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Prancer
02-06-2012, 10:49 PM
Unless you went to college in an area that also says pop. :lol:

I DID! But I was surrounded by furriners! :drama:

Reuven
02-06-2012, 11:21 PM
In Massachusetts I never heard the word sprinkles when I was growing up; it was always shots or jimmies, depending on whether you were in Western Mass or Eastern Mass. Jimmies are common here in Maine.


Also, the first time I heard 'wicked' used extensively, it was Down East in Maine - nowhere near Boston.But up here, we pronounce it ďwickeít"



Surprised no one has mentioned tonic. In NH, that's soda pop. If you ask for a soda in some parts of NH, you'll get a fizzy stomach settling medicine.Knew a girl from WInthrop MA who used ďtonicĒ for soda. Milk shakes were "frappes" to her.



NYC/LI we call them "heros". Once on vacation in Maine, we called the local village pizza place and I asked for a meatball hero, to which the guy on the phone responded: "You want a hero? Call Superman". :rofl:If itís got meatballs, or sausage with red sauce on it, itís called a ďgrinderĒ in these parts. If itís got cold cuts on a long stick of bread, itís a sub. But if itís got Italian ham, cheese slices, sliced green peppers, chopped onions, sliced tomatoes, Greek olives and drizzled with olive oil...itís an Italian...and itís to die for.
Few other things, as a native of CT, you should know the state is pronounced as ďConneíiíkitĒ and the small city just south of Hartford is pronounced as ďNew BriíanĒ with a glottal stop in place of the ďt"

Prancer
02-06-2012, 11:33 PM
If itís got meatballs, or sausage with red sauce on it, itís called a ďgrinderĒ in these parts. If itís got cold cuts on a long stick of bread, itís a sub. But if itís got Italian ham, cheese slices, sliced green peppers, chopped onions, sliced tomatoes, Greek olives and drizzled with olive oil...itís an Italian...and itís to die for.

Meatballs or sausage with red sauce used to be called a hoagie here; sometimes it still is, but "meatball sub" is more common now.

Anything else on a long stick of bread with assorted sandwich items is called a sub. You can get veggie subs or chicken salad subs, etc.

An Italian is an Italian, but it's still a type of sub.

How does anyone ever get what they order when they travel?:lol:

cruisin
02-06-2012, 11:34 PM
Every now and then, we would all have an argument about gym shoes/tennis shoes/sneakers in college, but that one wasn't nearly as bad. There is something about pop that seems to drive the soda people kind of insane.

I know about sneakers/tennis shoes. I think tennis shoes are a specific style of sneaker. As are running shoes, basketball shoes. Here the entire category is sneakers, but my husband calls all athletic shoes tennis shoes.

Another thing that makes me crazy is, calling spaghetti sauce, spaghetti gravy. I know it's an Italian regional thing, but my family is from the area that should call it gravy, we don't. For me gravy is made from meat renderings. You add flour or cornstarch to thicken it and put it on the meat. Sauce is something made entirely on it's own, to go on anything you choose.

FigureSpins
02-07-2012, 01:15 AM
In NYC, "come with?" means "do you want to come with me (somewhere)?"

Sandwiches on long rolls or italian bread are "heroes."

Kaiser Rolls are round rolls that are fluffy inside, crusty outside, with a "crown" pattern creased on top, usually with poppy seeds outside.
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/up/20060704kaiserfront.jpg

Our Old House(s) (pre-1930's) had a "basement" with a finished floor and a "cold cellar" which was a small room off the basement.

One thing that fascinated me about The Wizard of Oz was the storm cellar with the slanted door sitting on the ground. I had never seen anything like that before, but later, I noticed that a few houses had them to get into the crawl spaces under the house. They didn't have interior staircases or ladders. Maybe that's the difference between a "cellar" and a "basement?"

Prancer
02-07-2012, 02:37 AM
One thing that fascinated me about The Wizard of Oz was the storm cellar with the slanted door sitting on the ground. I had never seen anything like that before, but later, I noticed that a few houses had them to get into the crawl spaces under the house. They didn't have interior staircases or ladders. Maybe that's the difference between a "cellar" and a "basement?"

We had slanted outside doors like that when I lived on a farm, but we also had access inside the house. The slanted doors we had led to the old coal bin and the old root vegetable bin, and were designed to allow for easy deliveries.

It had a dirt floor and no electricity, and it was definitely a cellar :P.

When we had tornadoes, we sheltered in the closet under the stairs because no one wanted to go down in the cellar.

rjblue
02-07-2012, 03:12 AM
Regarding the pop/soda and people snottily correcting the usage, I get a real kick out of people who correct the pronunciation of the word scallops. The people who fish them call them s"call"ops, and in the majority of the english speaking world that is how it is pronounced. S"cal"ops is a less common regional variation, not the "correct" way to pronounce it.

It gets almost comical on cooking shows, when the two hosts have dueling pronunciations. I've seen both hosts overenunciate the word, as if saying it more clearly will make them win the word war.

And I said earlier that we call our lunch pails- lunch buckets. But we more commonly call them dinner buckets, and hence our meals in this area are breakfast, dinner, and supper. The size of the meal doesn't really matter. You can have a sandwich for dinner or a three course meal. It's simply the time of day.

I'm not sure about the rest of Canada, but here the distance between places is almost always told by time. Moncton is an hour and half from Fredericton, which is 40 min from my house, and I'm 2 hours from Grand Falls, etc.

Fergus
02-07-2012, 03:18 AM
The one that always gives away a New Yorker is that they say "on line" instead of "in line," as in, "I was waiting on line to buy a movie ticket." Never heard anyone else use that phrase that way.

Aren't we (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8Kp7WX7y8M) also supposed to be the only place that doesn't put mustard on hamburgers? :lol:

(Anyone else ketchup only?) ;)

vesperholly
02-07-2012, 03:31 AM
Regarding the pop/soda and people snottily correcting the usage, I get a real kick out of people who correct the pronunciation of the word scallops. The people who fish them call them s"call"ops, and in the majority of the english speaking world that is how it is pronounced. S"cal"ops is a less common regional variation, not the "correct" way to pronounce it.

It gets almost comical on cooking shows, when the two hosts have dueling pronunciations. I've seen both hosts overenunciate the word, as if saying it more clearly will make them win the word war.

Wow, I never even knew there was another way to pronounce scallops. To me, it's "cal" like "calorie". There are people who say "scollops"?

rjblue
02-07-2012, 04:02 AM
Skol-op (http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/dictionaries/english/data/d0082751.html) is the way the people who fish them pronounce it (Maritimes canada) and the way it is pronounced in the english speaking world who aren't USA or Ontario. I guess it is like Zee instead of Zed for the last letter of the alphabet. And if someone in a restaurant offered me S"cal"ops, I'd assume they are too far inland to know how to cook them properly. :D

FigureSpins
02-07-2012, 05:14 AM
The one that always gives away a New Yorker is that they say "on line" instead of "in line," as in, "I was waiting on line to buy a movie ticket." Never heard anyone else use that phrase that way.
Hmmm. I would say "in line to buy." Third gen NYC. *shrugs*


Aren't we also supposed to be the only place that doesn't put mustard on hamburgers?
I think the mustard border is west of Clifton, NJ, south of Edison, NJ. Not sure about the north, but Long Island is to the east and I've never had to say "hold the mustard." (Another colloquialism, not sure if it's NYC-based, though. Sounds like diner-speak.)

Many people from NYC tick off people from other parts by referring to anything above the Bronx/Westchester as "upstate." My upstate cousins (Utica) make fun of us all the time when we use the phrase wrong. "Rye isn't Upstate NY, ninny!" By their measure, "Upstate NY" starts above the Catskills.


There are five boroughs that make up NYC. Residents of each borough have subtly different ways of saying where they live:

I live in Brooklyn - residents usually state their area instead: Canarsie, Bay Ridge, etc.
I live (over) in Queens - few people admit to being from Flushing, they usually say they're from Corona.
I live in The Bronx - the area was incorporated as "THE Bronx," and most people refer to it that way, or "up in (da) Bronx"
I live ON Staten Island - well, it is an island, after all, with the bridge tolls for proof.
I live in Manhattan - only non-NYC people say "in/on Manhattan Island"

Marge_Simpson
02-07-2012, 06:11 AM
I

There are five boroughs that make up NYC. Residents of each borough have subtly different ways of saying where they live:

I live in Brooklyn - residents usually state their area instead: Canarsie, Bay Ridge, etc.
I live (over) in Queens - few people admit to being from Flushing, they usually say they're from Corona.
I live in The Bronx - the area was incorporated as "THE Bronx," and most people refer to it that way, or "up in (da) Bronx"
I live ON Staten Island - well, it is an island, after all, with the bridge tolls for proof.
I live in Manhattan - only non-NYC people say "in/on Manhattan Island"

Nobody lives in Manhattan, they live in "the city" :lol:
When I lived in Queens in the late 80's, it was Jamaica that nobody admitted to being from. :eek:
And people from Riverdale never say they live in The Bronx.

Nomad
02-07-2012, 06:26 AM
According to a friend of mine, Rhode Islanders call (or used to call) a chocolate shake a "cabinet".

lurvylurker
02-07-2012, 06:28 AM
When it comes to beer localisms, I would think that Canadians rule :lol:

Here a pack of 24 beers is called a "two-four" or simply a "case."


And a six-pack of beer is called a "poverty pack". :)

FigureSpins
02-07-2012, 06:49 AM
Nobody lives in Manhattan, they live in "the city" :lol:
True enough, but that depends on where you are at the time. If you're in Kansas, "New York" will probably be the first reply, following by "the city."

In town, pressed with a "yeah, but where?" you'll probably get a "upper west side" or "soho" etc answer from Manhattanites.

Technically, anyone in the five boroughs is a resident of "the city." DH's transplanted Brooklyn cousins say "the city" to anyone who asks where in NY they came from.


When I lived in Queens in the late 80's, it was Jamaica that nobody admitted to being from. :eek:
Jamaica, huh?



And people from Riverdale never say they live in The Bronx.
Interesting - I didn't know that. What about Fordham students that live on campus?