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RumbleFish
10-27-2011, 10:02 AM
You're a Native English speaker? :eek:

No, I'm not. That's why I'm relieved. :confused:

leafygreens
10-27-2011, 12:11 PM
Well now that a quad lutz has been landed in competition the Men's world and Olympic champions must land it or the sport will be going backwards ;)


:rofl::rofl:

essence_of_soy
10-27-2011, 12:59 PM
I have this picture in my head of Tom Zakrajsek angrily typing up a letter to the ISU demanding they de-gay the announcement. :P

Don't ask? Don't lutz?

senorita
10-27-2011, 01:26 PM
In greek homologates (exact same root) means to confess, or better to admit. When I read the title I thought ISU had done something bad and made up for it.

FigureSpins
10-27-2011, 01:39 PM
No one noticed the creative spelling in the new release?


"This is reportedly the first quadruble Lutz performed in any sanctioned competition. "
Wonder how many rubles the quad cost and if *that* was a freudian slip?

LilJen
10-27-2011, 02:04 PM
No one wants to debate whether a jump in a non-ISU competition should have been ratified (homologated, whatever) as THE first?

((((Adam R :wuzrobbed)))) (maybe)

Jozet
10-27-2011, 02:09 PM
No one wants to debate whether a jump in a non-ISU competition should have been ratified (homologated, whatever) as THE first?


I'm still wondering if there is something different between ratifying and homologating...or is the only difference being a fancy pants with the thesaurus?

Skittl1321
10-27-2011, 02:15 PM
I'm still wondering if there is something different between ratifying and homologating...or is the only difference being a fancy pants with the thesaurus?

The dictionary I used to look up homologate defined it as "to ratify".

It's just another (more obscure) word for it.

I wonder what the situation was that they chose to use it. Did the person who wrote the press release actually think it was the best word? Were they using a Thesaurus to find important sounding words? Was it one of those situations where you can't think of the simple word to save your life, so you have to use the fancy pants one?

It reminds me of an episode of "Friends" where Joey is writing a recommendation letter for Monica and Chandler to adopt a baby, and he uses a thesaurus on every word, and signs the letter "Baby Kangaroo"

Jozet
10-27-2011, 02:27 PM
The dictionary I used to look up homologate defined it as "to ratify".

It's just another (more obscure) word for it.



That's what I'm thinking now. My first impression was that because this wasn't an ISU competition that they wanted to recognize it, but not quite so much as in an ISU, YKWIM?

But yeah, I can see now that I was totally over-thinking it.

BTW, good to know that the skating crowd is also a highly literate word-geek crowd. I think I've found my people, lol.

gkelly
10-27-2011, 02:41 PM
I wonder what the situation was that they chose to use it. Did the person who wrote the press release actually think it was the best word? Were they using a Thesaurus to find important sounding words? Was it one of those situations where you can't think of the simple word to save your life, so you have to use the fancy pants one?

I assumed it was the possibility suggested in the first page of this thread -- the person who wrote it was a native speaker of a language in which the homologous cognate word is more commonly used.

emason
10-27-2011, 02:51 PM
I assumed it was the possibility suggested in the first page of this thread -- the person who wrote it was a native speaker of a language in which the homologous cognate word is more commonly used.

This. Also, I think the word is just more formal, sort of as if the announcement was written in some form of ISU legalese.

ciocio
10-27-2011, 03:18 PM
This. Also, I think the word is just more formal, sort of as if the announcement was written in some form of ISU legalese.

Or the announcement was written by a French speaker. :)

crystalice
10-27-2011, 03:18 PM
Very exciting day for him. I'm glad the ISU made this decision.

:mad: Why? It wasn't an ISU event. Unless it was a homololdate of ISU and USFSA, then it makes sense. :lol:

minuet
10-27-2011, 03:59 PM
Regarding the use of the word "homologate"... I think it might be an international federation thing. Prior to the Vancouver 2010 Games, some of the facilities had to be approved by the international federations. This was called the homologation process. So, for instance, the sliding track had to be homologated (ratified/approved) by FIL (international luge federation) and FIBT (international bobsleigh/skeleton federation). The ski jumps had to be homologated by FIS (international ski federation). Each year those federations release a list of all of their homologated venues around the world. So it's definitely a word that gets used a lot in those circles so it's not surprising that the ISU would also use that word.

But good for Brandon... watching that video again I'm still impressed by the cleanliness of the quad lutz.

Jozet
10-27-2011, 04:16 PM
Ahhhh! Duh me...missed that. Yes, pardon my USA-English-speaking-centric POV.

I did spend some time in France and can order off a menu, but wasn't following the skating world at the time. Also, wasn't homologating anything abroad myself.

btw, if you Google homologate, there are also a lot of references to racing car engines, so definitely a macho word. Figure skating should stick with it. A homologated quad lutz sounds very Indy 500. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homologation_(motorsport)