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Artemis@BC
02-07-2012, 11:27 PM
Here in the South we call them Wal-Mart tumbleweeds 'cause they're usually WM sacks. :)

Aside from the LOL of that ... there's another regionalism. I don't think anyone in Canada would ever refer to those as "sacks," only ever "bags."

RFOS
02-07-2012, 11:49 PM
Many people from NYC tick off people from other parts by referring to anything above the Bronx/Westchester as "upstate." My upstate cousins (Utica) make fun of us all the time when we use the phrase wrong. "Rye isn't Upstate NY, ninny!" By their measure, "Upstate NY" starts above the Catskills.


My personal definition of "Upstate" New York is in the top of the "head" (north of the "beak" if it were a duck's head :lol:), while Western New York is in the beak. Approximately what you'd get if you drew a line straight across and a line straight down from Oswego. "Downstate" New York is the triangle you'd get if you connected the straight northern border of Pennsylvania to the northern border of Connecticut. Then of course there's New York City and Long Island. The remaining chunk in the Eastern middle that includes Albany is what I'd call "Mid-State." :shuffle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswego,_New_York

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What do you call this kind of ice cream?
http://www.findandgoseek.net/uploads/7Ms8ToevEZ.jpg

In Vermont it's almost exclusively referred to as a "creemee" and I never even knew there was another term for it until I was a teenager when I learned that that was basically only a Vermont term. :shuffle: And the colored or chocolate rods that are sometimes put on them are sprinkles, not jimmies! :lol: (My cousins, who grew up in Southern New Hampshire, call them jimmies).

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How do you pronounce the internet abbreviation "LOL"/"lol" (and does it matter if it's capitalized)? I don't know that any variations in pronunciation of that would be regional, since it's not typically spoken. I mentally say it as rhyming with "roll"/"poll" (even if capitalized) while my sisters both say it, or at least used to, rhyming with "doll." I had never heard anyone pronounce it until I heard them pronounce it that way.

Reuven
02-07-2012, 11:58 PM
Comic strips were “the funnies” when I was growing up


Growing up on Long Island, anything north of Washington Heights is "Upstate". :lol:Don’t you mean “Long Gisland”? ;)

Up here any week-end retreat is called a “camp,” even if it’s a 5000 square foot mansion, and when one is heading there it’s “going upta camp.”

Aroostook county, the largest northernmost one is referred to simply as “The County."
Lobstah is boiled and served with drahwn buttah. Anything else is heresy. and yes, we eat “skollops."

Artemis@BC
02-08-2012, 12:21 AM
Up here any week-end retreat is called a “camp,” even if it’s a 5000 square foot mansion, and when one is heading there it’s “going upta camp.”

In BC, a summer/weekend/recreational home is a "cabin," regardless of architectural style. In Ontario and Quebec, it's a "cottage," again, regardless of architectural style. And I've seen some pretty honkin big cottages!

Bostonfan
02-08-2012, 12:32 AM
What do you call this kind of ice cream?
http://www.findandgoseek.net/uploads/7Ms8ToevEZ.jpg

In Vermont it's almost exclusively referred to as a "creemee" and I never even knew there was another term for it until I was a teenager when I learned that that was basically only a Vermont term.


I call it a "soft serve". I don't think that's a regional thing though.

FigureSpins
02-08-2012, 12:36 AM
We call it "soft serve," too.

But do you call these Sprinkles or Jimmies?

http://images.sodahead.com/polls/000817207/polls_ice_cream_with_sprinkles_5517_920890_poll_xl arge.jpeg

Jojo
02-08-2012, 01:05 AM
I lived in Australia for a few years, and some expressions have stayed with us. My son was born there, so for the longest time I was mummy, not mommy. We had a dummy for him, not a pacifier. He wore nappies, not diapers.

I had an unfortunate experience when I told a coworker that I was rooting for him :eek:. And the best expression I heard in Australia was 'spit the dummy', which is having a temper tantrum.

In Canada, pretty much everyone says pop.

I can think, too, of a few interesting regionalisms in Vancouver. Skookum is an Aboriginal word that means big or great. And going 'over town' is taking one of the bridges to go from North Vancouver to Vancouver.

Fergus
02-08-2012, 01:46 AM
Don’t you mean “Long Gisland”? ;)

Or "Lawn-GUY-land", whichever you prefer. :D

But make sure the "law" part is pronounced like "roar", not "awe".

vesperholly
02-08-2012, 04:01 AM
"Upstate" New Yorker here, though I definitely say WESTERN, as I'm only 20 minutes from Canada for crying out loud. :lol:

Here's an interesting map, though it's a bit off and more specific than I typically hear (Rochester is not part of the Finger Lakes, and I've never heard Thousand Islands Region): http://www.nyctourist.com/images/maps/map_newyork.jpg

Draw a line between Rochester and Syracuse, and that denotes Western NY. The counties bordering Pennsylvania are called the Southern Tier (this runs from Chautauqua all the way to Binghamton). Syracuse, Utica and Albany are Central NY. Everything north of the cities is Northern NY, or "the Adirondacks" only if you're specifically referring to that region, including Lake Placid. The terms are not interchangeable: Watertown is in Northern NY, but not the Adirondacks.

Albany is technically Eastern NY, but people don't use that term. I've only heard people live there call it the Capitol area (if you said "the Capitol" I'd assume you mean DC). South of the Central NY cities is "the Finger Lakes" — like the Adirondacks, the Finger Lakes are part of Central NY but it's not interchangeable. The Catskills and Hudson Valley are usually included in a general Downstate, and I find a lot of people will call NYC just "the city".

It doesn't piss me off if people say I live upstate — I do. If you are a literate New Yorker, you'll know the difference between the boroughs of NYC as well. :drama:

/obvious geography geek

Marge_Simpson
02-08-2012, 05:26 AM
Or "Lawn-GUY-land", whichever you prefer. :D

But make sure the "law" part is pronounced like "roar", not "awe".

but do you know what a Long Island big hair is? :lol:

Reuven
02-08-2012, 11:10 AM
Or "Lawn-GUY-land", whichever you prefer. :D

But make sure the "law" part is pronounced like "roar", not "awe".
Yeah, that's a much better phonetic. :lol: That's the way I always hear it.

emason
02-08-2012, 01:27 PM
We call it "soft serve," too.

But do you call these Sprinkles or Jimmies?

http://images.sodahead.com/polls/000817207/polls_ice_cream_with_sprinkles_5517_920890_poll_xl arge.jpeg


I call them shots, second choice jimmies, but never sprinkles. I first heard sprinkles when I moved to NY from Mass.

cruisin
02-08-2012, 01:48 PM
We call the ice cream soft serve. Carvel was the best! But try to find a Carvel store anymore.

I love the Long Island pronunciations. My 2 cents - Lawn guy lin. My college roomate was from Deah Pahk (Deer Park). I have a friend who drops the "R" off of most words - like moth-a (mother), New Yawk (New York). However he adds them where they dont exist. His sister-in-law is Linder (Linda). :lol:

People from NJ get accused of saying Joisey, we don't. That is a NY thing. We also get accused of just calling our state Joisey, we don't it's New Jersey. Those are considered NJ'isms, but they really are other places pronunciations.

Aceon6
02-08-2012, 01:54 PM
I call them shots, second choice jimmies, but never sprinkles. I first heard sprinkles when I moved to NY from Mass.

Same here. I remember the first Frosty truck that came around (Hartford, CT area, early/mid 60s) listed them as sprinkles, but no one in our neighborhood knew what sprinkles were, so the guy covered it over with "shots."

Fergus
02-08-2012, 03:38 PM
but do you know what a Long Island big hair is? :lol:

Mama Fergus' mah-jong buddies (http://impactinteractions.com/wp-content/uploads/Coffee-Talk_l1.jpg)?