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View Full Version : Mao Asada Withdrew from GPF - UPDATE - Mao's Mother has passed away :(



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Vash01
12-10-2011, 07:39 PM
I'm not sure he is being an ass so much this time. Look at it this way, Mao and her family chose --in spite of enormous media attention on her all the time--to never publicly talk about her mother's clearly long term illness. That would indicate that it is something they wished to deal with privately. Given that, a very public expression of sympathy may not be comfortable for them. It may be much better for Mao if the skaters she knows well are allowed to express their sympathy to her in more private ways, and as much as some of them see/compete against each other, I'm sure that they will and federation officials will assist in that.

That's an interesting perspective. I think both options are OK; there is an explanation/justification for each. I feel that many skaters would privately send their condolences to Mao and her family, regardless of any formal announcement. As for the audience, I still feel it would be nice if they knew why Mao is not at the GPF, but now they will have to find out through others in attendance.

I wish there was a website where we could post messages of condolences for Mao and her family.

allezfred
12-10-2011, 07:46 PM
As far as I can remember there wasn't a moment of silence for Joannie Rochette's mother at the Olympics was there?

While I understand people wishing to express their condolences and sympathy to the Asada family and the well meaning spirit behind it, I don't think having a minute's silence is appropriate in this instance. Kyoko Asada was a private person and didn't appear in the media. Minute silences are generally for individuals who are well known to the public or for national/international tragedies.

Rex
12-10-2011, 08:09 PM
Very sad. Poor Mao and Mai.

Hiro32
12-10-2011, 08:55 PM
Mao's father commented
Mai and Mao look at their mother's face showing RIP, and they understand her long battle against the illness ended. They stay strong for now.

allezfred
12-10-2011, 08:58 PM
In some ways when a relative who is suffering from a terminal illness passes away, it can be a great relief to the family to know that they are no longer in pain. It certainly was that way for me when my father died of cancer.

Kasey
12-10-2011, 09:03 PM
While I understand people wishing to express their condolences and sympathy to the Asada family and the well meaning spirit behind it, I don't think having a minute's silence is appropriate in this instance. Kyoko Asada was a private person and didn't appear in the media. Minute silences are generally for individuals who are well known to the public or for national/international tragedies.

Ditto. For a private person, I think to continue to respect the privacy of the deceased and their family is the most viable and kind thing to do right now. Those skaters, such as apparently Takahashi, who knew Mrs. Asada and were somewhat close with her and the family perhaps can do something of their own privately to show support.

Sasha'sSpins
12-10-2011, 09:05 PM
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/sports/news/20111209p2g00m0sp236000c.html

try it this time

Thanks for the link.

From the article:
Cinquanta, however, said that there were no plans to observe a minute of silence to mark Kyoko Asada's passing at the GP Final.

"I would like to say we have to conduct anyway this final to which Mao qualified as one of the best skaters in the world," said the 73-year-old Italian.

"As the International Skating Union we have sent already an official message of condolence to the (Japanese skating) federation, to the sports entities in Japan and in particular to the family."

"But we consider that this is a very private position and therefore to take another initiative such as a moment of silence is something beyond the personal and family situation."

It's probably what the family preferred. Mrs. Asada rest her soul was not a public figure after all. I had no she had been so sick.

DORISPULASKI
12-10-2011, 09:32 PM
That sounds appropriate by Cinquanta. To me anyway.

jenny12
12-10-2011, 10:03 PM
That sounds appropriate by Cinquanta. To me anyway.

Me too. Mrs. Asada seemed like the type of woman who stayed in the background and didn't draw attention to herself. I think Cinquanta did the right thing here.

liv
12-10-2011, 10:05 PM
So sorry for Mao and the family. Hope she can mourn in peace and privacy and then gain strength with time to continue on, as only she knows, how her mother would wish.

It seems to me that we hear too often about skaters losing their mothers too early. For the most part, elite female figure skaters are not a huge group, and yet quite a few have lost their moms...Mao, Joannie, Angela etc.. It's just...odd.

Lavergne100
12-10-2011, 11:19 PM
My heart goes out to Mao...I lost my mom in 2004 and was in a fog for 6 months after. Every holiday, every little thing you see around the house that your mom gave you: Bittersweet. I can't imagine being in the public eye while enduring such a private pain.

Bonita
12-11-2011, 12:05 AM
I lost my mom several years ago and the pain never goes away. Like Lavergne100 said, reminders are everywhere, and it's just so painful. Holidays are the worst. I hope Mao has tons of friends and family there for her. So painful that she didn't get to say goodbye....

attyfan
12-11-2011, 12:35 AM
I lost my mom 2 years ago ... while she was touring Japan (so I didn't get to say goodbye). There are, however, other factors (in my mom's case, it was quick, unexpected, and painless; with Mao's mom, with a long standing illness, there would be different ones). Furthermore, I found much comfort from family and friends ... and I hope that Mao will find that, also.

JAF
12-11-2011, 01:26 AM
Had to go find this. Hopes this helps a little.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1rMvNAj0RY

AragornElessar
12-11-2011, 02:58 AM
I am so sad to hear this tragic news and my condolences go out to Mao and the entire Asada Family. As many have said, so many of the decisions Mao has made in the last couple of years, her far too thin appearance...So much now makes sense.

Liver disease/cancer is still, even in this day and age of advanced Medical treatments, one of the few ailments not much can be done about once it's discovered. It truly is a very cruel disease.

May Mrs. Asada now be at peace. :(