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rfisher
01-26-2012, 08:17 PM
I would say when people go through traumatic experiences, it does change their personality. Essentially, in Mockingjay Katniss isn't the same person. She's broken. As someone said, you'd just have to imagine she was one gust of wind away from having a mental breakdown. The voice does change drastically in book 3, but it's warranted IMO.

Reading the book, I got the sense of a person who is completely worn down and is hanging on by a thread, but is expected (by a nation) to stand up and be strong in her convictions and purpose. Given the circumstances, I thought the personality shift was right on the money. I'd have been disappointed if she was the same throughout the books; where's the growth? The character progression? Where's the evidence of what she's been through? To survive and endure all of the terror, pain and loss she had to go through without it changing her...that wouldn't have been realistic. I appreciate that aspect of the book.

Do I like fragile I'm-gonna-crack-any-minute Katniss? Not particularly...but I understand why she was like that.

The problem is, her's wasn't the only voice that was different. The entire book just jarred. Harry certainly had a lot of trauma and stress placed on him throughout the series, but JKR's voice never changed even though Harry grew and matured. I'm not certain Collins ever had a plan for a 2nd or 3rd book and threw them together after the 1st was a commercial success. I had the feeling she didn't quite know what to do with the story or with the characters. I liked the first book, thought the 2nd was OK even if it was a rehash of the first, and thought the 3rd was weak and incoherent. But, that's just my opinion. :)

Artemis@BC
01-27-2012, 12:24 AM
... I'm not certain Collins ever had a plan for a 2nd or 3rd book and threw them together after the 1st was a commercial success. I had the feeling she didn't quite know what to do with the story or with the characters.

I'm fairly certain she had to have had at least an outline for books 2 and 3 when she wrote the first one. There's no way you can create such a completely unjust society like that and end it unresolved. (Well, not in YA lit anyway. You can if you're Margaret Atwood. ;) ) Katniss might have "won" the Games at the end of book 1, but it was a short-term win, and in no way altered the greater society or the fate of those she cared about. Prim might not have to worry about where her next meal is coming from, but she could still be reaped.

What I do think happened is that, in the wake of the success of book 1, the publisher put an enormous amount of pressure on her to complete the trilogy quickly and get the next 2 books out there asap.

RockTheTassel
01-27-2012, 01:52 AM
I haven't read the last book in the series, but the end of The Hunger Games seemed to suggest that there would be a sequel. I think Collins must have at least had some plans to write another book.

Marge_Simpson
01-27-2012, 06:29 PM
An interesting article from John Granger (aka the Hogwarts Professor, I am a huge fan of his) that was written right after "Mockingjay" was published. He points out that "Mockingjay" pretty much follows the same formula as the first 2 books:
http://www.hogwartsprofessor.com/mockingjay-discussion-14-the-hunger-games-formula/

PrincessLeppard
01-27-2012, 07:56 PM
Some good points, but I feel like some of them are a huge stretch. And, of course, I'm right. :P

I do agree with one of the comments that she didn't ever buy that Katniss was in love with either Gale or Peeta, but merely used whoever was there at the time. Which is probably why I hated the ending so much. To me, she didn't care about either of them enough to marry and reproduce with.

Marge_Simpson
01-27-2012, 08:28 PM
Well, I read a bit of the jacket blurb, and I saw "Lynley investigates with his friends Simon and Deborah." Great. :rolleyes: I don't mind Simon too much, but Deborah is my least favourite character in the books, and Simon and Deb together are usually quite painful to read. Plus no mention of Barbara (who is by far my favourit character and the main reason I continue to read these books). But then to book flipped open to a random page, and I did see Barbara there. So thank goodness for that.

Plus it's set in the Lakes District, one of my favourite parts of the country, so that's cool -- and means we might not have to see that new DCI she introduced last book. (Stay away from her Tommy! She's no good for you!)

Simon and Deborah are just SO annoying together. Barbara is my favorite character, and I also like Winston.
Maybe Ms. George can kill off Deborah in the next book. Lynley and Simon can both have breakdowns and share a room in the mental hospital. Then Barbara can be promoted and team up with Winston for the rest of the series. :lol:

Artemis@BC
01-27-2012, 09:28 PM
An interesting article from John Granger (aka the Hogwarts Professor, I am a huge fan of his) that was written right after "Mockingjay" was published. He points out that "Mockingjay" pretty much follows the same formula as the first 2 books:
http://www.hogwartsprofessor.com/mockingjay-discussion-14-the-hunger-games-formula/

Hmm. Interesting points, but I agree that many are stretched. And in particular full of inference -- what the reader wanted from the conclusion of the series rather than what the author actually delivered on the page.

The point I agree with the most is this:

"In fact, the critical things that happen before and in the Games and Quell arenas happen in Mockingjay‘s story line as well. She is telling us that this “real world” slaughter of innocents and the “artificial world” nightmare of children dying in the Capitol’s Hunger Games don’t differ except in our seeing one as acceptable and the other as unacceptable."

I too see Mockinjay as a logical conclusion to the story arc. And I think the cleverest part of the book was how the author used propaganda as a tool (and, as an educator, I see "teachable moment" all over the place here). But my quibble with book 3 is not its overall content, but the execution. Waaay too much exposition, contrived situations, character inconsistencies, and general writing sloppiness.

moojja
01-27-2012, 10:16 PM
I too see Mockinjay as a logical conclusion to the story arc. And I think the cleverest part of the book was how the author used propaganda as a tool (and, as an educator, I see "teachable moment" all over the place here). But my quibble with book 3 is not its overall content, but the execution. Waaay too much exposition, contrived situations, character inconsistencies, and general writing sloppiness.

That's the section that I love about Mockinjay. It wasn't just one sided, the propaganda was both faked and real materials. And how cleverly they set up the situations and used her as a tool.

I agree that she wasn't really in love with Peetra, it's just he's all she has left. Who/what else does else does he have too? It almost make sense for them to end-up together. On first read, I hated the ending, b/c I thought the ending was too rushed and too happy, but the more people talk about how the couple doesn't fit together, the more I like the ending. She said she choose sanity, in a way I think she choose to play out the semblance of a happy ending without really feeling it. But the ending is still too rushed. It should have ended with her committing suicide after she shot the leader of the 13th district.

Marge_Simpson
01-31-2012, 04:17 PM
Anyone wishing to emulate Effie Trinket's fashion sense should check out the Capital couture website:
http://capitolcouture.pn/
:lol:

PrincessLeppard
01-31-2012, 04:36 PM
I just finished Au Revoir Crazy European Chick which was definitely written with "This is gonna be an awesome movie!" in mind.

It was an okay read. I think it took me 90 minutes, and I would've liked to have had a bit more character development (especially of Crazy Euro Chick) but when one is looking for a movie deal, that probably isn't an over-riding concern.

moojja
01-31-2012, 04:41 PM
Anyone wishing to emulate Effie Trinket's fashion sense should check out the Capital couture website:
http://capitolcouture.pn/
:lol:

Not directly related to your websites, but I can't believe some makeup company is actually selling colors using Capital/Effie as a tagline. PRwise, I guess it makes sense, but it kind of missing the point of the book, where the Capital is a horrible, corrupt govt, and the extreme stylists are just one of the symptoms.

genevieve
01-31-2012, 04:58 PM
I started reading Conscience (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10417952-conscience) last night. Interesting so far - it's been a long time since I've read non-fiction other than trashy bios or ghost-written skater autobiographies :P

aliceanne
01-31-2012, 07:30 PM
I started reading Conscience (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10417952-conscience) last night. Interesting so far - it's been a long time since I've read non-fiction other than trashy bios or ghost-written skater autobiographies :P

Sounds good. Give us an update when you are further along.

I always wondered what it would be like to make that decision. I had a schoolmate who committed suicide rather than go to Vietnam.

Grannyfan
01-31-2012, 08:04 PM
Got a Kindle for Christmas, and Nightwoods by Charles Frazier was my first Kindle read. I was disappointed in it, but Cold Mountain is one of my favorite books, and I couldn't help comparing. On my Kindle now is something called Tropic of Night, which is very good so far. I'm also reading Lost in Shangri-la, a true WWII rescue story. I think I may have posted about it before.

modern_muslimah
01-31-2012, 10:14 PM
I started reading Jeffrey Eugenides' The Marriage Plot this weekend. I like it so far. I laugh and cringe at the characters, especially the protagonist, who take themselves so seriously and act so pretentiously while being a bit unlikable at the same time. Still, I can relate to them and I want them to find their way.