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cruisin
02-08-2012, 07:01 PM
The other one I couldn't believe was the "needs [verb]" without "to be" in between. Had heard it existed for years but never observed in real speech. Then one day, I heard someone who grew up in Western PA say, "the door needs fixed," and I was :eek: that it does, in fact, exist.

:lol: my husband is from western PA. This morning he said to me "my underwear needs washed". The man is a lawyer, he is articulate, and he's lived in NJ for 40 years, but :lol:. Not only is there no "to be", the word wash is past tense. :lol: I said this up thread, he also says "they come over last night" instead of came over. His mother used to call bologna "jumbo". I had no idea what she wanted. I teased her for it. The next week she sent me a tear out from the newspaper, advertising jumbo on sale :lol:

Spinner
02-08-2012, 07:12 PM
His mother used to call bologna "jumbo". I had no idea what she wanted. I tested her for it. The next week she sent me a tear out from the newspaper, advertising jumbo on sale :lol:

Jumbo? :lol:

skatingfan5
02-08-2012, 07:23 PM
Jumbo? :lol:Yes, even the Wikipedia entry on bologna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bologna_sausage) allows that:
In Pittsburgh and the surrounding area of southwestern Pennsylvania it is called jumbo.

ETA: Apparently you can lay the blame for the "needs + past participle construction" on the language of the early Scots-Irish settlers of the region around Pittsburgh. At least you can if the wiki on "Pittsburgh English" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsburgh_English) is accurate.

Marge_Simpson
02-08-2012, 07:55 PM
I remember taking a Dutch colleague to Boston and having him ask me what language the people in the train station were speaking. He refused to believe it was English. We were in business meetings, and he literally could not understand what people were saying..

New Yorkers have trouble understanding Bostonians, too. There's a conductor on Metro-North who is obviously a transplant. It's hysterical to hear him announce, "Passengers for Woodlawn must be in the first four cahs", because people start saying, "What? The first four what?" :lol:

Mozart
02-08-2012, 08:49 PM
On Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia where I now live cottages, etc are called bungaloos.
Dinner is lunch

znachki
02-08-2012, 10:00 PM
I remember taking a Dutch colleague to Boston and having him ask me what language the people in the train station were speaking. He refused to believe it was English. We were in business meetings, and he literally could not understand what people were saying.

I had that happen to me in Northern Ireland once. We were having dinner at a little place in Larne. I knew that the people at the next table were speaking English, but I couldn't understand more than a word here or there.

Also, in Scotland & Ireland, I was asked more than once if I was from Australia - and I'm from Seattle - home to those who have possibly the nearest to "dictionary" pronounciation in the US.

cruisin
02-08-2012, 10:30 PM
Yes, even the Wikipedia entry on bologna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bologna_sausage) allows that:

ETA: Apparently you can lay the blame for the "needs + past participle construction" on the language of the early Scots-Irish settlers of the region around Pittsburgh. At least you can if the wiki on "Pittsburgh English" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsburgh_English) is accurate.

Thanks for those! The second one especially. ALl of the pronunciation is spot on, I could hear my husband and his family. Can't tease them for the unusual pronunciation or grammar, they get :mad:! I can tease my husband though. My favorite is when he asks me to make him some aegs. Eggs, but pronounced with a long A instead of a short e. He gets ribbed for that from all of us!


On Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia where I now live cottages, etc are called bungaloos.
Dinner is lunch

Bungaloos or bungalos. We have small cottages here that are refered to as bungalos. Usually bungalos are the little cottages that are part of older resorts in the Poconos or the Catskills. but we have them around here too. This area used to be a vacation area - fresh air - for NYC dwellers, back in the '40s.

skatingfan5
02-08-2012, 10:55 PM
Thanks for those! The second one especially. ALl of the pronunciation is spot on, I could hear my husband and his family. Can't tease them for the unusual pronunciation or grammar, they get :mad:! I can tease my husband though. My favorite is when he asks me to make him some aegs. Eggs, but pronounced with a long A instead of a short e. He gets ribbed for that from all of us!I say "aigs" (or "aygs") when I'm talking about what hens lay -- however, when it is the verb "egg", I pronounce it with the short e. :shuffle:

Bungaloos or bungalos. We have small cottages here that are refered to as bungalos. Usually bungalos are the little cottages that are part of older resorts in the Poconos or the Catskills. but we have them around here too. This area used to be a vacation area - fresh air - for NYC dwellers, back in the '40s.I've always seen it as "bungalow" although I think that might be a derivation from "bungalo." Here in the midwest it's most often used to refer to a small one-story (or 1-1/2 story) house (http://architecture.about.com/od/periodsstyles/ig/House-Styles/Bungalow-Styles.htm) in a residential area -- not necessarily as part of a resort of any kind. I guess what is considered a bungalow varies a bit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bungalow), depending on the geographic region.

Prancer
02-08-2012, 11:00 PM
Also, in Scotland & Ireland, I was asked more than once if I was from Australia - and I'm from Seattle - home to those who have possibly the nearest to "dictionary" pronounciation in the US.

Really? I've never heard that before. I'm not even sure what dictionary pronunciation is :confused:.

skatingfan5
02-08-2012, 11:07 PM
Really? I've never heard that before. I'm not even sure what dictionary pronunciation is :confused:.Perhaps by "dictionary pronunciation" in the U.S. znachki means what is called "General American" or "Standard American English" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_American) accent? That is, a pronunciation that is distinguished from more regional accents (i.e. Southern, New England, etc.)? Think "generic network news broadcaster" accent.

Artemis@BC
02-08-2012, 11:10 PM
Bungaloos or bungalos. We have small cottages here that are refered to as bungalos. Usually bungalos are the little cottages that are part of older resorts in the Poconos or the Catskills. but we have them around here too.

My cousin in Manchester has a family cottage in Wales that they call "the bung." :lol:

Lucy25
02-08-2012, 11:10 PM
Born and raised in South Eastern Michigan and never heard of "bubbler". We drink from the water or drinking fountain. We also drink "pop", wear "tennis shoes", and play in the "basement". Also, it seems that everyone I have ever known goes "up north" to their "cabin" many times during the year. "Up north" is really anywhere more northern than where you (Michigander) live. Last summer I held a garage sale. A family came and told me they were up north for just a few weeks at their cabin. I live thirty miles north of Detroit, yet this was up north to this family who lived on the Ohio/Michigan border. Their "cabin" was a two story house a mile or so away from my house. Never considered my suburban neighborhood up north! "Cabins" can be any architectural style and can be huge or tiny.

Prancer
02-08-2012, 11:25 PM
Perhaps by "dictionary pronunciation" in the U.S. znachki means what is called "General American" or "Standard American English" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_American) accent? That is, a pronunciation that is distinguished from more regional accents (i.e. Southern, New England, etc.)? Think "generic network news broadcaster" accent.

Yes, but:

The General American accent is most closely related to a generalized Midwestern accent and is spoken particularly by many newscasters

Last time I checked, Seattle was not in the Midwest.

Of all the American accents, the Midwestern accent is the easiest on the ear, which is why newscasters and actors use it.

But pronunciation is a little different from accent.

cruisin
02-08-2012, 11:32 PM
My cousin in Manchester has a family cottage in Wales that they call "the bung." :lol:

Isn't that a slang word for anus? Yikes! :lol:

Funny, my husband and I were on vacation several years ago. We met this other couple who guessed my husband's from western PA, right off the bat. Then they asked me what part of the mid-west I was from. I said mid-north-western NJ. They didn't believe me. Even when I showed them my DL, they siad I might live here now, but I didn't grow up there. I actually had my birth certificate with me, so I proved it. :lol: The guy was flabbergasted, apparently he considers himself an accent expert. I guess not. :)

skatingfan5
02-09-2012, 12:18 AM
Yes, but:

The General American accent is most closely related to a generalized Midwestern accent and is spoken particularly by many newscasters

Last time I checked, Seattle was not in the Midwest.No, it isn't but from the same wiki entry:
Regional home of General American

It is commonly believed that General American English evolved as a result of an aggregation of rural and suburban Midwestern dialects, though the English of the Upper Midwest can deviate quite dramatically from what would be considered a "regular" American Accent. ...The fact that a Midwestern dialect became the basis of what is General American English is often attributed to the mass migration of Midwestern farmers to California and the Pacific Northwest from where it spread.Seattle is in the Pacific Northwest, at least it was the last time I was there. :shuffle:

And it seems that I grew up in "the area of the United States where the local accent is most similar to General American" (the Illinois part of the Quad Cities). People used to tell me that I should be a radio broadcaster because of my voice, but whenever I hear a recording of it, I think I don't sound "General American" enough -- a bit too flat, or something.

Of all the American accents, the Midwestern accent is the easiest on the ear, which is why newscasters and actors use it. But pronunciation is a little different from accent.I suppose it is, but given the context of znachki's post, I thought that accent was most likely what was being observed.