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mmscfdcsu
10-15-2011, 03:37 AM
http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2011/10/14/woman-told-to-stop-giving-dying-co-worker-cpr/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl11%7Csec1_lnk2%7C104571

Wow! It okay to take a break for this. Really! :eek: (Worker told to stop CPR on a colleague and get back to work)

barbk
10-15-2011, 03:55 AM
I can't imagine how that manager can look himself in the mirror each day, or what in the world Time Warner communications is thinking.

danceronice
10-15-2011, 04:13 AM
You know, even if we buy both that they have a policy to not let employees give emergency response because of liability AND they don't know about the Good Samaritan law (not as completely unreasonable as it seems; the Good Samaritan laws are because you can kill or make an injured person worse really easily, especially with chest compressions), the correct way to say it is not "Get back to helping customers." At the worst it's "Call 911." Don't they have an automated defibrilator? Even our office has one. Yeah, if her heart is STOPPED it would just tell you to start compressions (unlike on TV shocking doesn't help if they're flatlined) but if shocking would help it could have saved her. We all know where ours is and had to be shown how it works as part of our training. And we're teeny. Don't they have any kind of policy? Are Time Warner employees just supposed to ignore colleagues who keel over? Remind me never to work there.

BigB08822
10-15-2011, 04:34 AM
I don't even know what to say...

That is disgusting. If they have rules in place then they are horrible rules.

nerdycool
10-15-2011, 06:55 AM
Wow.

And FTR, if I were the person needing CPR, I probably wouldn't care if someone broke a rib. If it's that or waiting to see if I live long enough for the paramedics to get there, I think I'd take my chances on someone who may or may not have had CPR training.

Vash01
10-15-2011, 06:59 AM
I hope the family of the deceased sues Time Warner for their "procedures in place". However, nothing can replace the family member they lost.:(

Cyn
10-15-2011, 07:45 AM
*gobsmacked*

That freaking asshat of a supervisor needs to be hung out to dry, and Time/Warner needs to seriously review and revise their so-called "policy."

Unfortunately, asshats like this exist in several places. I found out from my former supervisor at the store where I used to work, an employee fell in the stockroom and couldn't get up. Because no one heard her hollering for help due to the cutbacks on the number of employees on the floor (the closes employee to the stockroom was at least 60 feet away from the door), she was in there for 45 minutes before someone found her. When the store manager found out what happened, rather than call the paramedics, have an employee take her to the hospital. or - novel idea here - him drive her, he made her wait until her husband could pick her up and take her to the ER :eek: :mad: :rolleyes:.

It turned out she wrenched her back and suffered a severe break to her collarbone.

As much as I enjoyed my co-workers and what I did there (as well as needing that job), I am so glad that I no longer work with that jerk-off.

WTF is wrong with some people?!

taf2002
10-15-2011, 02:14 PM
When I saw the workplace was Time-Warner I was not surprised at all. Disgusted yes but not surprised.

Cyn
10-15-2011, 03:44 PM
Here's the link to the original story from WOIO Channel 19 (Cleveland, Ohio's CBS Affiliate):

Video. (http://www.woio.com/story/15681533/time-warner-workers-death-sparks-a-carl-monday-investigation)

What the AOL article did not state was that Time Warner offers CPR classes, which makes the supervisor's order more :rolleyes: :wall:.

The most galling part, however, is that the Call Center *had* an on-site defibrillator, but it was locked in a closet, and the sole person who had a key to it was not in the building when this happened :mad: :wall:.

As for this:


"Time Warner responded appropriately to a medical emergency. Our company has procedures in place to respond to emergencies. We are saddened by the loss of one of our employees who was a co-worker and a friend. Our thoughts are with the family during this difficult time."

"Our thoughts are with the family…." My fat, middle-aged, white ass it is :rolleyes:. I really hope that the police are truly looking into finding some way of bringing charges of Gross Negligence or something along those lines. While I'm not one for promoting the litigiousness in this country for the sake of bringing in a quick buck, this is one case that I would hope that the family has legitimate grounds to sue the Supervisor and/or Time Warner in civil court.

skatesindreams
10-15-2011, 05:39 PM
I suspect they've opened themselves to many lawsuits, from multiple entities.
Beneath contempt!

Vash01
10-15-2011, 05:42 PM
Here's the link to the original story from WOIO Channel 19 (Cleveland, Ohio's CBS Affiliate):

Video. (http://www.woio.com/story/15681533/time-warner-workers-death-sparks-a-carl-monday-investigation)

What the AOL article did not state was that Time Warner offers CPR classes, which makes the supervisor's order more :rolleyes: :wall:.

The most galling part, however, is that the Call Center *had* an on-site defibrillator, but it was locked in a closet, and the sole person who had a key to it was not in the building when this happened :mad: :wall:.

As for this:



"Our thoughts are with the family…." My fat, middle-aged, white ass it is :rolleyes:. I really hope that the police are truly looking into finding some way of bringing charges of Gross Negligence or something along those lines. While I'm not one for promoting the litigiousness in this country for the sake of bringing in a quick buck, this is one case that I would hope that the family has legitimate grounds to sue the Supervisor and/or Time Warner in civil court.

Usually I criticize the frivolous lawsuits, but in this case I really hope the supervisor and Time Warner get sued for their gross negligence, and total lack of concern for the life of a human being. Which customer was more important than the employee who was struggling to survive?

numbers123
10-15-2011, 05:52 PM
When I taught CPR, many people had concerns about breaking ribs and any difficulty they might be in if the harmed the person while giving CPR. In addition to discussing the Good Samaritan Laws, I would say: what would happen if you didn't initiate CPR, death. For a manager or company to say get back to work is inexcusable.

MacMadame
10-15-2011, 06:21 PM
I'm kind of surprised she listened to the manager. If someone told me to stop CPR, I would have just assumed he was one of those people who get hysterical in a crisis and ignored him. Or told him to call 911. (That's one of the things they train you to do in certain first aide classes -- give everyone a job to do. It makes sure certain jobs get done and also keeps people busy so they don't do more harm than good.)

She must have really been scared for her job.

danceronice
10-15-2011, 11:18 PM
The most galling part, however, is that the Call Center *had* an on-site defibrillator, but it was locked in a closet, and the sole person who had a key to it was not in the building when this happened :mad: :wall:.


Presumably next to the fire extinguisher, the tornado evacuation policy, the emergency numbers...yeah, brilliant place to put it. (Ours on campus are in glass boxes with red lights on the top mounted on the wall in places with signs saying there is a station there.)

I kind of wish I had Time Warner's crappy cable (I live in the country, so I have satellite) just so I could cancel it and tell them why...

Aceon6
10-16-2011, 12:18 AM
Have gotten several tweets on this today. Did my part and re-tweeted. I hope the gal who tried to help gets a better job with more money. No way someone that responsible should be stuck in the TWC puppy mill.