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MacMadame
10-16-2011, 09:01 PM
This week was set up by the sorority Delta Delta Delta (the Tri-Delts) and is a way to get women (and men too) to stop ragging on ourselves about our bodies and our perceived imperfections and stop focusing so much on weight.

From their website:

Fat Talk describes all of the statements made in everyday conversation that reinforce the thin-ideal standard of female beauty and contribute to women's dissatisfaction with their bodies. Examples of fat talk may include: "I'm so fat," "Do I look fat in this?" "I need to lose 10 pounds" and "She's too fat to be wearing that swimsuit." Statements that are considered fat talk don't necessarily have to be negative; they can seem positive yet also reinforce the need to be thin - "You look great! Have you lost weight?"

The motto of "Fat Talk Free" Week is "friends don't let friends fat talk".

To read my blog post about it, click here (http://fattyfightsback.blogspot.com/2011/10/today-is-first-day-of-fat-talk-free.html)

To find out more about the week, click here (http://endfattalk.org)

PrincessLeppard
10-17-2011, 12:39 AM
I will attempt this. :)

Really
10-17-2011, 01:48 AM
I will attempt this. :):P

MacMadame
10-17-2011, 02:15 AM
I will attempt this. :)

:cheer:

Seriously, it's up to us adults to set a good example for our kids...

Badams
10-17-2011, 02:26 AM
I will try to do this too. What a great idea.

Really
10-17-2011, 03:07 AM
:cheer:

Seriously, it's up to us adults to set a good example for our kids...I actually have a running joke with one of my grade 9 girls. She was complaining one day last year about being overweight -- she's not even close! I said to her, "Yeah, you're just obese!" She looked at me in shock at first, then realized the ridiculousness of her complaint. Every once in awhile, when someone's talking about weight, she'll bring it up again, always with a big grin. She's never again said she was overweight.

I work with a very vulnerable age group, and I hope I'm a good model to them in that I try to eat well, and I work out regularly. But I also don't go into a million depressions because I'm not in a size 6 anymore. I want them to like themselves and not be so overly critical of their own bodies.

PrincessLeppard
10-17-2011, 03:20 AM
I work with a very vulnerable age group, and I hope I'm a good model to them in that I try to eat well, and I work out regularly. But I also don't go into a million depressions because I'm not in a size 6 anymore. I want them to like themselves and not be so overly critical of their own bodies.

This. Also, I get overly critical of myself (which I know is ridiculous) and I need to stop that as well. :)

MacMadame
10-17-2011, 03:37 AM
Yes, I have to be careful because I travel in washboard abs territory. Many people in my tri club are taller than me yet weight less and it can put me into a million depressions because I'll never be as thin as them.

For one thing, I like my muscles and I'm not willing to lose them to get the number on the scale to go lower.

Aussie Willy
10-17-2011, 03:45 AM
One place I worked at years ago the women constantly talked about their weight. It is such a boring topic of conversation.

vesperholly
10-17-2011, 04:06 AM
Great plan. It dismays me how easy and pervasive fat-bashing is - both from people hating on themselves and millions of casual slams equating fat with bad. No one would say "she's too black", but I hear and read "she's too fat" and variants thereof daily. Sad.

Karina1974
10-17-2011, 04:26 AM
For one thing, I like my muscles and I'm not willing to lose them to get the number on the scale to go lower.

Heh... I like mine too, especially since the leg ones are aching from all the contra dancing and cycling I did this weekend.

Angelskates
10-17-2011, 11:41 AM
What a fabulous idea. I, too, a going to give it a go.

taf2002
10-17-2011, 07:24 PM
Unfortunately, I can't go along with this. I have always had a bad body image, even when I had a :kickass: body. I look at pictures of me when I weighed about 105 lbs or less & I remember thinking that I was fat at the time. I would love to be that size now. But I think I'm too old to change my way of thinking. However I think it's a wonderful idea.

MacMadame
10-17-2011, 09:43 PM
One way to change your way of thinking is to act like you already believe the new way of thinking. This is actually one of the techniques of cognative behavior therapy, which is the only kind of psychological therapy that I can stand. :lol:

The interesting thing, to me, about having a Fat Talk Free week is the statistics. It's been shown that people who do the most Fat Talk have the worst body images. But correlation is not causation. Maybe they do the most Fat Talk because they have bad body images vs. the fat talk causing the bad body image.

So then the question is: if you have a bad body image and you cut out (or significantly cut down) your Fat Talk, will your body image improve or not?

I think it should. I also think making this sort of talk less socially acceptable will help younger generations from ever getting into that trap to begin with. But I can see an argument for the other side ... that the Fat Talk is a symptom and fixing the symptom won't cure the problem.

vesperholly
10-17-2011, 09:52 PM
I think it should. I also think making this sort of talk less socially acceptable will help younger generations from ever getting into that trap to begin with. But I can see an argument for the other side ... that the Fat Talk is a symptom and fixing the symptom won't cure the problem.

Maybe, but by talking about the symptom, we're shedding light on the real cause. I don't think for a minute that anyone really believes that not saying denigrating things about your own body is going to solve self-esteem issues, however, but hopefully it'll get some people who do speak poorly of themselves to examine their hurtful words.

and maybe it'll get those of us who joke about being fat to stop accidentally projecting an image of self-loathing :shuffle: