PDA

View Full Version : Chan trapped between two worlds



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 [14] 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Judy
12-09-2011, 12:24 AM
Kurt Browning also did tons of non-tour activities (like TV commentating) that made him better known in Canada. But a lot of this was after he retired from competitive skating. Chan is still competing.

Browning always did the Canadian tour of SOI.

Was Patrick even old enough to know what was going on? It was a great era of popularity in Canada for skating. It was before the scandals and the Olympic scandal which did a lot of damage to figure skating. Personally it turned me off for quite a few years. The rilvalry between Browning and Stojko was awesome .. and of course the Nancy Kerrigan attack made figure skating even more popular.

Not to mention that Browning was a 4 time world champion and Stojko of course had his world and Olympic medals. They earned their fame. Patrick has to shut up and just let his skating speak for itself. I'm sure Skate Canada is scrambling now with damage control.

Sugar
12-09-2011, 12:26 AM
Stick to skating, Stojko tells Chan, and love will follow
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/more-sports/stick-to-skating-stojko-tells-chan-and-love-will-follow/article2265134/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Sports&utm_content=2265134
“It takes time to build a persona and a connection,” said Stojko, who was also a two-time Olympic silver medalist and a seven-time Canadian champ. “Winning once doesn’t do it. The problem with [what Chan said] is that he can’t blame the fans, he can’t blame the people. Just because you’re not being embraced the way you expected, to me it means you’re not really doing it for the right reasons. I think he needs to be really careful in what he says. It looks like all he wants is recognition and appreciation.

“If you do it for the love of the sport, then the support will come.”

IceAlisa
12-09-2011, 12:32 AM
Why is Stojko inserting himself into this? Does he have to pipe up every time there is a controversy? I still haven't forgotten his comments about "masculinity". :rolleyes:

Is he just struggling to stay relevant?

doubleflutz
12-09-2011, 12:33 AM
Well said, kwanette! I was thinking many of those same thought. BTW, why isn't he in Canadian SOI? That would be a way for him to earn some money so that he could pay for taxi rides...

Isn't he usually skating in Asia most of the off-season? That likely pays much, much better than even the Canadian SOI, so from a purely financial point, it makes perfect sense. He's not the only skater to have talked about how great (and huge) Asian skating audiences are. It's where the money is these days. Plus, you know, he's entitled to actually use his off-season to have an off-season and go on vacations.

allezfred
12-09-2011, 12:35 AM
From a three-month-old interview with Reuters that was reported Wednesday, Chan was quoted on how involved the Chinese government is in supporting its athletes, how things would “have been very different” had he skated for China and that he has better recognition in South Korea than he has in Canada, the country of his birth. Chan also said he was “slowly feeling more Chinese,” his family’s heritage.

I still don't see anything wrong with any of the above statements. Are some Canadians really that insecure that the assertion that things may be better/different elsewhere amounts to someone being unCanadian?

Good to see Stojko is still a knob though. :D


“The system doesn’t allow skating to be as epic as it used to be, as Patrick said,” said Stojko, who was critical of the judging at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics figure skating events. “People understood the 6.0 system. That was perfection. Now it’s just math. It has no meaning. With Patrick getting two world records, which was phenomenal, people are saying it’s just a number.

numbers123
12-09-2011, 12:38 AM
Chan may not explain or express himself well or it might be that the media is looking for off the cuff remarks that might sound egotistical or whatever, but I fail to see how he is scored or falls relates to the actual comments made here.

In some respects I agree with Chan - skating is an expensive sport. China does have a system that supports its athletes to be able to train without a huge financial commitment. If he skated in China, he would have some advantages that he does not have in North America. Whether we as a figure skating board recognize it or not, hockey is bigger than figure skating in Canada. I believe that he was trying to give a reference for the recognition aspect, not say that Canada does not recognize him, just that hockey stars are more recognizable. And since YuNa is from Korea and was a world champion at the same time of Chan's success, it does not surprise me that he is recognized in Korea. Also the major interaction he would have with fans in Korea will be figure skating fans not necessarily the general population which gives him a different view of the country.

If I read the article correctly he is the first generation Canadian of Chinese immigrants? In general, first generation of immigrants try to distance themselves from their parents' country or origin during their high school years and it is not until one matures that one begins to appreciate their heritage - in Patrick's case China. I think because of his extensive travels and interaction with other cultures, Patrick is much more aware of his background than perhaps other first generation adult children of immigrants.

Do I think that Patrick needs a muzzle or a pause button to think before he speaks, yeah probably. But then who of us doesn't need one at some time(s) in our lives?

Again, I fail to see why the overscoring or falls within programs are relevant to this conversation. Maybe I am blind or something.

I am not Chan's greatest fan and do think that there are some judging issues, but that does not relate to this discussion about being caught between two worlds/remarks in an interview

walei
12-09-2011, 12:42 AM
Is that really correct? I recall seeing competitions where he was outskated by a few skaters but won anyway. It's not like there is no talent in the mens field. The judging that's doing it (making it boring for him for compete).

Example please, and it'd be great if you can be specific including what score Chan and those that "out skated" him should get.

overedge
12-09-2011, 12:43 AM
The system doesn’t allow skating to be as epic as it used to be, as Patrick said,” said Stojko, who was critical of the judging at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics figure skating events. “People understood the 6.0 system. That was perfection. Now it’s just math. It has no meaning. With Patrick getting two world records, which was phenomenal, people are saying it’s just a number.

So "6" and "0" are not numbers, then?

IceAlisa
12-09-2011, 12:47 AM
In general, first generation of immigrants try to distance themselves from their parents' country or origin during their high school years and it is not until one matures that one begins to appreciate their heritage - in Patrick's case China. I think because of his extensive travels and interaction with other cultures, Patrick is much more aware of his background than perhaps other first generation adult children of immigrants.


I don't find this to be the case in a state where Asians are a majority. Perhaps where you live things are different. For instance, there is a large Chinese-American community where I live. My perspective may be biased but most Chinese-Americans I know are justifiably proud of their heritage, observe Chinese Calendar holidays and traditions (Chinese New Year :swoon:) and go to China regularly. I am usually around people who are very well informed and aware of China and its culture.

WildRose
12-09-2011, 12:50 AM
[QUOTE=doubleflutz;3395752]Isn't he usually skating in Asia most of the off-season? That likely pays much, much better than even the Canadian SOI, so from a purely financial point, it makes perfect sense. He's not the only skater to have talked about how great (and huge) Asian skating audiences are. It's where the money is these days. Plus, you know, he's entitled to actually use his off-season to have an off-season and go on vacations.[/

CSOI isn't a lengthy tour - other Canadian skaters do both - CSOI and shows in Asia.

numbers123
12-09-2011, 01:04 AM
I don't find this to be the case in a state where Asians are a majority. Perhaps where you live things are different. For instance, there is a large Chinese-American community where I live. My perspective may be biased but most Chinese-Americans I know are justifiably proud of their heritage, observe Chinese Calendar holidays and traditions (Chinese New Year :swoon:) and go to China regularly. I am usually around people who are very well informed and aware of China and its culture.

I did say in general and not Asians/Chinese specific cultures.

walei
12-09-2011, 01:17 AM
I wonder those in this thread who are vocally against Chan's recent interview think about Chan's marks? I doubt most of them are even Canadian.

For what this is worth, I am a first generation Chinese-Canadian. I can totally understand Chan's mentality (given what we are presented with in the various articles) because when I was at Chan's age I went through the same thing. At that age I was trying very hard to find my identity and thought maybe it's easier for me to associate myself with my Asian roots for whatever reasons (in Chan's case I still think it's financial). But after so many years I realized that at the time I was really just seeking for an identity and patch it onto myself, not which side I actually identify myself with more. It was a very confusing time for myself and I wonder if Chan is going through the same thing.

Now that I'm ten years older I strongly identify myself as both of Chinese ethnicity and my Canadian upbringing and I love both dearly. But I wonder what kind of crap I would spew up ten years ago if I was a public figured being interviewed.

Again, camp Chan should really give Patrick some media training because they can be vicious in trying to get hits.

os168
12-09-2011, 01:17 AM
Stick to skating, Stojko tells Chan, and love will follow
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/more-sports/stick-to-skating-stojko-tells-chan-and-love-will-follow/article2265134/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Sports&utm_content=2265134
“It takes time to build a persona and a connection,” said Stojko, who was also a two-time Olympic silver medalist and a seven-time Canadian champ. “Winning once doesn’t do it. The problem with [what Chan said] is that he can’t blame the fans, he can’t blame the people. Just because you’re not being embraced the way you expected, to me it means you’re not really doing it for the right reasons. I think he needs to be really careful in what he says. It looks like all he wants is recognition and appreciation.

“If you do it for the love of the sport, then the support will come.”

Oh Eric, it is easier said than done!

When Patrick worked hard and reached to the top and found his parents are still broke, deep in debt try to sustain his 'career', he must felt terribly depressed and rather powerless, so he tried to please and appeal to those who sponsor him with their own money.

What did he get? Media agenda and slant played out like this. Timing is everything. Although the overwhelming negative reaction here says alot more about Patrick haters than what he actually said and meant. That he doesn't have the support, he need the support, and have to fight for it. Sad state for this sport really when you think about it.

He could have word it better though, big kid, learning the hard way! BUT LEARN FASTER PLEASE!!!!

Garden Kitty
12-09-2011, 01:39 AM
I thought this column from a cyclist about the "ups and downs of having an opinion" (http://www.cyclingnews.com/blogs/michael-creed/the-ups-and-downs-of-having-an-opinion) was interesting. He's writing about people's reactions when an athlete writes anything controversial in a blog or on twitter:


Pandering and placating are a must. Being self-effacing and self-deprecating is considered professional and humble. And confidence is being a snob.


If you are willing to accept praise for your ideas, you must be willing to accept criticism for them too and I agree.

I have a very thin skin. I think almost everyone does, especially pro cyclists even if they won't admit to it. Eventually most get tired of talking about themselves and opening up to criticism and stop using the Twitter account or blog for anything other than team PR or sponsor spam.

sliver98
12-09-2011, 01:54 AM
stojko, Chan and Plushenko should get together and create their own skating federation:lol: