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Erica Lee
02-13-2012, 05:54 AM
The "bless your heart" discussion reminds me of this:

Speak English in 3 Words: http://youtu.be/6mUJ2QiXjVs

Reuven
02-13-2012, 11:10 AM
I never knew the word "chotchkies" until I heard it on one of the HGTV programs. Down here we call them "what-nots."
"Tchotchkies" is Yiddish, like "chazzerai" ;)

cruisin
02-13-2012, 02:09 PM
Nah, on it's own isn't how it would be used. It would be something like "That Spinner boy takes after his daddy's uncle, bless his heart."

And everyone would know they're talking about the village idiot.

One I used to hear a lot was if a young woman was a bit overweight. They'd just say "She has such a pretty face, bless her heart." Implicit in that was that she was unattractive due to being overweight.

You mean, I tried to make a joke and didn't know how to use the expression? :slink away

Spinner, you know I was just kidding, right?


I never knew the word "chotchkies" until I heard it on one of the HGTV programs. Down here we call them "what-nots."

That is a Yiddish word. Oh, Reuven already said that, sorry :)

milanessa
02-13-2012, 02:52 PM
You mean, I tried to make a joke and didn't know how to use the expression? :slink away



To be expected - you're from New Jersey. ;)

GarrAarghHrumph
02-13-2012, 02:59 PM
I learned very quickly once I moved out of Northeastern US that Yiddish sayings are not generally known outside that region, with specific regional exceptions - never mind outside the US. I remember having to explain "tuckus" to someone I worked with in Ireland, who'd never heard the term, never heard any other Yiddish, and didn't know what Yiddish was. With me not knowing that it wasn't a term that everyone knew and used, because where I was from, everyone did. :lol:

cruisin
02-13-2012, 03:07 PM
I learned very quickly once I moved out of Northeastern US that Yiddish sayings are not generally known outside that region, with specific regional exceptions - never mind outside the US. I remember having to explain "tuckus" to someone I worked with in Ireland, who'd never heard the term, never heard any other Yiddish, and didn't know what Yiddish was. With me not knowing that it wasn't a term that everyone knew and used, because where I was from, everyone did. :lol:

I think, especially in the New york area. I thought everyone used the word schmuck, for an obnoxious, twit. But, outside of this area, many have never heard it. Of course, I didn't know, until college, what the literal translation is :lol:.

BTW, I LOVE your signature! :rofl:

GarrAarghHrumph
02-13-2012, 03:16 PM
Also, in Scotland & Ireland, I was asked more than once if I was from Australia - and I'm from Seattle

People from the US tend to have broad vowels, which to some people from the UK and Ireland make us sound like we're from Australia. Even more so for me, because I am also non-rhotive, being from Boston.


Many, many years ago, I was on the phone with someone in New York and he said I had a midwestern accent (excuse me, a New Yorker saying *I* had an accent?). Anyway, I said Ohio's the only state that doesn't have ANY accent! ha ha ha

Ohio has a very strong accent to me, especially in and near Cleveland. It's very mid-western to my ear. Flat vowels, a bit nasal.


"Bubbler" is one of those words that I've known existed since I was an early teen, but I never heard anyone actually say until a couple of years ago. I nearly peed my pants with excitement the first time I heard someone (a Bostonian) say he was going to the "bubblah" for a drink.

I will happily say bubblah for you next time we have a NYC get-together. :D

cruisin
02-13-2012, 03:22 PM
I will happily say bubblah for you next time we have a NYC get-together. :D

Now wait, isn't that a grandmother? (I know it's bubala, but I've heard it pronounced like bubblah ;))

triplelooped
02-13-2012, 03:27 PM
Bless your heart can have several meanings, with the true meaning being conveyed by tone of voice and facial expression. Bless your heart with the emphasis on the bless said in a condescending voice means basically you're a f****** idiot. One of my friends from New Jersey said that she would just say "you're a f****** idiot." My response: "So would we, just not in polite company." Always that Southern veneer of politeness :D

Bless your heart said with a very sincere facial expression and the emphasis more on the work heart is an expression of sympathy or of poor you.

Spinner
02-13-2012, 04:18 PM
Spinner, you know I was just kidding, right?

:fragile:

znachki
02-13-2012, 05:00 PM
Originally Posted by znachki: Also, in Scotland & Ireland, I was asked more than once if I was from Australia - and I'm from Seattle


People from the US tend to have broad vowels, which to some people from the UK and Ireland make us sound like we're from Australia. Even more so for me, because I am also non-rhotive, being from Boston.

When it happened, it struck me as funny, since so many Americans can't differentiate the various accents in rest of the English speaking world. But I'd never thought about it working in reverse.