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milanessa
02-04-2012, 12:12 AM
Although I do get funny looks when I order a pop in Arizona.

How does one order a pop? Don't you just say "I'll have a Coke/Sprite/Pepsi/Dr Pepper/Mountain Dew/anything else"? Or do you say "What kind of pop do you have?"?

I'm pretty sure that double question mark is wrong but it seems so right. :rofl:

mkats
02-04-2012, 12:12 AM
I've never heard of a bubbler (grew up just outside D.C.) I did have a friend in college from Pennsylvania who used to refer to Secret Santa exchanges as "Pollyannas"

Anyone else ever tried to use FSUisms in real life? And then you have to explain that it came from a figure skating forum? :lol:

julieann
02-04-2012, 12:25 AM
How does one order a pop? Don't you just say "I'll have a Coke/Sprite/Pepsi/Dr Pepper/Mountain Dew/anything else"? Or do you say "What kind of pop do you have?"?

I'm pretty sure that double question mark is wrong but it seems so right. :rofl:

You do have to be specific if the situation calls for it but if I'm at someone's house and they ask what I would like to drink I say pop. The term pop/soda just comes up in normal conversation just as coffee would. I normally just say coffee instead of a double mocha chai latte just to make it easier. If more clarification is needed, they will ask me.

But I still would say soda, I refuse to change my pop roots are too deep.

znachki
02-04-2012, 12:27 AM
Here's a dictionary of regional english. http://dare.wisc.edu/

In Seattle, you can always tell a Californian beause they'll say "the 5", when speaking of the Interstate, which we call " I 5". Locally Mt. Rainier is just "the mountain".

Also, what do you call the little dust balls under your bed? That's often very regional.

milanessa
02-04-2012, 12:27 AM
You do have to be specific if the situation calls for it but if I'm at someone's house and they ask what I would like to drink I say pop. The term pop/soda just comes up in normal conversation just as coffee would. I normally just say coffee instead of a double mocha chai latte just to make it easier. If more clarification is needed, they will ask me.



Got it. :) When you said order I immediately thought of a restaurant.

milanessa
02-04-2012, 12:28 AM
Also, what do you call the little dust balls under your bed? That's often very regional.

My little pony just fainted.

HisWeirness
02-04-2012, 12:47 AM
The one that always gives away a New Yorker is that they say "on line" instead of "in line," as in, "I was waiting on line to buy a movie ticket." Never heard anyone else use that phrase that way.
:lol: I am originally from NY and I never realized that this was an unusual way of speaking. Oh, and as crusin said, you always go to the City.

Living in NC now, my classic test between NC natives and transplants is to ask them what toboggan means.

Technically (in an engineering sense :COP:) a roundabout is a different type of circular intersection from a traffic circle/rotary.

From (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_circle) wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roundabout):

In the U.S., traffic engineers use the term roundabout for intersections in which entering traffic must yield to traffic already in the circle, reserving the term traffic circle for those in which entering traffic is controlled by stop signs, traffic signals, or is not formally controlled.
...
In the U.S., many people use the terms "roundabout", "traffic circle", and "rotary" interchangeably, and they are defined as synonyms in dictionaries. Many old traffic circles remain in the northeastern US. Since many of the older junction forms have unfavourable safety records, transportation professionals are careful to use "roundabout" when referring to newer designs and "traffic circle" or "rotary" when referring to ones that do not meet the criteria listed above.

Oh, and a NJ Jughandle and a Michigan Left are not the same thing, but they are both types of "alternative intersections" that provide ways of dealing with those pesky left turns drivers make :P. This article (http://www.npr.org/2011/08/02/138930846/plan-eliminates-left-turns-in-u-s-intersections) does a decent job of explaining alternative intersections and has links demonstrating jughandles and michigan lefts (as well as the Diverging (or Double Crossover) Diamond :glamor: interchange).

GarrAarghHrumph
02-04-2012, 01:02 AM
Wicked is definitely not local to Boston. I've heard it used in various parts of North America for decades, and as someone else said it's common in the UK too.

The people in eastern Massachusetts use the term "wicked" in unusual ways, and far, far more often than I've ever heard anyone outside the area use it. Although it is used outside of Mass., in Mass., it's used a wicked, wicked lot. I've never heard it used as wicked often as in that region. On a scale of one to wicked, seriously, it's, like, a wicked pissah word to use. ;)



We refer to NYC as "the City". Every other city gets a name. Subs are subs, not grinders or hoagies. Sloppy Joes are ground meat with a ketchup sauce on a hamburger bun, they are also triple decker sandwiches with meat, cheese, cole slaw and russian dressing, on 3 slices of rye bread.

When we used to go in to Boston, we went "in Town". In Boston, a "triple decker" is actually a specific type of house with three apartments in it, one on each floor.

GarrAarghHrumph
02-04-2012, 01:03 AM
Also, what do you call the little dust balls under your bed? That's often very regional.

Dust bunnies.

cruisin
02-04-2012, 01:05 AM
In Seattle, you can always tell a Californian beause they'll say "the 5", when speaking of the Interstate, which we call " I 5".

In NJ we'll just say - take 78W/E or take Rt. 78W/E.


Also, what do you call the little dust balls under your bed? That's often very regional.

Dust bunnies :D


This article (http://www.npr.org/2011/08/02/138930846/plan-eliminates-left-turns-in-u-s-intersections) does a decent job of explaining alternative intersections and has links demonstrating jughandles and michigan lefts (as well as the Diverging (or Double Crossover) Diamond :glamor: interchange).

I love the jug handle video, especially the one at night. :lol:

zigletto
02-04-2012, 01:13 AM
I carry a pocket-book in which I keep the money that I use to pay for my wicked pissa milk-shake (which is milk and flavoring, shaken, as opposed to a frappe which contains ice cream).

I used the words 'wicked' & 'mental' in while teaching a class in San Francisco and was immediately asked where in Boston I grew up! Guilty!!!!

cruisin
02-04-2012, 01:29 AM
I carry a pocket-book in which I keep the money that I use to pay for my wicked pissa milk-shake (which is milk and flavoring, shaken, as opposed to a frappe which contains ice cream).

I used the words 'wicked' & 'mental' in while teaching a class in San Francisco and was immediately asked where in Boston I grew up! Guilty!!!!

My Mom used to call it a pocket-book, she lived her whole life in NJ. I call it a purse.

snoopysnake
02-04-2012, 01:33 AM
People say bubbler in the Midwest too. Actually, I hear bubbler more in the Midwest than in the NE, so maybe it depends.

Wicked I think is more of a British expression, but Boston has adopted a few British customs over the years.

Binky for pacifiers I think is regionally specific. So also is mamaw and papaw for grandparents. In the NE, you hear roundabouts instead of traffic circles.

I'm from Boston and we don't say roundabout or traffic circle, we say "rotary." BTW, it's pronounced "bubblah."

Bostonfan
02-04-2012, 01:40 AM
Another one from my childhood is "jimmies". I don't hear it that much anymore. But it's the same as "sprinkles" that you put on icecream. I'd go to DQ and ask for a vanilla cone with "rainbow jimmies". IIRC, Rhode Island's word for sprinkles is "shots", but I don't know if I'm remembering that right.

Kruss
02-04-2012, 01:42 AM
Is it only here in Chicago that we have front rooms? (Or, as we pronounce it, "frunchroom".)

Everyone here calls it "pop", but I started saying soda mainly because I saw a ditzy character on the show Vega$ when I was a kid, and she kept saying, "can I have a POP?" I thought she sounded so unintelligent that I began that day saying "soda".

Chicago's commuter train is called The L (for "elevated", I believe), The Lake is obvious, "The Cell" is U.S. Cellular Field where the Sox play, and we have two names for our expressways (the Kennedy or 90, the Edens or 94, the Tri-State or294, The Ike or 290).