PDA

View Full Version : Skater Mervin Tran mulls turning Japanese



Pages : 1 2 3 [4]

ponta1
11-17-2011, 06:45 AM
I've been catching up on some of their past performances; I've never really took notice of them (well, of pairs in general) before. They are so good together!! Narumi is very expressive, and she doesn't have a bad outfit. (Maybe Mao can go to her dress designer?)

ltnskater
11-17-2011, 02:37 PM
I have to agree with the majority of the posts here, it is much more likely for them to compete for Canada at the Olympics than for Japan based on citizenship issues.

That being said, I really don't think they will go anywhere to the next level regardless of what country they represent until Narumi fixes her jumps. What I mean by that is being a serious contender for the podium at Worlds/Olympics, and not just for example, a flash in the pan world bronze like Dube/Davison had in 2008 when other pairs have a bad day and they skate amazing. (Though that was a lovely skate and one of my favourites to this day, well deserved bronze!)

Jenna
11-17-2011, 02:39 PM
:rofl:
Maybe you should check again.

It's not worth it, I really do not care. :lol:

Ziggy
11-18-2011, 05:33 AM
If the special exception provision has never ever been invoked, it definitely isn't going to be invoked for a second tier (in Ministry of Justice's eyes, not mine) pair skating team.

I can't see how it could possibly happen.

And you can't really expect Narumi to give up her citizenship either.

It's a shame that Japanese citizenship rules are so strict. :(

As far as Reeds are concerned, I imagine that if they wanted to get their US citizenship back, it wouldn't be difficult because of their father and having lived in US all their lives?


It's not worth it, I really do not care. :lol:

You care enough to keep posting. :P

Jenna
11-18-2011, 05:36 AM
I only post to respond to comments addressed to me, like this one. :P

GarrAarghHrumph
11-18-2011, 02:34 PM
As far as Reeds are concerned, I imagine that if they wanted to get their US citizenship back, it wouldn't be difficult because of their father and having lived in US all their lives?


I don't know how easy it would be for them. To lose their US citizenship, they had to formally renounce it. That's a big deal. I don't know what that would mean re: their immigration status in the US.

danceronice
11-18-2011, 05:32 PM
I don't know how easy it would be for them. To lose their US citizenship, they had to formally renounce it. That's a big deal. I don't know what that would mean re: their immigration status in the US.

If you actually surrender your citizenship, it's a massive hassle to get it back. The US makes it very hard, and they'll keep asking if you're sure and try to talk you out of it. They don't want expats skipping out on their taxes and then coming crying back when they're in trouble in their new country. Once you really go through with it, you have to surrender your passport and other documents, and you have to show you've got somewhere to go that's already agreed to take you.

Japan, meanwhile, is easier to leave, hard to get into. Heck, Japan is hard on their non-dominant native ethnic groups. But then, never underestimate the power of a sports lobby that's on the rise in popularity. Especially if he's at all ethnic Japanese. But he'd have to be REALLY sure about giving up Canadian citizenship and their fed would have to make a VERY strong argument the team will perform.

GarrAarghHrumph
11-18-2011, 05:36 PM
If you actually surrender your citizenship, it's a massive hassle to get it back. The US makes it very hard, and they'll keep asking if you're sure and try to talk you out of it. They don't want expats skipping out on their taxes and then coming crying back when they're in trouble in their new country. Once you really go through with it, you have to surrender your passport and other documents, and you have to show you've got somewhere to go that's already agreed to take you.

Japan, meanwhile, is easier to leave, hard to get into. Heck, Japan is hard on their non-dominant native ethnic groups. But then, never underestimate the power of a sports lobby that's on the rise in popularity. Especially if he's at all ethnic Japanese. But he'd have to be REALLY sure about giving up Canadian citizenship and their fed would have to make a VERY strong argument the team will perform.

I don't think he's of Japanese decent. Based on how he looks, I'm guessing he's Vietnamese decent, or perhaps Cambodian? People I know with the last name "Tran" are Vietnamese.

Vagabond
11-18-2011, 05:43 PM
He has said his parents came from Vietnam and Cambodia as refugees.

http://www.skatetoday.com/2008/08/30/young-team-gives-japan-hope-for-future/

Tran is a very common Vietnamese surname, so it's probably his mother who is from Cambodia.

kwanfan1818
11-18-2011, 06:29 PM
The US makes it very hard, and they'll keep asking if you're sure and try to talk you out of it. They don't want expats skipping out on their taxes and then coming crying back when they're in trouble in their new country.
For people who renounce their citizenship and are high earners, they still are required to pay US taxes for ten years after the renunciation.


That's a big deal. I don't know what that would mean re: their immigration status in the US.
This sounded like the reason that Kristian Rand's former partner, Caitlin Mallory, refused to take Estonian citizenship for the Vancouver Olympics, since she was training and going to school (or planning to go to college) in the US. She was given the option of having the Estonian citizenship "expire" after five years, too, and she decided it wouldn't work.

DORISPULASKI
11-18-2011, 06:45 PM
If I remember correctly, it messed up how much she had to pay to go to college. Scholarships or tax breaks or student loans, I don't remember which.

Jot the Dot Dot
11-18-2011, 07:35 PM
Somehow a 'Tran'........'Turning Japanese', is just one too many metaphors for me :yikes::scream::slinkaway