012, 08:25 AM
I live in Texas. If someone asked me where they could find a bubbler, I would think they they were looking for a marijuana pipe. Typing "bubbler" into google shows the same thing.

Many (very very many) years ago I called mine a bubble-o-matic... :shuffle:
now I just call it a bong ;)

Wiery
02-05-2012, 12:38 PM
Another charming Alabama/blue collar southern idiom is "where you at?" instead of "Where are you?" Picture Larry the Cable Guy saying it; that's just how it sounds... :rolleyes:

NinjaTurtles
02-05-2012, 12:48 PM
Yes, in the Midwest it is a "couch." I have also heard "Davenport" or "sofa."


My mother always called it a divan, but I haven't heard that term in a long time.
Most people I know say couch.

There's a good clip of Brian on Family Guy not knowing where to place a set of keys, as he's directed to the "davenport", "divan", and "chesterfield". :lol:

Here is one my husband was talking about last night: sub vs. hoagie vs. grinder vs. hero vs. bomber vs. po' boy.

cruisin
02-05-2012, 01:45 PM
We say couch or sofa. Husband's from western PA. A few colloquialisms there. One that always makes me :confused: is "they come over last night" instead of they came over last night. They also put accents on different syllables in words.
For instance: umbrella - they put the accent on um, we put the accent on brel.

Aceon6
02-05-2012, 02:24 PM
Cellar may be more common in New England; almost everyone there has a cellar. No one has a basement.

Native New Englander here (NH to CT to MA). Gramma had a cellar, we have a basement. In my circle, cellar has a dirt or rock floor, basement has a poured floor. You store vegetables, canned items and home made wine in the cellar. Your laundry room is likely in the basement.

Surprised no one has mentioned tonic. In NH, that's soda pop. If you ask for a soda in some parts of NH, you'll get a fizzy stomach settling medicine.

cruisin
02-05-2012, 02:35 PM
Native New Englander here (NH to CT to MA). Gramma had a cellar, we have a basement. In my circle, cellar has a dirt or rock floor, basement has a poured floor. You store vegetables, canned items and home made wine in the cellar. Your laundry room is likely in the basement.

Yes, that's my understanding too. My grandma had a cellar, it had a partly dirt/rock floor and she stored canned goods, and my grandfather made & stored wine (and a lot of vinegar :lol:) down there.


Surprised no one has mentioned tonic. In NH, that's soda pop. If you ask for a soda in some parts of NH, you'll get a fizzy stomach settling medicine.

I think of tonic as the bitter, carbonated soda that you put in with gin.

Jenny
02-05-2012, 02:36 PM
Do you have a couch, a sofa or a settee? I think the Midwestern term is a couch.

I remember hearing chesterfield a lot as a kid. Nowadays I only hear sofa and couch (southern Ontario).

cruisin
02-05-2012, 02:39 PM
^^ I wonder if Chesterfield was a brand name or a specific style for a couch. It could have been a brand name that became a generic, like Kleenex for tissues.

emason
02-05-2012, 02:39 PM
Our cellar had a poured floor, not a dirt one. We referred to it as the cellar; we never used the word basement. Don't know why, but it was the cellar, not the basement.

ETA: Maybe it has to do with the age of the homes. My hometown, founded in 1654, had mostly older homes - all with cellars. Newer homes, circa 1950s post WWII, had basements, finished or otherwise.