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Yukari Lepisto
11-15-2011, 12:57 AM
If Tran wants to go to the Olympics, I know a lovely US skater who would look very good skating with him. Much easier for him to get US citizenship. :saint:

omg, i just thought about this a couple of days ago, but then i think Caitlin might be a bit too tall for him?

But no, we want Mervin to go to Olympics with Narumi! :lol:

easilydistracte
11-15-2011, 01:07 AM
But no, we want Mervin to go to Olympics with Narumi! :lol:
Absolutely! Their chemistry is what makes them special!

rfisher
11-15-2011, 01:10 AM
omg, i just thought about this a couple of days ago, but then i think Caitlin might be a bit too tall for him?

But no, we want Mervin to go to Olympics with Narumi! :lol:

Sadly, I think the odds of that happening are slim to none. He'd have a much better chance with Caitlin. But, I like he and Narumi and don't care where they compete as long as they do.

ks777
11-15-2011, 03:53 AM
Your parent doesn't have to be Japanese to obtain a japanese citizenship.
Rugby players become japanese nationals all the time.
http://ajw.asahi.com/article/sports/AJ201109038085

julieann
11-15-2011, 04:16 AM
Your parent doesn't have to be Japanese to obtain a japanese citizenship.
Rugby players become japanese nationals all the time.
http://ajw.asahi.com/article/sports/AJ201109038085

No one said they have to be, but did you read the article?


Nicholas went through roughly 10 interviews and screenings to become a Japanese national.

"It took more than a year, but I was really happy," he says. "Right now, I feel so proud of being Japanese."

Fullback Webb, a key playmaker on Team Japan, says, "Japan is home to me. I've lived here for seven years. When I leave Japan, it makes me want to come back home to Fukuoka (where he is based while in Japan)."

Not exactly the same situation in Tran's case.

Yukari Lepisto
11-15-2011, 04:39 AM
I think if Narumi can make her triples consistent, i don't see how they'll have problem qualifying to worlds or olympics if they want to represent canada. They'll have to sit out a year if they decide to represent Canada, can use that year to get Narumi's triples consistent, maybe learn new technique, etc?

The question is... is she willing to make the change.........

Jenna
11-15-2011, 04:52 AM
Honestly, it seems like that is the best bet at this point. I don't know if they could beat both D/R and M-T/M on good days though. She needs serious help on her triple jumps. Her technique is pretty bad.

flowerpower
11-15-2011, 05:08 AM
I think if Narumi can make her triples consistent, i don't see how they'll have problem qualifying to worlds or olympics if they want to represent canada. They'll have to sit out a year if they decide to represent Canada, can use that year to get Narumi's triples consistent, maybe learn new technique, etc?

The question is... is she willing to make the change.........

Narumi has been training in Canada for several years and will continue to train in Canada (most likely), so establishing residency for Canadian citizenship wouldn't be a problem. Japan doesn't allow dual citizenship though, so she'd have to give up her Japanese citizenship as Yuko Kavaguti did, and I gather it would be very hard to get it back. (Although she's certainly become well-established in Canada, so perhaps she could accept that; I don't know.)

It would be far harder for Mervin to get Japanese citizenship. On top of that, because of Japanese rules he'd have to give up his Canadian citizenship (although Canada might be willing to give it back later; that's what I was speculating about earlier - anyone know?).

If they're happy to continue skating at Worlds, then they can just go on as they are. But if they really want to go to the Olympics, it'll likely have to be for Canada.

kwanfan1818
11-15-2011, 05:19 AM
According to at least one article at the time Kavaguti was in the process of obtaining Russian citizenship, she could apply after ten years to have her Japanese citizenship reinstated.

It seems odd that the Ministry of Justice would consider participation in the Olympics, even enabling Japan to compete in the Team Event, -- and I haven't seen anything published that the Reeds, both over 22, made the decision to give up their US citizenship and choose Japanese citizenship when the time came, which would impact whether Japan could have a team even with T/T. -- extraordinary. The Japanese set a very high bar for extraordinary in general.

Vagabond
11-15-2011, 05:31 AM
I haven't seen anything published that the Reeds, both over 22, made the decision to give up their US citizenship and choose Japanese citizenship when the time came, which would impact whether Japan could have a team even with T/T

Cathy Reed has indeed chosen Japanese citizenship:

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/sports/feature/figure/fi20091117_02.htm (in Japanese).

I haven't read anything about what her brother has decided to do, but I'm sure they discussed this before she renounced her American citizenship.

yukky
11-15-2011, 06:25 AM
>Cathy Reed has indeed chosen Japanese citizenship.

but,she does not have to give up her U.S. citizenship right away or no due to do so.

only she has to make effort to give up, but since she has to train in US,she has good reason to keep the US citizenship.

DORISPULASKI
11-15-2011, 07:56 AM
Chris turned 22 in July so he must choose to give up US citizenship, if they want to attempt to qualify for a second Olympics, skating for Japan.

Hedwig
11-15-2011, 10:36 AM
That's only an example, and last time I checked, you don't work for the Japanese government.

:rofl:
Maybe you should check again.

GarrAarghHrumph
11-16-2011, 04:22 PM
The fact is we've had Japanese citizens being the ones to give up (Inoue and Kavaguti) but never the reverse AFAIK.



One thing that the article and Wikipedia don't mention: you need to speak (hard) and write (really really freaking hard) fluent Japanese in order to obtain citizenship. There are a lot of forms to fill out and an entire interview process, and they must be conducted in Japanese. No exceptions. He may have picked up a decent amount of Japanese by speaking with Narumi/her family/any translators around her, but there's no way he developed the necessary facility with the written language while skating at such a high level.


Cathy Reed has indeed chosen Japanese citizenship:

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/sports/feature/figure/fi20091117_02.htm (in Japanese).

I haven't read anything about what her brother has decided to do, but I'm sure they discussed this before she renounced her American citizenship.


>Cathy Reed has indeed chosen Japanese citizenship.

but,she does not have to give up her U.S. citizenship right away or no due to do so.

only she has to make effort to give up, but since she has to train in US,she has good reason to keep the US citizenship.


Chris turned 22 in July so he must choose to give up US citizenship, if they want to attempt to qualify for a second Olympics, skating for Japan.

Chris and Cathy are both now Japanese citizens. They did have to give up their US citizenship in order to do this - that is a requirement of the Japanese government. You can not be a dual national in Japan - you are either a Japanese citizen, or you are not, so they had to give up their US citizenship when they did this - not something taken lightly. Both speak a certain amount of Japanese, but neither claim to be fluent.

kwanfan1818
11-16-2011, 04:49 PM
They shouldn't have to be fluent in spoken or written Japanese if they are citizens by birth, in this case through their mother. They might not have to speak any Japanese. The fluency requirement is for naturalization.