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GarrAarghHrumph
11-08-2011, 07:14 PM
There will be a test of the US's National Emergency Alert system on Wednesday, November 9th, at 2pm. So, like, don't freak out or anything.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2011/11/national-emergency-alert-test-to-be-held-wednesday/


The test will occur at 2 p.m. ET and will be carried on all broadcast television, radio stations and cable and satellite television systems in the U.S. and U.S. territories.

This is the first nationwide test of the system. Enjoy!

Tesla
11-08-2011, 07:19 PM
Too bad I'll be at work and can't hear the test. Does this mean I'm screwed in the future? :P

Vash01
11-08-2011, 08:03 PM
Assuming it's at 2 pm EST, I will be in transit, on my way to Washington DC. I wonder if we will be told about it while in the air?

Aceon6
11-08-2011, 08:18 PM
My town just used it's emergency notification system to text me about the test tomorrow. Geez!

Despite all the notifications, I'm sure they'll be some folks who jump on 9-1-1 as if the Martians are landing.

nubka
11-08-2011, 08:25 PM
When I was a kid in the 60's, those tests would scare me so bad. Everytime they came on, I was convinced that Soviet Union had a nuke on the way at that very moment. :scream: :scream: :scream: :scream:

Reuven
11-08-2011, 11:44 PM
Also growing up in the 50s and 60s, I always listened to what used to be called The Emergency Broadcast System, waiting for the words, "This is a test, this is only a test. In the event of a emergency your local station will have further instructions. This station serves the XXXXXXX area.”
Then, after not hearing those for quite some time in the late 70s, early 80s, as I was driving to work, the damn alert goes off, followed by a loooonnnnggg pause. And my immediate thought was, Oh sh!t, they’ve launched!” But before I could turn round to head home to collect Mrs Reuven, they announced it was a weather warning. Since I had NEVER heard them use the system for a weather event, I think it was understandable this child of the Cold War was a little askeert at first. :lol:

maatTheViking
11-09-2011, 12:17 AM
in Denmark, going to scool in late 80's there were still a bomb-siren test every first wednesday of the month at noon.

not that it would probably have helped much, after the fall of the East block I remeber reading that there were 56 neuclear warheads pointed at Denmark. Happy that the cold war stayed cold.

on another note, I could not watch cable last night, stuck on the EAS screen :(

my little pony
11-09-2011, 12:41 AM
during the hurricane we had an emergency alert saying, "if you are outside, lay down." i am glad that everyone watching tv outside in the hurricane was prepared.

FigureSpins
11-09-2011, 01:45 AM
Our campus tested its emergency siren and public address system on Monday. They sent out an announcement in advance.

I hope it doesn't turn into a War of the Worlds re-enactment.

Aussie Willy
11-09-2011, 07:12 AM
We do evacuation drills at work. Everyone heads to the cafe for coffee. Which is on our complex and my first thought is if a fire was going to start then it would be in the cafe.

Vash01
11-09-2011, 07:15 AM
We do evacuation drills at work. Everyone heads to the cafe for coffee. Which is on our complex and my first thought is if a fire was going to start then it would be in the cafe.


When we have evaculation drills at work, we have to go outside the building. Sometimes it gets annoying when it's very hot outside, like in summer.

Reuven
11-09-2011, 11:06 AM
We do evacuation drills at work. Everyone heads to the cafe for coffee. Which is on our complex and my first thought is if a fire was going to start then it would be in the cafe.Well, gotta check just to be sure. Oh, whilst we're here, coffee? ;)

FGRSK8
11-09-2011, 11:22 AM
Reuven, don't forget "duck and cover".

If you see the flash, get under your desk.......:eek:

Boy were we ignorant in the 50s...:P

I still remember the film clip that shows a young boy seeing the flash, hiding under the sports section of the NY Times...:rofl:

Skittl1321
11-09-2011, 01:41 PM
How is this test different from the tests of the "emergency broadcast system" that are on ALL the time?


Our city tests its tornado sirens the first monday of every month at 9:00. It used to be the 2nd of every month, so there was a bit of a scare when they changed it by people who don't read the newspaper/news online. I don't think they did a great job publicizing the change.

When we have fire alarms we have to go outside too. SUCKS in the winter, especially if someone was just popping popcorn (not allowed, it sets the alarms off all the time. Every microwave has a "no popcorn" sign on it.) For tornado sirens we have to go sit in the hallway downstairs. Half of them have occured as I was walking out of work, and then I always call my husband to find out what part of the county the tornado is in (big county, but the alarm sounds for ALL of it) to see if I can go home rather than sit in a hallway for an hour (unpaid). I think they use the sirens too easily now. It used to mean "a tornado is on the ground", now it seems to mean "radar indicates we could have tornadic weather". They are beginning to cry wolf, and that makes them unsafe.

GarrAarghHrumph
11-09-2011, 01:47 PM
How is this test different from the tests of the "emergency broadcast system" that are on ALL the time?

This is the first nationwide test, and as I understand it, I don't think it's going to say it's a test.