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milanessa
10-06-2011, 03:23 AM
...... most people have smart phone. Is that not true?

Not me. I usually carry my phone with me when I drive but other than that I couldn't care less about being connected.

Vagabond
10-06-2011, 03:27 AM
I thought all smart phones were made that way these days and that most people have smart phone. Is that not true?

But the incident happened in 2007, in Italy. Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito were college students who presumably were living on comparatively limited budgets, and all the news reports refer to "cell phones" without giving any indication that they were "smart phones." I wouldn't assume that they had smart phones.

mag
10-06-2011, 03:48 AM
Nancy Grace weighs in....still believes she's guilty

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/entertainment/post/2011/10/nancy-grace-amanda-knox-verdict-was-miscarriage-of-justice/1







I haven't followed this at all and have no personal interest in the story, I just happened to see this interview with Grace on some entertainment show as I was flipping through channels

So Nancy Grace thinks Amanda Knox is guilty. Why did the Italians spend all that money on appeals when they could have just asked Nancy ... After all, she obviously knows :rolleyes:
Now I think Nancy is an idiot, but that doesn't make it so ... Oh, wait :rollin:

MacMadame
10-06-2011, 03:52 AM
Nancy Grace weighs in....still believes she's guilty

If anything convinces me of Knox's innocence, it's that. ;)


But the incident happened in 2007, in Italy.

:duh:

But I was mostly confused about you guys talking about how you turned off your phones every night... definitely, when I had one of those older flip phones, I turned it off all the time too.

numbers123
10-06-2011, 04:02 AM
I never turn my phone off (unless I'm on an airplane). Not that I'm expecting calls or texts (I have the phone on vibrate), but just in case there was an emergency. It would be doubly so if I was in a foreign country. I'm :eek: that so many people here say they turn their phones off at night. You just better hope that none of you come before me when I'm on a jury. :EVILLE:

I don't turn my phone off - it is on 24 hours. Not that I always hear it, because it is usually charging in the living room and I am sleeping in my bedroom. We still have a landline, but when we give it up, I will move the phone charger to my bedroom and have it there.

And Brian - I know I have said it before, but Fred and Poths come from a different news story take than the US. Personally, I don't know whether or not I believe Amanda is innocent or guilty, but I do know that people experience media coverage differently depending upon their country's reporting.

But I do believe that if Amanda hadn't been the girl from a nice neighborhood and family that could afford to push it to the media, the story would never have made it to the national/international news front. I can't begin to imagine how many different "amandas" are out there, no matter their nationality.

cruisin
10-06-2011, 04:26 AM
I thought all smart phones were made that way these days and that most people have smart phone. Is that not true?

I have a Motorola Droid, I can turn it off easily. Not accidentally, but easily.


But the incident happened in 2007, in Italy. Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito were college students who presumably were living on comparatively limited budgets, and all the news reports refer to "cell phones" without giving any indication that they were "smart phones." I wouldn't assume that they had smart phones.

And, as far as Amanda, if she went through a study abroad program (like my son did), they probably provided a cell phone. The phones they are given are so basic, I don't even think you can text on them (at least back then).

gladiatorqueen
10-06-2011, 04:58 AM
I am not sure if this article has been posted yet but it's worth a read. Douglas Preston wrote a book on the Monster of Florence and the Giuliano Mignini (who went after Knox is a nutter if you as me). I read his book on the Monster of Florence and would highly recommend it.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/04/knox-acquittal-only-possible-verdict

galaxygirl
10-06-2011, 05:09 AM
I have a Motorola Droid, I can turn it off easily. Not accidentally, but easily.

I have a Thunderbolt and it's pretty easy to turn off also.

kia_4EverOnIce
10-06-2011, 11:06 AM
I think it's more in Berlusphony's Berlusconi's interest to defend the apparatus of the state than to cozy up to the U.S. But I'm a foreigner and do not claim to be intimately familiar with his philosophy of government (such as it is). If you think he's more interested in foreign than domestic opinion, I'd love to hear why.

Berlusconi has had and still has a lot of trials going on in Italy. It's years he's trying to pass a law that "protect" the Prime Minister from being persecuted, just yesterday there was a first vote for a law against interceptions (against which also Italian Wikipedia is on strike, covering all the entries). In a few words, he's in constant war with Italian justice and Juries.
Also after this last sentence in Knox's case, the ex-Justice minister (he left justice to become secretary of Berlusconi's party) attacked the prosecutors, saying that it's not fair they never pay for their mistakes.
Satyrical sentences going around sounds like "PMs were wrong on Amanda, so politics want to prove that they are wrong also about themselves".
Sadly, it's Berlusconi interest to go against the jury now.

On the other hand, also Berlusconi is philo-US, he pretended (don't know if it's true) to be close to Bush, and though now he's not so close to Obama, he still his philo-US, so that's a second reason why he surely wouldn't have been to pleased to sadden US (for example, on another topic, especially after the new wikileaks files, I have would expected politics to protest against the trial of Ashby in the US and pretend some form of repayment).

allezfred
10-06-2011, 11:08 AM
I think it's more in Berlusphony's Berlusconi's interest to defend the apparatus of the state than to cozy up to the U.S. But I'm a foreigner and do not claim to be intimately familiar with his philosophy of government (such as it is). If you think he's more interested in foreign than domestic opinion, I'd love to hear why.

I've no idea why you're bringing Berlusconi into this at all. It seems totally irrelevant.

Unless he invited Amanda Knox to one of his bunga-bunga parties.

cruisin
10-06-2011, 02:00 PM
I am not sure if this article has been posted yet but it's worth a read. Douglas Preston wrote a book on the Monster of Florence and the Giuliano Mignini (who went after Knox is a nutter if you as me). I read his book on the Monster of Florence and would highly recommend it.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/04/knox-acquittal-only-possible-verdict

Mignini would have fit nicely into the court of 1692 Salem, MA.

Skittl1321
10-06-2011, 02:26 PM
There is a way to actually turn it off (short of running out of battery power) but it involves holding down a certain button and you have to know about it.

I thought all smart phones were made that way these days and that most people have smart phone. Is that not true?

I have an Android Incredible, and to turn it off, I do have to hold down a button that I 'have to know about', but um- isn't every electronic like that? I mean, you have to know where the button is to turn off a TV, an iron, a computer. What can you turn off without knowing where the button is? I use this particular button in meetings and movies, as I actually turn off my phone, not just put it into airplane mode.

I do not turn my smart phone off at night, because I have it programed to not download email between 9 and 6, and not make noise for any other notification, without me having to manually do that each night. But with my stupid cell phone in college, I always turned it off at night. It saved the battery, rather than just turning off the ringer. As others pointed out, this happened years ago, so smart phones were less common.

Jackie Sparrow
10-06-2011, 02:56 PM
From what I recall, Amanda was basically convicted for being a nasty American bitch. Not because there was any evidence she murdered anyone. This whole attack played out in the trial and heavily in the media. The jurors were never sequestered so they were able to watch the news and were fed all this vicious stuff about Knox. It seriously makes me never want to go to Italy, just in case...
Where are you from again?

elbeep
10-06-2011, 03:41 PM
Mignini would have fit nicely into the court of 1692 Salem, MA.
Good book, Fatal Gift of Beauty, by Nina Burleigh gives some background into where Mignini may have been coming from. This book is not so much about the Perugia crime itself but about the personalities of the participants and the cities and cultures from which they came. It's a very interesting analysis.

Vagabond
10-06-2011, 03:44 PM
I've no idea why you're bringing Berlusconi into this at all. It seems totally irrelevant.

My original comment (#256) was about the way the Italian media (which are largely owned by the government and/or Berlusconi-dominated interests) covered the case. kia_4EverOnIce, who is Italian, asked me a question specifically about Berlusconi, so I replied.