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IceAlisa
12-08-2011, 04:48 AM
The comment about China is ridiculous. It would have been so much easier for his parents in China? Really, Patrick? You'd think they'd immigrated for a reason.

Proustable
12-08-2011, 04:50 AM
With that comment, I read Chan as saying: "Due to the way China's sports system works, financial hardship is not shifted to the parents. The sacrifices my parents made, such as my mother having to move with me to Florida and subsequently Colorado, would not be required there."

Sylvia
12-08-2011, 04:54 AM
I interpreted Chan's comment that his "parents wouldn't have had to make as much sacrifices as they have" to mean that they would have sacrificed less financially because China's elite sports programs fund their athletes (all expenses paid for the most part?). But I'm not sure if Chan is fully aware of the "down side" of being a part of the Chinese sports machine...

WildRose
12-08-2011, 04:55 AM
It's too bad Patrick has never performed in any of the Canadian shows or tours as Canada's other top eligible skaters have always done. He might be pleasantly surprised at the response he'd receive if he did.

flowerpower
12-08-2011, 04:57 AM
I wasn't actually thinking of Johnny. But I get what you mean, aftershocks.

I do agree that he puts his foot in his mouth. And frankly, as a Canadian, I'd say that if he doesn't like something about our country, he's welcome to move elsewhere and skate for whichever country he wishes (if he really thinks that would be better :P).

I was just commenting on the fact that N.A. skaters are criticized for being politically correct, yet also criticized when they're not politically correct. Skaters from some other countries are applauded for being blunt.

aftershocks
12-08-2011, 05:00 AM
Ah, Proustable, but again I think Chan needs to be clearer what he means. It seems pretty much that he says a lot of things without thinking. Lots of things would not have been required in China for his parents to "sacrifice," but you can be sure a whole lot of other things would have been required for him and his parents to "sacrifice." Chan needs to read, The Second Mark (section on Shen and Zhao), and Lucinda Ruh's Frozen Teardrop. He also needs to speak with Chen Lu and other retired former Chinese figure skaters about the "sacrifices" required of them and their parents by the Chinese federation, not to mention the Chinese government.

IceAlisa
12-08-2011, 05:02 AM
^^^This. He cannot be wholly unaware of the life and sacrifices of Chinese elite athletes.

agalisgv
12-08-2011, 05:03 AM
I think Chan needs to be clearer what he means. What was unclear?

taf2002
12-08-2011, 05:06 AM
I was just commenting on the fact that N.A. skaters are criticized for being politically correct, yet also criticized when they're not politically correct. Skaters from some other countries are applauded for being blunt.

No, it's only successful NA skaters who are criticized that way. If any skater wins a lot, every word is scrutenized. And when that skater is also a NA, it's worse, they can do no right.

Yukari Lepisto
12-08-2011, 05:07 AM
lol, patrick should know that those chinese athletes don't even get the chance to study or go to school. People would jump out and say oh they do study. but it's very different from the normal school system. It's more like they're taught how to do the basic reading. The athletes have no life but train.

A lot of people think China's all great now, but that's only from the outside. There's a reason why more and more people are still emigrating out of China. Patrick needs to really know more to make these assertive comments.

Also, Patrick might feel that Chinese people treat him really well from the shows or competitions he's done there. But he forgot people are treating him like that because he's FROM Canada.

Sylvia
12-08-2011, 05:07 AM
From the Globe and Mail response article:

A Skate Canada official said the interview was conducted earlier this fall, shortly after Chan had returned form China. The remarks were “a stream of consciousness” about his feelings about his Chinese heritage and not meant to reflect on his Canadian ties, said the official, who was not authorized to be quoted in the media.

Chan was en route to Canada Wednesday evening to compete in the 2011 ISU Grand Prix of figure skating final at ExpoCité in Quebec City and was unavailable for comment.
To be continued...

bek
12-08-2011, 05:10 AM
^^^This. He cannot be wholly unaware of the life and sacrifices of Chinese elite athletes.

I think there are absolutely benefits to a sports system and drawbacks. But I read about the Chinese fed making Shen/Zhao a married couple live in dorms apart from each other yes, and think its just ridiculous. Even the Soviets didn't go that far. Although of course my understanding of the situation could be wrong.

This being said in general, Patrick wouldn't be Patrick without the Canadian system. Its not like the Chinese system has tons of great coaches to provide Patrick. While they are starting to do well with some talented juniors, they are really just trying to build their system.. He was taught after all as a child by a legendary Canadian coach.

aftershocks
12-08-2011, 05:11 AM
What was unclear?


Ha ha, agalisgv! In this case, I'm referring to Chan's unthinking comments about his parents likely not having to "sacrifice" in China what they "sacrificed" for his skating in Canada. Actually, once again, it seems Chan is a bit confused in his thinking, but that often happens to young adults who are still maturing and gaining a broader perspective.

What's more "confusing and unclear" to me (need I say ;)) are the scores Chan often receives.

ETA:
Thanks for the additional news item Sylvia, indicating when the "stream of consciousness" :P remarks were made (great spin way of putting it). Wonder why it is only now coming out -- the press cycle for the publication?

ITA bek, and Yukari Lepisto.

Yukari Lepisto
12-08-2011, 05:14 AM
This being said in general, Patrick wouldn't be Patrick without the Canadian system. Its not like the Chinese system has tons of great coaches to provide Patrick. While they are starting to do well with some talented juniors, they are really just trying to build their system.. He was taught after all as a child by a legendary Canadian coach.

Exactly. He got to where he is now because he's born in Canada. His parents are from Canton, China, which is the southern china. There is exactly ZERO chinese figure skaters in the national team that's from the southern part of China until today. If he's born in China, his parents would not even think about having him learn figure skating, because it's just not even part of the option until recent years. there's simply no ice there. that's why s/z wanted to open up a rink in the southern part of china.

agalisgv
12-08-2011, 05:18 AM
Ha ha, agalisgv! In this case, I'm referring to Chan's unthinking comments about his parents not having to "sacrifice" in China what they "sacrificed" for his skating in Canada. Actually, once again, it seems Chan is a bit confused in his thinking, but that often happens to young adults who are still maturing and gaining a broader perspective. I tend to agree with Sylvia's take that he was thinking of basically getting a free ride financially if he were to skate in China.

But overall I think his comments were pretty clear--he doesn't feel he's getting enough recognition in Canada, and he thinks if he were competing in China, he would be getting that. Also, I don't think that Chan was being immature. I think he has (and has had for quite some time) a very strong ego. And I think his comments have consistently reflected that over the years. It's not the worst thing in the world, but it is what it is.