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agalisgv
12-22-2011, 02:05 AM
Yeah, Franco did a video interview last year where he said he got a D in this class. It's been posted on the internet. Not sure how that would get the professor in trouble. The info was only released as part of a court filing, and that's within the scope of FERPA.

FWIW, there's more to the lawsuit than just this. There's supposedly a string of behaviors that are being contested. The professor in question wasn't just an instructor, but didn't have a regular contract either (visiting professor). He was also head of the department prior to this IIUC.

Prancer
12-22-2011, 02:08 AM
If it's true that it's the student that revealed the grade to the public first, can the professor get in trouble for saying what grade the student got? From what I've read, Franco told Showbiz411.com last year what grade he got in this class.

My understanding has always been that students are free to discuss their grades at will, but I can't talk about their grades with anyone not specified as an exception without express permission. We had a case several years ago where a student complained to a reporter about a certain grade; the professor who gave the grade was advised to say nothing publicly, regardless of the fact that the student had already revealed the grade.

My understanding is that I am allowed to talk about attendance, so I could say that Franco had missed 12 out of 14 classes, but that's about it.

agalisgv
12-22-2011, 02:10 AM
My understanding has always been that students are free to discuss their grades at will, but I can't talk about their grades with anyone not specified as an exception without express permission. We had a case several years ago where a student complained to a reporter about a certain grade; the professor who gave the grade was advised to say nothing publicly, regardless of the fact that the student had already revealed the grade.

My understanding is that I am allowed to talk about attendance, so I could say that Franco had missed 12 out of 14 classes, but that's about it. I think the issue here is the info was contained in a court filing, and that filing is public record. That's within the scope of FERPA to be released without the consent of the student.


ETA: One other thing--one of the main profs Santana cites in his complaint is the brother of Elizabeth Edwards.

skatesindreams
12-22-2011, 10:17 PM
A professor shouldn't discuss any student's grade without permission.

maatTheViking
12-22-2011, 10:55 PM
I think it depends on the subject. If the class is one that goes by the book, that's one thing. But if the class is one that requires a lot of hands-on work, student interaction or group work, that's another.

I'd think Directing would be a hands-on class, but I don't know.



That is true, but I would expect the school to have clear policies? Eg. this is a hands on class and a certain lack of attendence will takie your grade down. In whivh case there would be clearly documented reasons why the grade was given... I have a feeling this about something else too...

Vagabond
12-22-2011, 11:30 PM
I think the issue here is the info was contained in a court filing, and that filing is public record. That's within the scope of FERPA to be released without the consent of the student.

Statements in the complaint about a student's grades are probably protected by the litigation privilege. I suspect that if Franco really cared about his privacy, he could seek an order that the complaint be "sealed" so that it wouldn't be available to the general public. However, since Franco has apparently acknowledged in the media that he got a "D," I doubt that he would file a motion for such an order, let alone that the court would issue one.

agalisgv
12-23-2011, 12:13 AM
^^^That's my thinking as well