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Rex
09-29-2011, 04:41 PM
This should be the latest edition:
http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Chef-Culinary-Institute-America/dp/0470421355/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317310210&sr=8-1

This is an older edition that's cheaper:
http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Chef-Culinary-Institute-America/dp/0764557343/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1317310210&sr=8-2

Thanks for finding this.
I took a look inside, and automatically found a recipe for Thousand Island Dressing. :)

peibeck
09-29-2011, 04:52 PM
I buy one or two cookbooks a year, and sometimes I get some as gifts. I mainly use them for baking recipes, rather than dinner meals, which I tend to just wing. And I inherited quite a few cookbooks from my mom.

I currently also get Taste of Home magazine. I got the whole years subscription for only $2. I haven't made any recipes from it yet, but I do at least read the issues. :shuffle:

Norlite
09-29-2011, 05:12 PM
I use to buy one or two a year, but haven't bought any in years. Work, kids and a too hectic household happened and dampened my interest in trying anything more complicated than throwing together a roast, potatoes and a salad for any meal. :shuffle: they sit on a shelf in my kitchen hutch unopened now. But I have just began to have an interest in cooking again, now that my life has slowed down a tiny bit, but I'm more inclined to search online or check out apps on my ipad.

My most valuable baking cookbook is my mother's binder with her hand written, wonderfully amazing recipes.

Habs
09-29-2011, 05:17 PM
My most valuable baking cookbook is my mother's binder with her hand written, wonderfully amazing recipes.

I have one of these from my dear grandmother, who died eight years ago. I found a plain, spiral notebook in a drawer at my mom's only a year or so ago... I didn't know what it was, opened it and it contained dozens of my grandma's favourite, hand-written recipes. It's a treasure - my mom let me have it.

Back to the original question, I LOVE cookbooks. I buy them all the time, for myself and as for gifts. I tend to go back to my favourites often, but it's not unusual for Mr. Habs and I to go through them on a weekend afternoon, pick out new recipes and make a grocery list. :D

myhoneyhoney
09-29-2011, 05:25 PM
I used to buy cookbooks once in a while but I usually only liked maybe 2-3 recipes in the book which was disappointing. Now I like to use online recipe sites so I can read the reviews of each recipe. Often there's suggested modifications that tweak the recipe to make them even better.

KCC
09-29-2011, 05:50 PM
Just started a very low sodium diet (less than 1000 mg per day, required for DH), and bought a few new cookbooks. Like any cookbook, some recipes were good, and some not worth the effort. This is a lot harder than I expected, since now most everything needs to be made from scratch. Tried making baked beans last night, and an entire day's effort turned out mediocre. Same with my substitute for A1 steaksauce. My BBQ sauce, however, is yummy. I ordered a Viking stand mixer (because I had an urge to splurge after spending hours in grocery stores and with my nose in cookbooks) and cannot wait to try baking my own salt-free bread. Any good salt-free recipes would be welcomed!

rfisher
09-29-2011, 06:35 PM
BTW, don't let a "Themed" cookbook deter you. Mario Batali authored this cookbook http://www.amazon.com/Mario-Tailgates-NASCAR-Style-Batali/dp/0892048468/ref=sr_1_11?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1317267568&sr=1-11 which has a NASCAR theme to it. Don't let that turn you off. This is a great little grilling cookbook with a ton of good recipes.

I have that. It's great.

Lacey
09-29-2011, 07:03 PM
Having whittled down my cookbook collection as per above, my new cooking bible is America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook, very clear and concise fabulous recipes (much better than Joy of Cooking) and I adore these two latest from (don't snark) Martha Stewart: Great Food Fast and Fresh Flavor Fast, I'm all in favor of fast, and these are both full of intriguing recipes, one recipe per page with an accompanying photo opposite, love the organization and style.

Jenny
09-29-2011, 07:09 PM
I would never snark owning a Martha book - like her persona or not, the woman knows what she's doing in the kitchen. I have several of her books, and we count several of her recipes among those we have in high rotation. Her recipes can be quite complicated and include hard to find or expensive ingredients (chile con queso made with manchego cheese? seriously?), but she also does a good job with easy, every day recipes that work every time.

Dragonlady
09-29-2011, 07:13 PM
I am a cookbook junkie. I love great cookbooks and I'm always looking for new ones to add to the collection. I admit that some are purchasing errors but there are others I've had for years with spattered pages and broken spines held together with duct tape.

skatingfan5
09-29-2011, 07:30 PM
Having whittled down my cookbook collection as per above, my new cooking bible is America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook, very clear and concise fabulous recipes (much better than Joy of Cooking)Much better than the Joy of Cooking? Hmph! I'll bet it doesn't show you how to skin a squirrel (http://www.oneforthetable.com/oftt/images/stories/articles/joy_of_cooking3.jpg). :P :eek: :yikes: :scream: :lol:

Aceon6
09-29-2011, 08:50 PM
Speaking of skinning. I have my mother's original Betty Crocker. No better source for "from scratch" when everything was from scratch. No assumption that your chicken came without feathers!

overedge
09-29-2011, 10:18 PM
I would never snark owning a Martha book - like her persona or not, the woman knows what she's doing in the kitchen.

I think you meant to type "Her assistants know what they are doing in the kitchen and she knows how to slap her name on it" :P

And then there's this (scroll down to the last of the three stories):
http://www.npr.org/2011/06/11/137114769/bluff-the-listener

Japanfan
09-29-2011, 10:25 PM
This is a lot harder than I expected, since now most everything needs to be made from scratch. Tried making baked beans last night, and an entire day's effort turned out mediocre. Same with my substitute for A1 steaksauce. My BBQ sauce, however, is yummy. I ordered a Viking stand mixer (because I had an urge to splurge after spending hours in grocery stores and with my nose in cookbooks) and cannot wait to try baking my own salt-free bread. Any good salt-free recipes would be welcomed!

What a challenge!! It would be hard to make good salt-free baked beans I would think because the salt is part of what makes them so tasty. They are commonly made with pork hocks, which are really salty.

BrokenAnkle
09-29-2011, 10:29 PM
I still buy them even though we use Epicurious and so forth more often.

I do like to cook and bake, but I also love the old ones by Peg Bracken, like The I Hate to Cook Book. The recipes are very old fashioned and use canned soup and stuff in almost every recipe, but her writing is still very funny after all these decades .