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Prancer
01-09-2012, 08:50 PM
It makes you wonder what publishers would make nowadays of three novels being submitted simultaneously as the work of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell.

The publisher is the one who had them use male names. It wasn't seemly for ladies to write books, you know :drama:.

orientalplane
01-09-2012, 08:52 PM
I thought the decision to use male names was on the advice of their father, after Charlotte's first (published posthumously) novel The Professor was turned down, but I could be wrong.

orientalplane
01-09-2012, 08:56 PM
It wasn't seemly for ladies to write books, you know :drama:.

I know.

ETA: Sorry for the double post.

Grannyfan
01-09-2012, 09:00 PM
I'm a few chapters into Alan Bradley's I Am Half-Sick of Shadows, the 4th Flavia de Luce book. So far so good -- we have a snowed-in manor house, a film company and an aging star ... and Flavia finally asking the question of why her sisters hate her so. (I'm hoping that, since she's asked it, we might actually get an answer.)

And who doesn't love a book that takes its title from Tennyson?

Finished this one a few weeks back. I love Flavia although this was not my favorite of the series. I still enjoyed it, though, all that decaying manor atmosphere, etc. It just took a good long while for things to really get going.

Prancer
01-09-2012, 09:11 PM
I thought the decision to use male names was on the advice of their father, after Charlotte's first (published posthumously) novel The Professor was turned down, but I could be wrong.

You are probably right and I am probably wrong. I try not to think too much about the Victorians, but they are always there :P.

aliceanne
01-09-2012, 09:32 PM
What did you read about Emily?

According to Gaskell Emily never spoke to or acknowledged anyone she didn't like who came to the house. She tolerated Gaskell, Ellen Nussey, and Mary Taylor (Charlotte's friends) but that was about it.

The Brontes' had a fierce bulldog which threatened them when they tried to get him off the beds. On day Emily hauled him off the bed and punched him in the face. He faithfully followed her everywhere after that, as if she were the leader of the pack. However, she had great sympathy for/with animals.
A dog came by the house one day who appeared thirsty (possibly rabid). Emily brought him some water, and the dog bit her. She calmly took an iron out of the fire and cauterized the wound and went about her business without saying a word.

Gaskell interviewed M. Heger, their professor in Belgium (Charlotte's obsession). He described Emily as being like a man. Strong-minded, absolute in her opinions. She preferred the fashions from a previous era and sewed her own clothes. When the other students asked why she didn't wear a corset she just shrugged and said that she preferred her natural shape.

She hated to be away from home even more than the others, and loved being out on the moors. In essence, except for the fact that she wasn't deliberately cruel, she was Heathcliff.

I don't see any similarity between her and Shirley, other than the rabid dog story. Shirley is too perky and will totally annoy you in the end (worse than Caroline Helstone).

IceAlisa
01-09-2012, 09:38 PM
Thanks. :eek: Emily and the rabid dog story.

So far Shirley is behaving well.

Nomad
01-09-2012, 09:43 PM
I thought the decision to use male names was on the advice of their father, after Charlotte's first (published posthumously) novel The Professor was turned down, but I could be wrong.

No, they decided that themselves. Their father didn't even know they'd written novels until after they'd been published.

As for women assuming male pseudonyms, some did it in order to be taken more seriously by publishers and literary critics. Many women, however, published under their own names or female psedonyms - Frances Trollope, Elizabeth Gaskell, Margaret Oliphant, Dinah Mulock Craik, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, to name just a few.

aliceanne
01-09-2012, 10:12 PM
I thought the decision to use male names was on the advice of their father, after Charlotte's first (published posthumously) novel The Professor was turned down, but I could be wrong.

According to Charlotte, her publisher liked her style, but thought the subject of the "Professor" was too dull to be a commercial success. Always one to take criticism to heart and never one to do things in moderation, "Jane Eyre" was born.

The Bell names were intended to be gender-neutral.

Nomad
01-09-2012, 11:20 PM
According to Charlotte, her publisher liked her style, but thought the subject of the "Professor" was too dull to be a commercial success. Always one to take criticism to heart and never one to do things in moderation, "Jane Eyre" was born.

The Bell names were intended to be gender-neutral.

Well, the publisher was right. The Professor was dull. I'd rank it 7th of the Bronte novels.

Erin
01-10-2012, 02:53 AM
I started reading The Book Thief after recommendations here. I'm enjoying it now that I'm into it, but it took me a while before I was able to get into the groove. One thing I learned last night is that it is not pre-bedtime reading. I was reading it in bed last night and had nightmares all night. I'll have to wait until the weekend to finish it now.

I decided I should read The Hunger Games before my next hair appointment (which is desperately needed) because my hairdresser recommended it at my last appointment and it will be a good conversation topic to help fill the three hours it takes to get my hair cut and coloured. So, for rather strange reasons, that one's up next.

BigB08822
01-10-2012, 07:09 AM
The Book Thief also took me a bit to get into. I felt very lost because it didn't have the typical layout of most books which are broken into chapters. I felt like I was lost and not sure how to read the story but you finally learn to just keep reading as if it is chapters. I tried explaining this to my stepmom who quit but I don't know if she ever gave it another chance. It was well worth it, one of my favorite books ever.

Jot the Dot Dot
01-10-2012, 09:52 AM
Just started reading "Somewhere Inside" by Lisa & Laura Ling, their account of Laura's unfathomable nightmare being imprisoned inside North Korea, and Lis'a unenviable task of (eventually) securing her release. Considering the fate of the native North Koreans, she was one of the lucky ones.

orientalplane
01-10-2012, 10:28 AM
No, they decided that themselves. Their father didn't even know they'd written novels until after they'd been published.


Ah, that's interesting. Thanks for correcting me. :)

Prancer
01-10-2012, 05:11 PM
A little early Valentine for all the print lovers :):

What Books Get Up To When No One Is Around (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=SKVcQnyEIT8)