PDA

View Full Version : Do you buy cookbooks? Often or rarely?



Pages : 1 [2] 3 4 5 6

Nan
09-28-2011, 08:15 PM
I buy one a year because there is always a request on at least one of my daughters Christmas lists. They all like to venture out in the kitchen and like to try new foods and recipes.

(I really murdered the plural and possessive in that first sentence, didn't I?)

timing
09-28-2011, 08:24 PM
We both buy cookbooks and get recipes from the internet. With a vegetarian daughter on a gluten-free diet, I need all the ideas I can get.

Finnice
09-28-2011, 08:28 PM
I love cookbooks and buy about 7 per year. I read them a lot and then use them to base my own recipes. I cook nearly every day.

emason
09-28-2011, 09:05 PM
All the time - my collection just keeps growing. I read them just for the knowledge in them, the explanations of the why of things that I don't seem to get elsewhere. (For example, I could never understand why recipes for orange cake always call for lemon juice. Then I found the answer in a cookbook; orange is a volatile flavor that dissipates easily, but the addition of lemon juice helps counteract that.)

kwanfan1818
09-28-2011, 09:13 PM
When you win Lotto, you might want to get this:

http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Cuisine-Art-Science-Cooking/dp/0982761007

I read an article about this book in "The New Yorker", and there is a chapter about food pathogens with full frontal photos that sounds :scream:

genevieve
09-28-2011, 10:29 PM
I love cookbooks :swoon:

But I'm choosy...I unloaded a lot of gift cookbooks at a yard sale this year, because I never even opened them. I have Julia Child and the 75th anniversary Joy of Cooking, but overall I like cookbooks that focus on either a particular cuisine or a particular style of cooking, and celebrity chefs are a turnoff for me.

I do get a lot of recipies from the internet when I'm trying something new or on impulse, but I also like to consult my cookbooks, and if I like the experiment I've tried, I will look for a cookbook that will give me more.

I also looooove buying old cookbooks. My former boss gave me a Hershey's chocolate baking cookbook from I think the 1940s and it's a fascinating glimpse into the baking styles of the day. I also have a cheesecake book (I love baking, so I have a lot of baking books) from the '70s that is full of great humor and design.

skatingfan5
09-28-2011, 11:08 PM
I love cookbooks :swoon:

But I'm choosy...I unloaded a lot of gift cookbooks at a yard sale this year, because I never even opened them. I have Julia Child and the 75th anniversary Joy of Cooking, but overall I like cookbooks that focus on either a particular cuisine or a particular style of cooking, and celebrity chefs are a turnoff for me.

I also looooove buying old cookbooks. My former boss gave me a Hershey's chocolate baking cookbook from I think the 1940s and it's a fascinating glimpse into the baking styles of the day. I, too, love cookbooks, even though in the past 10 years I don't think I've cooked more than a handful of meals. :shuffle: But I do like to read cookbooks -- the ones that have more than just recipes in them are fascinating. I have a lot of older ones, including some from the early 1900's and many pamphlets put out by various companies (food and appliance) in the 1930's and 1940's. Some others are a trip down memory lane, as I remember looking through the ones my grandmother and mother used when I was in grade school.

I have both Julia and Joy ... unfortunately my Joy of Cooking was very well used for a certain few recipes -- the spine broke and it now automatically opens to "Brownies Cockaigne (http://freeingmymartha.blogspot.com/2010/03/my-favorite-brownies.html)". :o I regularly used the excuse that I didn't have the right size baking pan and would double the recipe and then eat about 1/3 of the batter. :slinkaway

Sassafras
09-28-2011, 11:09 PM
I hardly cook anymore. When I need a recipe, I do an online search.

Artemis@BC
09-28-2011, 11:36 PM
I love cookbooks too ... but very rarely buy them any more. I have one shelf dedicated to cookbooks, and if I want any more I'd have to get rid of some others ... and I've already "perfected" my collection.

Part of it is being vegetarian. I see no point in acquiring a book that contains a lot of recipes I'll never use.

But mostly I'm just trying to limit my book acquisions, period. Just as I use the library for the novels I read, if a new & interesting cookbook comes out I'll get it from the library and then photocopy the handful of recipes that I might actually use.

Plus of course there's an almost limitless availability of recipes online.

Artemis@BC
09-28-2011, 11:39 PM
I have both Julia and Joy ... unfortunately my Joy of Cooking was very well used for a certain few recipes -- the spine broke and it now automatically opens to "Brownies Cockaigne (http://freeingmymartha.blogspot.com/2010/03/my-favorite-brownies.html)". :o I regularly used the excuse that I didn't have the right size baking pan and would double the recipe and then eat about 1/3 of the batter. :slinkaway

LOL! I use my Joy of Cooking more as a reference (how too for seldom used techniques) than as an actual recipe book ... but that Brownies Cockaigne is my favourite brownie recipe too. Sometimes simple is best.

AliasJohnDoe
09-28-2011, 11:47 PM
My grandmother passed down some of her cookbooks from the 40's, 50's and 60's.

Some really good old-fashioned Dutch, Welsh, German and Polish recipes. I like the old cook books.

Parsley Sage
09-28-2011, 11:52 PM
I buy maybe one or two a year. I have over 30 of them in my collection. There are a few that I use regularly and many that I consult when I'm cooking something.

Most of my recipes are from friends or the internet though.

genevieve
09-29-2011, 12:05 AM
... unfortunately my Joy of Cooking was very well used for a certain few recipes -- the spine broke and it now automatically opens to "Brownies Cockaigne (http://freeingmymartha.blogspot.com/2010/03/my-favorite-brownies.html)". :o I regularly used the excuse that I didn't have the right size baking pan and would double the recipe and then eat about 1/3 of the batter. :slinkaway
:lol:

My Moosewood cookbook is not hardbound, and the spine cracked years ago - there are whole sections of it not even attached any more, I just close them into the book as if they are. It opens automatically to the spinach-rice casserole. I could buy a new one, but I have written in a bunch of modifications and taped in a few other recipes too. In fact, one year I bought a copy of the book for a friend who raved about some of the dishes I made from it and I wrote in all my modifications for her (in nicer handwriting than in my copy!).

skatingfan5
09-29-2011, 12:18 AM
:lol:

My Moosewood cookbook is not hardbound, and the spine cracked years ago - there are whole sections of it not even attached any more, I just close them into the book as if they are. It opens automatically to the spinach-rice casserole. I could buy a new one, but I have written in a bunch of modifications and taped in a few other recipes too. In fact, one year I bought a copy of the book for a friend who raved about some of the dishes I made from it and I wrote in all my modifications for her (in nicer handwriting than in my copy!).Yes, my Joy of Cooking isn't hardbound, either. And when it opens to the Brownies Cockaigne, that page is completely separated from the rest (and bears the marks of chocolate and butter). :lol: There was a recipe in one of my old cookbooks (it may have been the original NYTimes Natural Foods Cookbook) for a spinach and brown rice casserole (with cheese and eggs) that I loved. I haven't made it in years -- I may have to go look it up tonight.

Garden Kitty
09-29-2011, 12:47 AM
I used to have a friend who collected cook books, so I got a number for her as gifts. I've bought some for myself over the years, but then I realized I never cook. I'll still get some "local cookbooks" for people as gifts when I travel.