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View Full Version : An FSU Without a Book Thread is Like an FS Event Without Snark



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Artemis@BC
01-10-2012, 05:36 PM
The Book Thief also took me a bit to get into. I felt very lost because it didn't have the typical layout of most books which are broken into chapters. I felt like I was lost and not sure how to read the story but you finally learn to just keep reading as if it is chapters. It was well worth it, one of my favorite books ever.

Thanks for the heads up. It's on my Kobo for my vacation starting later this week, so good to know.

aliceanne
01-10-2012, 06:23 PM
I'm reading Shakespeare Undead. He's a vampire. There are also zombies in it. So, really, it's the perfect book. :)

Well, so far, anyway. :P

As popular as vampires and zombies are with tweens, I'm surprised no one has done an Ice Princess/Vampire/Zombie story. Her ice dance partner could be a closet vampire, and her coach could be whatever creates zombies. Imagine finding out on the eve of her Olympic skate. Does she go through with it and risk becoming a vampire/zombie herself? Will she have to forfeit the gold because she is no longer human? Will the audience be shocked? Or will they complain that it is just more cheesy over-the-top melodrama?

Artemis@BC
01-10-2012, 07:32 PM
Speaking of 19th century women novelists and their relationships with their publishers ...

I caught the repeat broadcast of "Miss Austen Regrets" on PBS on Sunday. I found it interesting, and sad, how her brothers reacted when she said she wanted to try to get more money from her publisher for her books. They were fine when it was a hobby, an intellectual exercise -- but heaven forbid she should pursue writing as a profession!

aliceanne
01-10-2012, 08:02 PM
Speaking of 19th century women novelists and their relationships with their publishers ...

I caught the repeat broadcast of "Miss Austen Regrets" on PBS on Sunday. I found it interesting, and sad, how her brothers reacted when she said she wanted to try to get more money from her publisher for her books. They were fine when it was a hobby, an intellectual exercise -- but heaven forbid she should pursue writing as a profession!

I don't know who got all the money, but Charlotte Bronte was rock star famous after "Jane Eyre" was published, but her estate when she died was 1,000 pounds, which was pretty modest even by the standards of the day, and she was living in her father's rectory.

orientalplane
01-10-2012, 10:51 PM
I don't know who got all the money, but Charlotte Bronte was rock star famous after "Jane Eyre" was published, but her estate when she died was 1,000 pounds, which was pretty modest even by the standards of the day, and she was living in her father's rectory.

I'm sure you all know she was pregnant when she died. :(

IceAlisa
01-10-2012, 11:00 PM
I didn't know that. Who was the baby daddy?

orientalplane
01-10-2012, 11:03 PM
Her husband and father's curate, Arthur Bell Nicholls.

Wyliefan
01-10-2012, 11:22 PM
There were six Bronte siblings and they all died before they made it to their 40s . . . their father outlived them all. Can you imagine? I don't get the impression that he was the most lovable man on Earth, but I feel for him. :(

Nomad
01-11-2012, 01:05 AM
I don't know who got all the money, but Charlotte Bronte was rock star famous after "Jane Eyre" was published, but her estate when she died was 1,000 pounds, which was pretty modest even by the standards of the day, and she was living in her father's rectory.

The publisher, printers, libraries. and booksellers probably made more money than Charlotte. This was in the days before royalties - authors sold the copyright of their works to a publisher for a flat fee. The best they could hope for was a runaway bestseller that would enable them to charge a higher fee for any books that followed.

IceAlisa
01-11-2012, 01:07 AM
A little early Valentine for all the print lovers :):

What Books Get Up To When No One Is Around (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=SKVcQnyEIT8)

:swoon: :respec:

galaxygirl
01-11-2012, 04:26 AM
After having posted earlier that I'm not much of a big YA fan, I got bitten by the bug and read two in the last two days :shuffle: and have finished four books overall this year. I've given myself a challenge on goodreads (http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/3013105-sarah?shelf=) and the YA books are helping me pad my stats. :)

So far this year:

Remarkable Creatures by Sean B Carroll (http://www.amazon.com/Remarkable-Creatures-Adventures-Origins-Species/dp/B004KABG5E/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326254063&sr=1-1) 4/5. Basically a collection of essays about natural scientists and their efforts at discovering the origins of life. It took a bit of getting into but it was good once it got going. The best parts, for me, were the chapters on Roy Chapman Andrews (the guy that Indiana Jones is indirectly based on) and molecular paleontology.

The Winter Queen by Boris Akunin (http://www.amazon.com/Winter-Queen-Novel-Fandorin-Mystery/dp/0812968778/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326254458&sr=1-1) 5/5. I LOVED this book, mainly due to the prose. I usually dislike a lot of current literary books because the authors often seem to be trying to hard to write 'literary' and genre books aren't really known for their prose so it was nice to find nice, well written prose in a genre book that read like it came naturally to the author. Also when I read books with humor, I usually don't get it but this book actually made me chuckle several times.

Variant by Robison Wells (http://www.amazon.com/Variant-Robison-Wells/dp/0062026089/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326254759&sr=1-1) 4/5. Fun but ended on a cliffhanger. It just came out, so God knows when the sequel will be published. :mad:

Scored by Lauren McLaughlin (http://www.amazon.com/Scored-Lauren-McLaughlin/dp/0375868208/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326254847&sr=1-1) 3/5. About a society where people are constantly monitored by a software program that scores them on five traits. A person's score determines what kind of jobs they'll be able to get once they get out of school. This was a 4 for me until the end. For some reason, I thought this was the first book in a series so I was reading right along, enjoying myself until the last page where I was expecting a nice little cliffhanger, when all of a sudden the book ended, not with a bang but a whimper. Still, it's worth reading if you want something mindless to keep you occupied for a couple of hours.

Up next:

Legend by Marie Lu (http://www.amazon.com/Legend-Marie-Lu/dp/039925675X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326255267&sr=1-1). Another first book in a YA series. I'm also in the middle of the Divergent, Hunger Games and Variant series so if I start another new series I need to start one that's already complete because I'm afraid that they'll all run together in my mind and I'll be lost when I read the upcoming books. :shuffle:

River of Darkness by Buddy Levy (http://www.amazon.com/River-Darkness-Francisco-Orellanas-Legendary/dp/0553807501/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326255040&sr=1-1). About the first full trip down the Amazon by white guys.

Jamrach's Menagerie by Carol Birch (http://www.amazon.com/Jamrachs-Menagerie-Novel-Carol-Birch/dp/038553440X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326255213&sr=1-1). From the 2011 Booker Short List.

IceAlisa
01-11-2012, 05:07 AM
The library has unexpectedly delivered: I have requested Catherine The Great by Robert Massie and it's here! Need to finish up Shirley. Off to read a few chapters before bed.

Buzz
01-11-2012, 01:11 PM
The Winter Queen by Boris Akunin (http://www.amazon.com/Winter-Queen-Novel-Fandorin-Mystery/dp/0812968778/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326254458&sr=1-1) 5/5. I LOVED this book, mainly due to the prose. I usually dislike a lot of current literary books because the authors often seem to be trying to hard to write 'literary' and genre books aren't really known for their prose so it was nice to find nice, well written prose in a genre book that read like it came naturally to the author. Also when I read books with humor, I usually don't get it but this book actually made me chuckle several times.

Someone recommended Akunin's books to me some time ago and I have read several. Glad to see I am not the only one to enjoy his work and the english movie version of this book promises to be out sometime this year starring Anton Yelchin.

galaxygirl
01-11-2012, 02:19 PM
Someone recommended Akunin's books to me some time ago and I have read several. Glad to see I am not the only one to enjoy his work and the english movie version of this book promises to be out sometime this year starring Anton Yelchin.

Thanks--I've put it on my watch list at imdb.com. One concern I have is that Milla Jovovich is in it. I like her, but only in crappy B-movies. She tends to bring down other movies for me due to her crappy B-movie acting.

aliceanne
01-11-2012, 02:30 PM
There were six Bronte siblings and they all died before they made it to their 40s . . . their father outlived them all. Can you imagine? I don't get the impression that he was the most lovable man on Earth, but I feel for him. :(

I read somewhere that the average life expectancy in Haworth was 28, so the Brontes actually beat the odds somewhat. It tells you how self-absorbed the father was - I would have gotten the family out after the oldest 2 and the mother died in quick succession. The maternal grandparents were well-to-do merchants in Cornwall they could have gotten them out.