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oleada
02-01-2012, 03:19 AM
Not directly related to your websites, but I can't believe some makeup company is actually selling colors using Capital/Effie as a tagline. PRwise, I guess it makes sense, but it kind of missing the point of the book, where the Capital is a horrible, corrupt govt, and the extreme stylists are just one of the symptoms.

Don't judge, but I'm totally buying half of those nail polish colors :slinkaway:

IceAlisa
02-02-2012, 07:23 AM
What do you all think about Joan Didion? Particularly, her fiction? I read an interesting article (http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/01/the-autumn-of-joan-didion/8851/) about her and was intrigued. However, if she really does write about yards of yellow silk on her windows, I wonder (and doubt) if that's someone whose writing I would enjoy. That sounded a bit off-putting to me.

Thoughts?

Also, what do people think about Atwood's Oryx and Crake? Saw someone reading it the other day and realized I haven't yet checked out this particular Atwood.

aliceanne
02-02-2012, 05:16 PM
What do you all think about Joan Didion? Particularly, her fiction? I read an interesting article (http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/01/the-autumn-of-joan-didion/8851/) about her and was intrigued. However, if she really does write about yards of yellow silk on her windows, I wonder (and doubt) if that's someone whose writing I would enjoy. That sounded a bit off-putting to me.

Thoughts?

Also, what do people think about Atwood's Oryx and Crake? Saw someone reading it the other day and realized I haven't yet checked out this particular Atwood.

I used to read all Joan Dideon's books during the 70's and 80's. I didn't find her shallow. She reflects on her life and relates it to the political/social issues of the day. Her style is very readable.

She is writing from the viewpoint of a successful Southern California hippie-ish writer however.

RobbieB
02-02-2012, 06:06 PM
Just finished Beowulf last night. Thought I read some of the "classics" this year. Anyone got a favorite one? Need some suggestions before I head to the library...


---
R. Bryant
http://www.trailways.com/team-trailways/motorcoach-listing-companies/companies/silverstate-nv

aliceanne
02-02-2012, 06:23 PM
Just finished Beowulf last night. Thought I read some of the "classics" this year. Anyone got a favorite one? Need some suggestions before I head to the library...


---
R. Bryant
http://www.trailways.com/team-trailways/motorcoach-listing-companies/companies/silverstate-nv

"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas. Romance, adventure, suspense, all by an author your English teacher would approve of. I liked the book better than any of the movies.

Prancer
02-02-2012, 06:33 PM
What do you all think about Joan Didion? Particularly, her fiction? I read an interesting article (http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/01/the-autumn-of-joan-didion/8851/) about her and was intrigued. However, if she really does write about yards of yellow silk on her windows, I wonder (and doubt) if that's someone whose writing I would enjoy. That sounded a bit off-putting to me.

I like Joan Didion's writing quite a bit, although I usually come across a book and think "Oh, Didion. I should probably read this" more than "I must read Didion's newest book the second it comes out."

The Year of Magical Thinking, which is about her wretched year of grieving after her husband died, is one someone in your field might find interesting. Her daughter was in a serious medical crisis at the time Didion's husband died, and so she was caring for her daughter while mourning. She writes about her grieving process as if she's observing it more than experiencing, which is odd at first but effective in many ways, and she reflects on medicine and human health, among other things, throughout the book.

pair mom
02-02-2012, 06:40 PM
"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas. Romance, adventure, suspense, all by an author your English teacher would approve of. I liked the book better than any of the movies.

I am also determined to "up" my classics quotient this year...am currently wading through The Scarlett Letter and have uploaded onto my ereader The Count of Monte Cristo, Tale of Two Cities, Little Women and Jane Eyre!

Dumped Franzen's "Freedom" after third time attempting it (this time got 1/3 the way through and still not engaged!)....my opinion...don't listen to Oprah's recommends! When will I ever learn!;)

Erin
02-02-2012, 06:51 PM
Dumped Franzen's "Freedom" after third time attempting it (this time got 1/3 the way through and still not engaged!)....my opinion...don't listen to Oprah's recommends! When will I ever learn!;)

Interesting...I was thinking about reading Freedom after it was mentioned on an episode of Parks & Recreation, but not so sure now.

I'm not an Oprah fan, but some of her recommendations have turned out to be OK. I often loan books back and forth with my mom, who loves Oprah, so that's how I ended up reading some of them.

PrincessLeppard
02-02-2012, 06:54 PM
I am also determined to "up" my classics quotient this year...am currently wading through The Scarlett Letter)

I would never inflict this novel on my students.

"Wading" is correct. "Muddling" works as well.

I like the theme of the book, but Hawthorne's writing style drives me insane. And I had to read the book in high school, college and grad school. :scream:

PRlady
02-02-2012, 06:55 PM
help, fast. I am leaving in an hour, my Nook can't download books in israel, and I don't think I have enough to get me through. I've already done Goon Squad, Marriage Plot and Freedom in the last six weeks, plus Boomerang and Bonk. (there's a combination.) What good literary fiction am I missing that will keep me occupied on long plane rides?

Dave of the North
02-02-2012, 07:41 PM
My son gave me the 4 volume set "A Song of Ice and Fire" aka Game of Thrones by Georg R. R. Martin for Christmas, I've read them plus I bought & read the 5th one. And there's going to be two more...at the rate he's killing off the characters I'm not sure he will have anybody left by the end of the 7th book.:P Hope it doesn't take another 5 years for the next book to come out.

Prancer
02-02-2012, 07:53 PM
"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas. Romance, adventure, suspense, all by an author your English teacher would approve of. I liked the book better than any of the movies.

:shuffle: Define "English teacher."


I like the theme of the book, but Hawthorne's writing style drives me insane. And I had to read the book in high school, college and grad school. :scream:

I kinda like Hawthorne. :shuffle:

But I do try to avoid inflicting him on students.


help, fast. I am leaving in an hour, my Nook can't download books in israel, and I don't think I have enough to get me through. I've already done Goon Squad, Marriage Plot and Freedom in the last six weeks, plus Boomerang and Bonk. (there's a combination.) What good literary fiction am I missing that will keep me occupied on long plane rides?

What are your three favorite books?

aliceanne
02-02-2012, 09:00 PM
:shuffle: Define "English teacher."




When I was in high school that is what we called the teachers who made you read literature. I realize Dumas is French, but I didn't read it in French.

mkats
02-02-2012, 11:08 PM
I got my hands on a copy of "Elizabeth the Queen" yesterday. I got off work a little early so it was still light out when I got home - and it was so warm out that I thought it would be nice to air the house out a bit (our house is ancient and none of the windows open). So I just opened the front door all the way, plopped a chair in front, and sat there reading until it was too dark to see anymore :lol:

Prancer
02-02-2012, 11:16 PM
When I was in high school that is what we called the teachers who made you read literature. I realize Dumas is French, but I didn't read it in French.

Ah. Well, when I was taking lit classes, Dumas was considered pulpy pop fiction of the past--rather like Fenimore Cooper. No one considered either one literature and right off the top of my head, I can't think of any English teachers I know now who do, either.

Sometimes I have people try to impress me with their literary taste and Dumas is always one that comes up. It makes me smile. Not that there is anything at all wrong with Dumas--he's very entertaining. But that isn't a name I would trot out to impress.