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View Full Version : Courtney Hicks out for season with leg injury [Confirmed]



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MacMadame
10-14-2011, 04:21 AM
I studied PT, Ortho, and have been trained by the experts that a broken bone is *more* vulnerable to breaks.
Which, according to the article you posted, is also wrong. :D


But MacMadame was wrong.
So you said. Three times. :lol: I must have really gotten under your skin since you didn't call out anyone else by name who agreed with me or the gal who said a broken bone can never break again. What's up with that? I swear I didn't pee in your corn flakes or anything. :shuffle:

Anyway, I am always happy to get correct information so thanks for posting the article.

Debbie S
10-14-2011, 04:24 AM
Also I remembered reading MacMadame stating that a bone is stronger after a break is healed, I hope it was on this thread. Well the answer is NO. MacMadame was giving false information. Here is a NYT article: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/19/health/19really.html
Basically what it says is the healed bone is not 'stronger' but possibly just as strong as before. I studied PT, Ortho, and have been trained by the experts that a broken bone is *more* vulnerable to breaks. It is an old wive's tale that a broken leg is stronger than the other. Nope. If anything, at best, it is JUST as strong. But MacMadame was wrong. Feel free to cite anything different. At best Courtney will come back to a leg that is just as strong. However, many believe that this is not actually the case, and if she gets a plate in, it will weaken the surrounding bone. This is a big deal. Don't want to rain on a parade, but this could end her career.I think it's a bit premature to talk about the effect on Courtney's career. Courtney is an elite athlete and she did not become one of the country's best skaters by accident. I'm sure if anyone can bounce back and get back to their previous level, Courtney can.

The article you linked does not say the bone will become weaker. It says the bone will regain the strength it had before and is not any more susceptible to a fracture. The process of fully healing a fracture takes a long time; I read that it can be up to 5 years before the bone finishes remodeling, or returning to its pre-fracture state. In my experience, the area at the fracture site is a bit thicker than the rest of the bone (you can feel bumps under the skin), but it will eventually smooth out. I'm at almost 2 years.

Depending on what hardware Courtney gets, she may have some discomfort when she starts skating again. The hardware can probably be removed after about a year but that will mean about 2 months off the ice, so she'll have to carefully weigh her options. Daisuke Takahashi chose to skate last season (the past 2 seasons, actually) with a screw in his knee from his ACL repair and waited until this past summer to have it removed.

Sylvia
10-14-2011, 04:34 AM
I would not be surprised if she retired say in 2013 after never recovering, sorta like Meissner. You reach for the brass ring, and some unfortunately don't get it.
Well, Meissner did get to go to the Olympics and won a World title so I would consider she attained her brass rings, so to speak.

May Courtney :kickass: in the challenging months ahead of recovery and rehabilitation!

skatesindreams
10-14-2011, 05:42 PM
Louise, that's not an appropriate comment at this point,
Let's see what happens before forecasting such "doom and gloom" .

Ziggy
10-15-2011, 12:01 AM
Louise, that's not an appropriate comment at this point,
Let's see what happens before forecasting such "doom and gloom" .

Why isn't it appropriate? It's realistic.

Legs are put under huge amounts of pressure in skating, which means the bone won't be able to heal comfortably.

MacMadame
10-15-2011, 01:04 AM
Legs are put under huge amounts of pressure in skating, which means the bone won't be able to heal comfortably.

If she takes off long enough to heal her bones, they're healed. End of story.

Broken bones are a lot easier to recover from than soft tissue injuries, in fact.

Ziggy
10-15-2011, 01:26 AM
If she takes off long enough to heal her bones, they're healed. End of story.

Of course, but if she wants to continue as an elite athlete, she probably won't be able to take as long as she should.

MacMadame
10-15-2011, 06:14 PM
Of course, but if she wants to continue as an elite athlete, she probably won't be able to take as long as she should.

Her season this year is pretty much over though. That gives her a lot of time to heal before she has to start worrying about next season. Basically, if she wants to continue as an elite athlete, she has to take off as much time as it takes to heal and I don't see any indication she isn't planning to do that.

I worry about athletes not being able to come back a lot more when it's some sort of ligament issue or a back or hip problem.