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rjblue
12-04-2011, 11:54 PM
Here's a tip for you, if your husband likes potatoes. Hot, baked (dry) potatoes do have a high glycemic load. The wetter, boiling kinds (usually reds) have a MUCH lower glycemic index, and if you let them cool, the starch actually changes form to a resistant starch, which is a form of soluble fibre, which is very very good for you, and the potato has a much lower glycemic index. We are doing a lot of research on Potato starch qualities at my workplace and it is really interesting.

It's also true for other starchy foods like rice, that some of the starch becomes resistant starch when cooled.

judiz
12-05-2011, 12:06 AM
What should I be looking for, foods that are low in carbs or low in sugar? All the whole wheat pastas I saw had the same number of carbs as regular pasta.

rjblue
12-05-2011, 12:20 AM
Whole wheat or refined, they both have the same amount of sugars and starches. Carbs and sugar are both what you are trying to limit. They both increase the glycemic index of food (actually, sugar is a kind of carb, that's why it might be confusing you).

By the way- cold pasta is like potatoes, it has some of it's carbs cool into resistant starch.

Twizzler
12-05-2011, 02:32 AM
What should I be looking for, foods that are low in carbs or low in sugar? All the whole wheat pastas I saw had the same number of carbs as regular pasta.

You should focus on the carb content as well as the fiber. Look at the grams of fiber and subtract that nuymber from the amount of carbs per serving. This will give you your net carbs for a particular food.

My father was given the following target numbers for each meal:
40 carbs for breakfast
40-60 carbs for lunch
40-60 carbs for dinner
Two snacks- each with no more than 20 carbs

He switched to Pepperidge Farm "Carb Style" wheat bread, and generally uses whole grain products. Lots of veggies. The trick is finding food that fills him up. Yes, he can eat pizza, for example, but generally only a slice or so before he goes over his limit for the meal. Not really filling.

I want to stress that THESE ARE HIS NUMBERS!!! Your husband needs to see a specialist to be put on a program that works for him. I hope with diet and exercise he can turn this around. Good luck!!

Japanfan
12-05-2011, 08:11 AM
Lots of info about Type 2 diabetes and recipes here: http://robin-ellis.net/

For those who remember the BBC series "Poldark", it's the website of Robin Ellis who played Ross Poldark. He's published a book of recipes for diabetic and posts lots of interesting snippets about his current life in the French countryside.

tralfamadorian
12-05-2011, 08:24 AM
I recommend that you read up a bit on the paleo/paleolithic diet, I'm not familiar with English language resources on this subject, so here are just two sample hits (Like this one http://paleodietlifestyle.com/ or this one http://altmed.creighton.edu/Paleodiet/Details.html) or a blog intended for diabetes and paleo diet specifically http://paleodiabetic.com/2011/11/06/ucsf-investigating-paleolithic-diet-for-diabetics/

The idea (very simplified) is that we are genetically most suited to consume foods that have been consumed for many many thousands of years before "civilization" ie. to eat the same way as cavemen. In practical terms, a strict paleo diet completely excludes all grains, dairy and legumes (and of course all processed foods) which leaves lean meats tons of vegetables, some fruit (some fruits are very high in sugars thouhgh) and good fats, so the end result is a low carb (and enjoyable) diet.

It's not necessarily something that has to be followed to the letter IMO, but it's very much worth to explore the research behind it and adapt to this lifestyle somewhat, it seems to work wonders for a lot of people and there's research to support that it very much helps with type 2 diabetes. (eg. http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2010/05/5986/type-2-diabetes-cholesterol-heart-disease-kidney-risks-paleolithic-diet)

Japanfan
12-05-2011, 12:37 PM
I don't think I could follow the paleo diet although I sort of tend in that direction in that I cook a lot of roasts meats and make meat soups from scratch (for example, the broth bath I roast a turkey in is a good base for quite a few soups). I don't care for frozen prepared meals or most packaged foods just because I find don't like how they taste. Ditto fast foods - I don't like the fat they are cooked in. I don't worry about fat too much, too be honest. If I roast a chicken, I eat the skin. For cooking, I prefer olive oil to butter.

All that said, I don't eat meat every day. I do like cheese though, as an alternative.

My first question about this diet is its inclusion of butter. Hunter gathers did not eat butter, it was an agricultural product that was first produced at about the same time as cheese. Milk would probably have been the first dairy product, before butter. If butter is okay, milk and cheese could arguably be as well.

Plus, just because hunter gathers didn't eat legumes and grains doesn't mean that grains and legumes are unhealthy. The introduction of these food products into the human diet improved health and life expectancy.

Hunter gatherers used to hunt their meat, which was hard and dangerous work. When game was scarce, many died. Since we don't hunt and gather anymore, we don't need need to eat as if we do.

Aboriginals used to make and store pemmican - a mix of fat and berries - to get them through the lean season. I'd love some of that every day for breakfast, but am not so sure it's a good idea.

MacMadame
12-05-2011, 04:15 PM
My first question about this diet is its inclusion of butter. Hunter gathers did not eat butter, it was an agricultural product that was first produced at about the same time as cheese. Milk would probably have been the first dairy product, before butter. If butter is okay, milk and cheese could arguably be as well.

Plus, just because hunter gathers didn't eat legumes and grains doesn't mean that grains and legumes are unhealthy. The introduction of these food products into the human diet improved health and life expectancy.

Hunter gatherers used to hunt their meat, which was hard and dangerous work. When game was scarce, many died. Since we don't hunt and gather anymore, we don't need need to eat as if we do.

Aboriginals used to make and store pemmican - a mix of fat and berries - to get them through the lean season. I'd love some of that every day for breakfast, but am not so sure it's a good idea.
Actually this diet is based on a movie-version of what paleo man ate. There were already some villages were limited agriculture was going on during the paleo time and their diet varied quite a bit based on geography. In some parts of the world, they consumed dairy!

On top of that, there have been some major gene shifts since those times including one that specifically gave us a better ability to digest dairy and grains.

It's processed foods that are relatively new on the food chain and we haven't really adapted well to yet because it's been such a short time.

Vash01
12-05-2011, 04:34 PM
I would recommend seeing a nutritionist about this, to figure out meal plans.

Just off the top of my head, whole grains, veggies, fruit are good (that's true even if you don't have Diabetes). Small amounts of desserts can still be eaten (e.g. a small mint after a meal), but you have to be very disciplined about it. Like any diet, an occasional slip won't hurt that much, as long as it is only occasional.

Fruits have sugar. Fructose is better than white sugar, but it still is a sugar, so the amount needs to be controlled. A balanced meal and regular moderate exercise (more than anything else) is the key to controlling blood glucose.

PDilemma
12-05-2011, 05:14 PM
Actually this diet is based on a movie-version of what paleo man ate. There were already some villages were limited agriculture was going on during the paleo time and their diet varied quite a bit based on geography. In some parts of the world, they consumed dairy!

On top of that, there have been some major gene shifts since those times including one that specifically gave us a better ability to digest dairy and grains.

It's processed foods that are relatively new on the food chain and we haven't really adapted well to yet because it's been such a short time.

MacMadame--no introducing accurate history and physiology into the world of fad diets! :lol:

Next you'll be suggesting that hygiene improved health! And I know some people who have stopped bathing because it is natural that do not want to hear that! (Seriously, I know a couple who no longer bath or even wash their hands because ancient people allegedly did not and they were allegedly healthier--it is pretty gross!)

Ajax
12-05-2011, 05:15 PM
I'm glad someone recommended the paleo diet. I myself have been doing a version of the paleo diet for almost a year. It's called the primal blueprint and the main difference with paleo is that it includes dairy. I really recommend checking this out - the diet may seem a little extreme at first but once you get used to it, it is easy and enjoyable. I don't have any diabetes issues, but my health improved noticeably and I lost a lot of weight with it. Since it's a low carb diet, a large number of people who follow it have reported that their diabetes disappeared or became a lot more manageable.
Here's their guide to diabetes: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/diabetes/
And here's the quick guide to what you should eat and not eat:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/introducing-the-new-primal-blueprint-food-pyramid/

michiruwater
12-05-2011, 07:25 PM
You want to look at carbs and fiber, but primarily at carbs.

Whole wheat pasta and white pasta will have the same amount of carbohydrates. However, the carbs in the whole wheat pasta are significantly more complex than the refined carbs of the white pasta. Therefore, it takes longer to digest, and his bloodsugar won't spike. White flour will cause blood sugar to spike very quickly.

AnnM
12-05-2011, 11:59 PM
I had gestational diabetes while pregnant and had to meet with a nutritionist/CDE. What worked to keep my numbers down:

1. Avoid milk & fruit in the morning.

2. Breakfast needed to have the lowest carb count & was usually one slice of buttered toast with 1-2 eggs.

3. Eat a mid-morning and mid-afternoon snack that had a healthy balance of carbs/protein/fat. Some of my staples were string cheese & nuts; half a protein bar; greek or icelandic yogurt; 1 piece of fruit with peanut butter; fresh veggies with ranch dip; mini-antipasti plate; tuna/chicken salad with crackers.

4. Limiting fruit to two servings per day, preferably citrus or berries.

5. Portion controlled lunches & dinners, especially with regard to carb portions. I could eat white rice, pasta, etc., but it had to be only 1/3 -1/2 a cup.

6. Exercising 15-20 minutes after dinner.

7. BEDTIME SNACK. It seemed counterintuitive for me to eat when I wasn't hungry, but my fasting AM sugars were always highest when I skipped my nighttime snack. 4-6oz of skim milk was the best for me.

8. Make sure to stay well hydrated.

Fortunately my numbers returned to normal after I delivered, but I'm still at a greater risk to develop type 2 because of it. I don't eat exactly like this anymore, but I'm still mindful of carbs and always try to maintain a higher protein diet.

MacMadame
12-06-2011, 12:13 AM
they were allegedly healthier

This is what I don't get. Ancient humans had a lifespan of something like 35 years. Of course they weren't healthier!

Now, I do think that we have strayed from some healthy habits. We eat too much processed foods, too big portions, and we are too obsessed with germs. (As a society, not as individuals, of course).

But some people romanticize the past too much, if you ask me.

Ajax
12-06-2011, 05:25 PM
This is what I don't get. Ancient humans had a lifespan of something like 35 years. Of course they weren't healthier!


They had a lifespan of 35 years mostly because they got killed by the game they were hunting, or broke a leg and died of infection etc. Their short lifespans were due accident, starvation or infection, not diabetes, heart attacks or cholesterol - and have you ever seen a fat man in cave paintings??