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Prancer
02-04-2012, 10:24 AM
Hey, Prancer, you offered anecdotal evidence, and I did the same. What's the prob? :confused:

Aside from the fact that I specified that I was referring to usage "around here" in the case of pop and soda and education levels, which I did because I am aware that this is not widespread, nothing :confused:. Just offering more anecdotal evidence in response.

I wondered where your dad was from because Ohio has four distinctly different accents and some idioms that go with them. One of the things you said makes me think he's from northeastern Ohio, but "cellar" is kind of throwing me.

John 3 17
02-04-2012, 10:40 AM
...I wondered where your dad was from because Ohio has four distinctly different accents and some idioms that go with them. One of the things you said makes me think he's from northeastern Ohio, but "cellar" is kind of throwing me.

Dad's from the Toledo area, so northwestern OH.

julieann
02-04-2012, 11:06 AM
And you live around here, too?

We should all meet!

I'm not sure where 'around here' is...if you are talking Minnesota, no I move to Arizona 5 years ago.

Here's a funny Pop vs. Soda (http://popvssoda.com/) Page across America.

OrioleBeagle
02-04-2012, 11:12 AM
I'm from Maryland. While visiting a cousin in Iowa, I asked a grocery store employee where the "soda" machine was. They looked at me with a very confused look on their face. They finally figured out I wanted the "pop" machine!

OrioleBeagle
02-04-2012, 11:25 AM
People from the City of Baltimore refer to going to Ocean City, Maryland as "going down the Ocean".

John 3 17
02-04-2012, 12:08 PM
My grandfather was raised in Chicago itself and he had expressions we didn't use in the suburbs. He would say, "chuck it" for "throw it out/away".


I should add that my grandfather more than likely got "chuck it" from his Irish parents (I've read Irish books with the expression in them), but with so many Irish in Chicago, sometimes there's no difference between something from Ireland or something from Chicago :lol:

Lurking Skater
02-04-2012, 12:33 PM
I've lived in southern Illinois all my life and have never heard of a bubbler, it was always a water fountain or maye a drinking fountain. The large, decorative fountains are just called fountains. We have soda down here. It become pop somewhere northern in the state.

Wiery
02-04-2012, 12:57 PM
I live in Alabama, and a lot of people here say "I"m fixin' to..." instead of "I'm going to," or "I'm about to..."

...and I have heard the term "bubbler," but it was specifically in reference to my 8 year-old's bathtime activities.

stanhope
02-04-2012, 01:16 PM
The Midwest does have a wide range of idioms. I grew up saying "pop" and "sack" instead of "soda" and "bag." Also, in some areas of the Midwest you bring a "casserole" to a potluck and in other areas you bring a "hot dish."

Jenny
02-04-2012, 02:40 PM
Anyone else ever tried to use FSUisms in real life? And then you have to explain that it came from a figure skating forum? :lol:

I use tiff and void all the time, and my husband has picked them up too ("the cat is voiding around upstairs," and "I'll be home at 6:30 so there's time to get tiffed up before we go out").




Buffalo English (http://nycbbb.com/feature/buffaloenglish.htm) is well documented. One of my favorite bits is how to pronounce Toronto. If it's more than one syllable, you're doing it wrong. An episode of Alias referenced Buffalo State, which exactly no one calls it. Buff State.

Actually it's two syllables - Traw-no or Traw-na :) That is how natives pronounce it, as well as our neighbours across the falls.

Susan1
02-04-2012, 02:57 PM
I've heard it regularly in IL, WI, and MN. http://www.law.wisc.edu/blogs/wisblawg/2007/12/origins_of_the_bubbler.html

Maybe it's just an upper Midwest thing

Could be. Never heard it in Ohio.

Susan1
02-04-2012, 03:07 PM
How does one order a pop? Don't you just say "I'll have a Coke/Sprite/Pepsi/Dr Pepper/Mountain Dew/anything else"? Or do you say "What kind of pop do you have?"?

I'm pretty sure that double question mark is wrong but it seems so right. :rofl:

Now that so many fast food restaurants have self service "pop" stations, I just order a medium drink (and get the cup). If you are at a sit down restaurant, you order the specific thing off the menu. And if I'm not looking at a menu, I think I usually say "What kind of soft drinks do you have?". But in general terms, I call it all "pop" (Ohio). On my grocery list I will write "decaf pop".

(p.s. I'm a "grammartician", and I still forget how to use punctuation marks with quotation marks!!!)

AnnieD
02-04-2012, 03:28 PM
I should add that my grandfather more than likely got "chuck it" from his Irish parents (I've read Irish books with the expression in them), but with so many Irish in Chicago, sometimes there's no difference between something from Ireland or something from Chicago :lol:

I'd say "chuck it" or "chuck it in the bucket" to throw something away. Don't know if it's a Scottish or Irish thing!

cruisin
02-04-2012, 03:56 PM
Another one from my childhood is "jimmies". I don't hear it that much anymore. But it's the same as "sprinkles" that you put on icecream. I'd go to DQ and ask for a vanilla cone with "rainbow jimmies". IIRC, Rhode Island's word for sprinkles is "shots", but I don't know if I'm remembering that right.

Usually, here (NJ) we say sprinkles, but jimmies is acceptable too.


I've always lived in the South, and I don't think that's true everywhere. I use the word "lovely" with its actual meaning. It can be used with sarcasm, but mostly it just means what is says. :)

I think lovely with sarcasm is pretty universal. There are lots of superlatives that can be used with a sarcastic tone that end up meaning the opposite of what their definition is.


"Catty-corner" as in "Their house is catty-corner from ours," means it's not directly across but more diagonally across.

I don't know if that is so much regional, as it is old fashioned :). My grandmother said catty corner, my Mom did sometimes, but you rarely hear it said anymore.


A beauty operator is a hair stylist. This one must have fallen out of use because my daughter laughed like crazy the first time she heard me use the term.

I would say stylist, that's what they are. How about beauty parlor as opposed to salon? Again, I think beauty parlor is just an old fashioned term, salon is more current.


My best friend is from Appleton, Wisconsin, and said bubbler when we met in college. She also said "ralph" as a verb for throwing up, and on one memorable instance she "ralphed in the bubbler" which became a catchphrase :lol:

I think words like that are typically college words. "Ralph", "blow cookies", "pray to the porcelain Gods" - all things I first heard in the dorm. :lol:



Other phrases we say differently are: we say "garbage can", he says "trash can", we say "basement" and he says "cellar" (well, not so often anymore, even he says basement more often than not -- we've gotten to him!). Regional phrases are fun to learn about :)
-Bridget

I'm with Prancer on this one - trash can or waste basket in the house, garbage can is the big one (in the garage) for outside pick-up. We say basement. To me cellar is an older term or used for an underground storage area - e.g. wine cellar.



My grandfather was raised in Chicago itself and he had expressions we didn't use in the suburbs. He would say, "chuck it" for "throw it out/away".

I know in MN as well as where I'm from we say "scoot" for "move", as in "scoot over so I can sit next to you", or "scoot, you're in the way!"

Chuck it is not common here, but if you said it, it would be understood. I say scoot over. I just think it sounds nicer than move over :).

emason
02-04-2012, 05:19 PM
Cellar may be more common in New England; almost everyone there has a cellar. No one has a basement.