PDA

View Full Version : An FSU Without a Book Thread is Like an FS Event Without Snark



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 [53] 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

zaphyre14
01-12-2012, 01:28 PM
I finished "The Giver" in a traffic snarl this morning. Now I remember why I don't like Lois Lowry - very ambiguous ending and way too metaphysical for my taste.

I also finished the James Patterson book. It's not my favorite but it was a quick, easy read.

Now I'm into a Georgian mystery, "A Gilded Shroud" by Elizabeth Bailey. I picked it up at random at B&N and it's starting out better than I expected, with the murder of a Lady and the disappearance of her husband in the midden of the night. The investigators are the Lady's brother-in-law, who's mostly concerned with squashing the incipent scandal, and his mother's companion, an intelligent, observant widow who is determined to find out the truth.

I also have Elaine Viets' "Death on a Platter" waiting in the wings.

PrincessLeppard
01-12-2012, 01:50 PM
While sometimes ambiguous endings irk me, I did like the ending of The Giver. It's interesting to me how different students of mine interpret the ending.

Evilynn
01-12-2012, 03:19 PM
Finished the Gate to Women's Country (and there was a mysoginisty, polygamist cult that appeared at page 200, so it was even usable for the reading challenge. ;)), and liked it quite a bit. :) It felt very heavy handed in the beginning, but the end more or less made up for it.

Then I crammed in a re-read of Terry Pratchett's Guards! Guards! before starting on the first of the Hallow series by Kim Harrisson (I need a series with at least 3 books for the same challenge). So far it seems like a reasonably entertaining mindless read.

rfisher
01-13-2012, 02:46 PM
Savannah Blues by Mary Kay Andrews is making me laugh. I probably wouldn't enjoy it as much if reading, but I'm cracking up at the audio version in the car. There's a lot more romance than mystery (we have a dead body, but it's being ignored for the most part), but the Southern charm is funny.

Marge_Simpson
01-14-2012, 06:08 AM
I just finished "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children"
I usually love YA books, but I loathed this. I got the impression that the author started with the photos and tried to build a plot around them; I thought the end result was ridiculous. Thumbs down!

Prancer
01-14-2012, 08:46 PM
Savannah Blues by Mary Kay Andrews is making me laugh. I probably wouldn't enjoy it as much if reading, but I'm cracking up at the audio version in the car. There's a lot more romance than mystery (we have a dead body, but it's being ignored for the most part), but the Southern charm is funny.

I like Mary Kay Andrews--and Kathy Hogan Trochek, her alter ego who writes mysteries that are Southern but not humorous and light like the Andrews books. I think she's abandoned Callahan and Truman to focus on the light comedy books, though.

There's a sequel to Savannah Blues--Savannah Breeze. More of the same with a different setting.

rfisher
01-14-2012, 09:05 PM
I like Mary Kay Andrews--and Kathy Hogan Trochek, her alter ego who writes mysteries that are Southern but not humorous and light like the Andrews books. I think she's abandoned Callahan and Truman to focus on the light comedy books, though.

There's a sequel to Savannah Blues--Savannah Breeze. More of the same with a different setting.

I saw that on her website. The library had a couple more audio books by her which I'll get next.

I'm reading Gideon's Corpse; the 2nd Gideon Crew book by Doug Preston and Lincoln Child. Gideon is no Pendergast (but then there is no character like my beloved Aloysius) but it's OK. And, this one is about a radiation exposure. If there's enough I may add it to the extra credit list for my radiobiology course. I let them do an analysis of Jefferson Bass' Bones of Betrayal for what they got right and what they got wrong regarding radiation exposure.

Jefferson Bass is the psued of Jon Jefferson and George Bass. Dr. Bass is professor emeritus from the anthropology department at U of Tenn. He started the body farm and is the premier forensic anthropologist in the country. Their books are loosely based on some of his forensic cases. Bones of Betrayal is one of their better books. There is an excellent backstory on Oak Ridge during the 40s. We have spies and all sorts of good stuff. And, they only made a few glaring errors regarding radiation exposure.

skatesindreams
01-14-2012, 09:32 PM
I read somewhere that the average life expectancy in Haworth was 28, so the Brontes actually beat the odds somewhat. It tells you how self-absorbed the father was - I would have gotten the family out after the oldest 2 and the mother died in quick succession. The maternal grandparents were well-to-do merchants in Cornwall they could have gotten them out.

Fatalism and the "Will of God" were usual explanations for tragedies during this time.
The idea that there might have been other causes - such as tainted water - or the thought that they could have moved elsewhere probably wouldn't have even occurred to them.

IceAlisa
01-14-2012, 09:35 PM
Ugh, Shirley was a real trial of my patience. Charlotte Bronte must have thought pining is the new black. I promised myself that if Shirley was pining for unrequited love like Caroline, I would stop reading. At least Shirley had a pretty good reason for quietly freaking out

The chapter Louis Moore was another instance when I almost quit reading. Besides being maudlin and not a little S&M, I thought it was rather creepy that he went through Shirley's things. Not sure if the concept of privacy was the same then as it is now, but creepy!

I've come to a conclusion that today Charlotte would have at least experimented with alternative lifestyles. (http://www.psychosexual.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/Masochism_psychosexual_disorder.jpg). Her sister Emily, even more so.

Artistic Skaters
01-14-2012, 11:01 PM
I have been listening to Charlotte's Web read by E. B. White (one of my all time favorites) - I love this version & will have to own a copy so I can stop renewing this one at the the library.

Marge_Simpson
01-15-2012, 03:57 AM
I still have my hardcover copy of Charlotte's Web from when I was a kid, it was a Christmas gift from my godmother when I was about 6. The illustrations are so adorable.

oleada
01-15-2012, 04:45 AM
I finally finished The Shadow of the Wind in the plane to Chicago. I hit a lag halfway through, but I, overall, really liked it. The characters are very likeable and it was easy to get lost in. Yes, Spinner, I loved Nuria's letter and it was my favorite part of the book and I teared up at the end. Definitely my fave of the recs I've gotten from Spinner. A very good read :)

Next, I need something light...I think I want to read Good in Bed next - I liked it from a bit I read. But the internet in our hotel is awful :wall: Hopefully I can go to a Starbucks or something and download it.

Spinner
01-15-2012, 06:40 AM
I have been listening to Charlotte's Web read by E. B. White (one of my all time favorites) - I love this version & will have to own a copy so I can stop renewing this one at the the library.
I still have my very beaten up (read: well-loved ;) ) copy I got when I was in 1st or 2nd grade (30+ years ago!). This remains one of my top 5 favorite books ever and I make a point to read it once a year. :)

I finally finished The Shadow of the Wind in the plane to Chicago. I hit a lag halfway through, but I, overall, really liked it. The characters are very likeable and it was easy to get lost in. Yes, Spinner, I loved Nuria's letter and it was my favorite part of the book and I teared up at the end. Definitely my fave of the recs I've gotten from Spinner. A very good read :)
Glad you liked it! If you want more of the story, Angel's Game is sort of a prequel, but much MUCH darker. He also just released a sequel, The Prisoner of Heaven, in Spain and later this year in the UK. It continues the adventures of Daniel and Fermin. I can't wait to read it!

aftershocks
01-15-2012, 06:54 AM
I enjoy reading Kristin Hannah (On Mystic Lake, Angel Falls, The Things We Do for Love, Comfort and Joy, True Colors, Between Sisters) and Luanne Rice (Summer Light, Firefly Beach, True Blue, Home Fires, The Edge of Winter, What Matters Most).

IceAlisa
01-15-2012, 07:15 AM
I probably created the impression that I didn't like Shirley at all--I did, but what I liked was not the main story but rather the details. For instance, I thought the description of medical care rendered to Robert Moore was witty and still salient today. MacTurk is the surgeon.

He was one of those surgeons whom it was dangerous to vex: abrupt in his best moods, in his worst, savage. On seeing Moore's state, he relieved his feelings by a little flowery language, with which it is not necessary to strew the present page...

...Morning and evening MacTurk came to see him: his case, thus complicated by a new mischance, was become one of interest in the surgeon's eyes: he regarded him as a damaged piece of clock-work, which it would be creditable to his skill to set a-going again.

I know these surgeons! They still exist! They don't change! :lol:

And the character of young Martin Yorke was very interesting. In fact, I was interested in what happens to him more so than in the main characters.

There were some nice turns of phrase as well. However, the sentimentality, the protracted dialogues and monologues and :drama: wouldn't be missed if they were edited out. I now know what Bronte meant in her criticism of Austen and the thing Bronte despised, I happen to admire. She could use some of it herself.