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View Full Version : Should it be illegal to stink and not wear deodorant @ gym?



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modern_muslimah
09-30-2011, 08:56 PM
I'll admit that I never, ever put on deodorant. I don't think I smell. At least no one has told me directly yet :lol:

I have another family member who can go days without deodorant and smell fine. I only know because she told me. I'm not sure what the context of that conversation was but at least it taught me that not everyone needs deodorant.

FigureSpins
09-30-2011, 10:19 PM
There are natural alternatives to manufactured deodorants, including bathing, rubbing alcohol, baking soda, cornstarch and milk of magnesia if it's a concern about chemicals. Some people think they are odor-free when in fact, they aren't. Sometimes, it's caused by densitivity (being stuck in an apartment with the stench around you makes it seem normal) or aging/illness. At given times, hormones wreak havoc on tried-and-true products, it sometimes helps more to switch to an aerosol for a short time if you normally use a solid because the alcohol kills bacteria. (I know the label says it's okay for the environment, but I hate using them.)

You ain't smelled nothing until you walk into the rink after a morning of hockey practice, especially if it's the adult leagues. It's not just the athletes and sweat: they reek because they don't clean/deodorize their equipment or wash their uniforms. The stench starts when they open their bags, which haven't been ventilated since their last use. The whole rink stinks for a good hour or two after they leave. I think that's the leading reason to have them gear up in the locker rooms. *shudders*

agalisgv
09-30-2011, 11:01 PM
A bit of cultural lore, but I've often heard one of the reasons the US is so cleanliness conscious is bc of the influence of Native peoples. Traditionally many Native nations bathed daily no matter the weather. Since back in the day there weren't bathrooms, this meant walking through the snow to a lake or river, breaking apart the ice, and fully bathing in the freezing cold water. Even little children did this. Supposedly this was what helped develop strong immune systems (things like colds were very unusual).

Some elders say that's why the US is generally more hygienic--non-Indians picked up on the hygiene practices of Native folk and began bathing everyday no matter what. Other western countries later adjusted their hygiene practices, but not to the extent of the US.

Anyhow, it's always a big shock when Native folk travel to Europe--the hygiene expectations are very different over there. So when Native folk talk about cultural stinkiness, it's often white folk they are referring to. That said, I think I've heard virtually every immigrant group described as having odor problems (Europeans, East Indians, Africans, Middle Easteners, East Asians, etc).

PrincessLeppard
09-30-2011, 11:07 PM
The English department, among others, is full of crunchy granola types, but if they smell at all, it's usually of either perfume or, faintly, of the sour-mildewy smell of unwashed laundry. Some of us tend to be rather scattered and not terribly focused on the practical :shuffle:.

One can be scattered (don't look at my desk :yikes: ) and impractical, but that's not an excuse to be stinky or dress poorly. :drama:

I'm going to have to stage some sort of English teacher intervention. Though I will say that, overall, my department is much less tragic than many others I've witnessed. :scream:

;)

MacMadame
10-01-2011, 12:21 AM
Um, aside from one philosophy professor who apparently doesn't believe in bathing, they are all math and engineering professors who are more of the pocket-protector type than the crunchy granola type.
Oh, Nerd Smell. I am very experienced with that due to my profession. :lol:

Japanfan
10-01-2011, 12:39 AM
How do we separate culture and race?

Literally speaking, race is a biological/physical condition and culture is social/spiritual practices and traditions, etc. There could be different cultures within the same race.

However, so far as I know biological anthropologists and scientists have pretty much discredited the division of the human species into separate races. The reason is because the differences between major human groups (i.e. blacks, whites, Jews) are not significant enough to constitute separate races.

Ethnicity has pretty much replaced race. I suppose one might also use 'breeds' but there are less differences in types of peoples than there are in some species divided by breeds (i.e. dogs). However, we most commonly use 'breed' in a smaller or individual context.

my little pony
10-01-2011, 01:32 AM
I think people tend to use the word deodorant when they really mean anti perspirant. While deodorants may not work so well, I think anti perspirants work for most people.

kudos to the Native Americans for encouraging good hygiene

MacMadame
10-01-2011, 01:48 AM
I think people tend to use the word deodorant when they really mean anti perspirant. While deodorants may not work so well, I think anti perspirants work for most people.

Antiperspirants block sweating by blocking the pores. If the odor is caused by sweat, then the odor doesn't happen because the sweat doesn't happen. Deodorants combat odor by combating the bacteria that causes odor. If the odor is not really sweat-based, then deodorants are better but deodorants can work for sweat-based odors too.

So it's like ibuprofen vs. acetaminophen ... the one that works the best depends. Also some people think deodorant is healthier because it doesn't block the pores but I don't think the evidence is conclusive on that one.

Rex
10-01-2011, 01:53 AM
A bit of cultural lore, but I've often heard one of the reasons the US is so cleanliness conscious is bc of the influence of Native peoples. Traditionally many Native nations bathed daily no matter the weather. Since back in the day there weren't bathrooms, this meant walking through the snow to a lake or river, breaking apart the ice, and fully bathing in the freezing cold water. Even little children did this. Supposedly this was what helped develop strong immune systems (things like colds were very unusual).

Some elders say that's why the US is generally more hygienic--non-Indians picked up on the hygiene practices of Native folk and began bathing everyday no matter what. Other western countries later adjusted their hygiene practices, but not to the extent of the US.

Anyhow, it's always a big shock when Native folk travel to Europe--the hygiene expectations are very different over there. So when Native folk talk about cultural stinkiness, it's often white folk they are referring to. That said, I think I've heard virtually every immigrant group described as having odor problems (Europeans, East Indians, Africans, Middle Easteners, East Asians, etc).
I did not know that, agalisgv. We learn something new every day.

kwanfan1818
10-01-2011, 01:54 AM
Oh, Nerd Smell. I am very experienced with that due to my profession. :lol:

I remember a Doonesbury story arc where Alex's roommate at MIT, drew, advocated hygiene as a public service.

Prancer
10-01-2011, 02:47 AM
One can be scattered (don't look at my desk :yikes: ) and impractical, but that's not an excuse to be stinky or dress poorly. :drama:

As I tell my students when they complain about their flaky English teachers, at least we all bathe every day, which is more than can be said for some of our more linear-thinking colleagues. But there are a couple of people in the department who seem to have real problems keeping up with the laundry.


Oh, Nerd Smell. I am very experienced with that due to my profession. :lol:

I am sure you are, because my husband has worked with some of the least hygienic people I have ever seen. :yikes: Not all of them, mind you, or even most of them, but the ones who have issues with things like bathing and doing laundry REALLY stand out from the herd.

Lainerb
10-01-2011, 03:43 AM
A bit of cultural lore, but I've often heard one of the reasons the US is so cleanliness conscious is bc of the influence of Native peoples. Traditionally many Native nations bathed daily no matter the weather. Since back in the day there weren't bathrooms, this meant walking through the snow to a lake or river, breaking apart the ice, and fully bathing in the freezing cold water. Even little children did this. Supposedly this was what helped develop strong immune systems (things like colds were very unusual).

Some elders say that's why the US is generally more hygienic--non-Indians picked up on the hygiene practices of Native folk and began bathing everyday no matter what. Other western countries later adjusted their hygiene practices, but not to the extent of the US.

Anyhow, it's always a big shock when Native folk travel to Europe--the hygiene expectations are very different over there. So when Native folk talk about cultural stinkiness, it's often white folk they are referring to. That said, I think I've heard virtually every immigrant group described as having odor problems (Europeans, East Indians, Africans, Middle Easteners, East Asians, etc).

Well, Tlingit men would bathe everyday in the ocean water regardless of whether it was spring, summer, winter or fall. Anyway, I am not sure if that improved the smell of all the fish grease that was once applied liberally to our hair or not.:shuffle:

triple_toe
10-01-2011, 03:45 AM
People often tell me I smell good and I hardly ever use antiperspirant :shuffle:. I'm not a very sweaty person so I find I'm good with just showering and using scent on my neck or wrists. Plus it's next to impossible to find scent-free deodorants. I bought one a little while ago that was supposed to be "powder fresh" and I was hyper aware of smelling like baby powder ALL DAY. Talk about gross :yikes:

Cyn
10-01-2011, 08:30 AM
The English department, among others, is full of crunchy granola types, but if they smell at all, it's usually of either perfume or, faintly, of the sour-mildewy smell of unwashed laundry. Some of us tend to be rather scattered and not terribly focused on the practical :shuffle:.

Back in the Dark Ages when I was in school, if the English Department faculty (many of whom were the aforementioned crunchy granola Birkenstock variety) had any issues w/ BO, it was undetectable as it was eclipsed by the overpowering, clinging :scream: "fragrance" (sarcasm) from cigarettes. Every desk in there, it seemed, always had an ashtray overflowing with butts, many of which had been half-smoked and then left to burn themselves out (hopefully without catching the other eleventy butts/filters previously abandoned). Smoking was still allowed in the buildings back then, and the Eng. Dept. always had a San Francisco Fog-like effect of cigarette smoke :scream:. It was so bad that even though I was also a smoker, if I had to meet with a Prof., even for 5 minutes, I couldn't wait to get home, shower, and change clothes to get rid of the cigarette funk.

In the winter, I don't *have* to use deodorant every day unless I've done something to work up a good "glow" :P (though I usually apply it anyway out of habit). In the scorching, Deep South summers, though? :yikes: Forget about it….Five minutes after drying off from a shower, sweat starts collecting in my cleavage and the band area of my bra, the back of my neck, behind the knees, etc. :wall: .

marbri
10-01-2011, 02:13 PM
A bit of cultural lore, but I've often heard one of the reasons the US is so cleanliness conscious is bc of the influence of Native peoples. Traditionally many Native nations bathed daily no matter the weather. Since back in the day there weren't bathrooms, this meant walking through the snow to a lake or river, breaking apart the ice, and fully bathing in the freezing cold water. Even little children did this. Supposedly this was what helped develop strong immune systems (things like colds were very unusual).

Some elders say that's why the US is generally more hygienic--non-Indians picked up on the hygiene practices of Native folk and began bathing everyday no matter what. Other western countries later adjusted their hygiene practices, but not to the extent of the US.

Anyhow, it's always a big shock when Native folk travel to Europe--the hygiene expectations are very different over there. So when Native folk talk about cultural stinkiness, it's often white folk they are referring to. That said, I think I've heard virtually every immigrant group described as having odor problems (Europeans, East Indians, Africans, Middle Easteners, East Asians, etc).

This reminds me of a conversation I had years ago with a good friend from New Zealand who did a trek through Africa. She was told along the journey that many Africans found the odour of whites unpleasant. Something to do with all the dairy they consume. It was an eye opener for her because we never think we smell offensively, we always think it's the others ;) Diet plays a huge role in the scent we give off.

It's something that stuck with me all these years and whenever I am going on a long haul flight (because no matter how much deodorant you put on you are never fresh by the end of those). I stick to water, fruit and veggies the few days leading up to it. No curries, garlic, cheese etc..