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Marge_Simpson
02-07-2012, 08:18 AM
Ok, a correction: nobody who lives in NYC ever says anyone lives in Manhattan. They live in "the city".
I have no idea where Forham students claim they live. But that neighborhood is not Riverdale. Maybe they say they're in Belmont?

Bostonfan
02-07-2012, 12:29 PM
I've lived in Mass all my life and always pronounce them as s"call"ops. I rarely hear the other pronunciation, but never thought much of it.

NinjaTurtles
02-07-2012, 01:31 PM
Many people from NYC tick off people from other parts by referring to anything above the Bronx/Westchester as "upstate." My upstate cousins (Utica) make fun of us all the time when we use the phrase wrong. "Rye isn't Upstate NY, ninny!" By their measure, "Upstate NY" starts above the Catskills.


I grew-up in Central NY (30 minutes outside of Utica in rural nowhere). Upstate is really the Adirondacks or Seaway area. The Catskills are most certainly downstate, but everything is upstate to NYC :lol:

It's the same thing when people ask where you are from and you say NY, they always assume you mean the city! :P

cruisin
02-07-2012, 02:18 PM
Aren't we (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8Kp7WX7y8M) also supposed to be the only place that doesn't put mustard on hamburgers? :lol:

(Anyone else ketchup only?) ;)

I'm going to guess Pittsburgh. There is an almost religious dedication to ketchup there - Heinz and all. :lol:


Nobody lives in Manhattan, they live in "the city" :lol.

Yes, though I have a friend who lived her whole life in northern NJ and she says she's going into Manhattan. It makes me chuckle. I worked in the city for many years. When we would visit family/friends in other states and people would ask me where I work, I always answered - "the city". Guess I figured that everyone would just know which city - :lol:

The upstate, central, northern, NY thing is relative. Same for NJ and pretty much anywhere else. If you live in Utica, the Adirondacs are upstae/north. But, if you live in West Chester, Utica is upstate/north. We live in northern NJ and think of the Amboys as the dividing line between norht and south. People from AC think of Seaside as north Jersey.

Jenny
02-07-2012, 03:04 PM
In NYC, "come with?" means "do you want to come with me (somewhere)?"

Too funny. I never heard that in NY, but they say it all the time on Entourage, whose main characters are supposed to be from Queens ("I have a meeting with Ari, why don't you come with?") so now hubby and I say that all the time.


Regarding the pop/soda and people snottily correcting the usage, I get a real kick out of people who correct the pronunciation of the word scallops. The people who fish them call them s"call"ops, and in the majority of the english speaking world that is how it is pronounced. S"cal"ops is a less common regional variation, not the "correct" way to pronounce it.


I heard someone giving someone a hard time about it on the ferry from Saint John to Digby, a place known for its scallops. I think it's fun to learn the regionalisms, but like you said, if there was a "right" way to pronounce everything we'd all be speaking the Queen's English for heaven sake.


Hmmm. I would say "in line to buy." Third gen NYC. *shrugs*

I'm sure many New Yorkers say "in line" too, but I wouldn't notice that because it sounds normal to me. I do remember standing in many a Duane Reade and having the cashiers yell out "next on line!" I heard it everywhere.


Ok, a correction: nobody who lives in NYC ever says anyone lives in Manhattan. They live in "the city".

When I lived there, I would tell locals I lived on the Upper West Side and worked in Midtown. To anyone else, I lived and worked in New York.

If I had ever said "the city" people would have asked "which one?" :lol:

Fergus
02-07-2012, 03:36 PM
I grew-up in Central NY (30 minutes outside of Utica in rural nowhere). Upstate is really the Adirondacks or Seaway area. The Catskills are most certainly downstate, but everything is upstate to NYC :lol:

Growing up on Long Island, anything north of Washington Heights is "Upstate". :lol:

I've noticed that among NYC-dwellers, when asked where in the city do they live, Manhattan, Brooklyn, & Queens residents mention their neighborhood (i.e. Upper West Side, Williamsburg, Canarsie, etc.....), while folks from the Bronx and Staten Island say the Bronx and Staten Island. Dunno why.

Southpaw
02-07-2012, 05:07 PM
I think the mustard border is west of Clifton, NJ, south of Edison, NJ.

No way. The mustard border is much farther west than Clifton. I may even put it as far as the Delaware River. :COP:

Aceon6
02-07-2012, 05:21 PM
No way. The mustard border is much farther west than Clifton. I may even put it as far as the Delaware River. :COP:

CT native here. Ketchup only until the mid 60s when folks started getting used to Mickie D's standard preparation. Most folks I know still prefer ketchup only.

skatingfan5
02-07-2012, 05:41 PM
Very late to this thread (this time around :lol:), but here are the word choices I use/hear most often (I've lived in Illinois for several decades now, but was born and raised in New Jersey, just west of NYC):

There were dust kittens under the bed as a child, now they seem to have gone extinct or been driven out of their habitat by those aggressively reproducing dust bunnies!
Soda, not pop
Sofa or couch (Davenport was the town across the river)
When I was a child, we first lived on the top floor of a three-flat owned by my great-grandfather (although I don't think that's what it was called in NJ, but that's what I call it) and had a front room (which WAS in the front). Moving to suburbia, our new split-level house had a living room and there was a rec room on the lower level. At the very lowest level was the cellar (in the three-flat) or the basement (in the newer houses) -- they both had concrete floors.
In NJ sneakers were made of canvas back in the day, while tennis shoes were leather (and only worn for tennis). My mother once got in a heated argument with a shoe store clerk when she insisted she didn't want "tennis shoes" for my siblings and me.
My mom and grandmother carried pocketbooks or handbags; my mother now carries a purse as do I.
Paper bags, not sacks (which were made of burlap or some other fabric). "Brown bag" seminars at college (although my Illinois classmates brought "sack lunches" to grade school).
Dinner was eaten near mid-day on Sunday, the other six days we had supper as the evening meal. (Actually, on Sunday, we had both dinner and supper -- no lunch).
Nearly everything south of Chicago (or I-80) is downstate (not completely sure about the region north of I-80, but not in the Chicago area -- for all I know, it may also be "downstate"). :D
Sprinkles not jimmies.
The comic strips in the newspaper (especially on Sunday) were the funny pages or just the funnies -- even though Mary Worth or Rex Morgan were very rarely, if ever, funny. :shuffle:

cruisin
02-07-2012, 05:59 PM
^^ I'm farther west, NJ suburbs. always dust bunnies. Mom did carry a pocketbook, until she passed. Agree, sacks are made of burlap or some other fabric. Called comic strips, comic strips. Dad called them funny pages. I always call the evening meal dinner. Supper, for me is a late, light meal. But, Mom called the evening meal supper. Funny how the words we use can be different from our parent's. Even if we grow up/live in the same area.

Please excuse odd spelling. trying to type on my iPad. My computer is with the Mac geniuses. I've had kernel panics, they are doing diagnostics and fixing whatevere the glitch is. I feel like something is missing. The Mac genius told me this would give me a chance to bond with my iPad :LOL:

skatingfan5
02-07-2012, 06:24 PM
^^ I'm farther west, NJ suburbs. always dust bunnies.Hmm, according to Dictionary.com, it appears that dust bunnies may be a more recent evolutionary development:
dust bunny noun Slang . a loose, tangled ball of dust, lint, hair, etc., especially as found under a low piece of furniture. Origin: 196570 I guess I am giving away my advanced age. :lol:

Here's the whole family tree:
dust ball noun
Chiefly Northern and North Midland U.S. a ball or roll of dust and lint that accumulates indoors, as in corners or under furniture.
Also called dust curl.

Regional variation note
Dust ball and dust curl are used chiefly in the North and North Midland U.S. Dust kitten and dust kitty are also in use in the Northern U.S., but there are many other terms that are in use in widely scattered local areas, such as dust mouse, house moss, and woolly.Although I have heard dust ball (and even dust mouse), I have never in my life heard the term "dust curl." Perhaps that's an early developmental stage that my bad housekeeping (and cats) have quickly passed through. :slinkaway

Moto Guzzi
02-07-2012, 08:01 PM
One thing that fascinated me about The Wizard of Oz was the storm cellar with the slanted door sitting on the ground. I had never seen anything like that before, but later, I noticed that a few houses had them to get into the crawl spaces under the house. They didn't have interior staircases or ladders. Maybe that's the difference between a "cellar" and a "basement?" We have a Wizard of Oz cellar on our family farm in Kansas. It's a separate building and not connected to the house. The walls are made of stone and extend above ground about 12 inches. It has a slanted door, several steps, and a wooden roof with storage space. We never use it during a tornado watch because it's quite old and wouldn't be much protection, particularly not with a wooden roof.

My mother stored her canning in the cellar. I always hated going down there because of the spiders. Every summer when my mother would start canning, I had to go down in the cellar and bring up the empty jars. Even worse, I had to wash them because my hands were small enough to fit inside. There were always dead spiders, spider eggs, and webs inside the jars. I hate spiders with a passion. :wideeyes::yikes:

cruisin
02-07-2012, 09:00 PM
Sometimes (with a dog that sheds) my dust bunnies are so big, I call them tumbleweeds :lol:

Fergus
02-07-2012, 10:03 PM
Sometimes (with a dog that sheds) my dust bunnies are so big, I call them tumbleweeds :lol:

We call random plastic bags floating down the street "NYC tumbleweed". :lol:

Grannyfan
02-07-2012, 10:45 PM
We call random plastic bags floating down the street "NYC tumbleweed". :lol:

Here in the South we call them Wal-Mart tumbleweeds 'cause they're usually WM sacks. :)