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my little pony
01-09-2012, 04:20 AM
:confused: I guess I'm not sure what literature you are referring to.

i'm guessing anthropology, they love to dig up privies

rfisher
01-09-2012, 04:24 AM
i'm guessing anthropology, they love to dig up privies

The best stuff ends up in the privy.

Prancer
01-09-2012, 04:27 AM
i'm guessing anthropology, they love to dig up privies

Yeah, but rfisher said the literature of the day, so......:confused:

IceAlisa
01-09-2012, 04:31 AM
... I've read theories that Emily, at least, would be probably be diagnosed with Asperger's today.

Ah. That explains the anti-social tendencies she imparted on her characters.


I question whether evidence really supports this. It's the tormented artist myth. Plus, there is also a belief that intelligent people are more prone to mental illness. . .however, people I know who've been in psychiatric hospitals tell me that this their experience at all.
You can look it up. However, this doesn't mean that psych wards are filled with artistic geniuses and certainly this doesn't have to conform to anecdotal evidence.

Japanfan
01-09-2012, 08:30 AM
I am quite fond of them, as I consider myself weak, irrational and unstable, and therefore think all other women are, too. I know *I* am highstrung and hysterical most of the time, which is why I'm so fixated on promoting the idea.

Don't worry, you're not alone. :)

Wyliefan
01-09-2012, 02:07 PM
Well, I love Dickinson, and not just because it's such fun to make freshmen laugh by having them sing her poems to the tune of the Gilligan's Island theme song.


I've always heard it was "The Yellow Rose of Texas."

zaphyre14
01-09-2012, 02:54 PM
I have always hated the Brontes in general.

I finished Trevanian and "....Hornet's Nest" and am happy to be done with both. I look at them both as I do my visit to the Dachau concentration camp: I'm satisfied that I did it but I don't care to repeat the experience.

I'm noew reading the print format of James Patterson's "Kill Me If You Can" - the short chapters and viewpoint shifts are mildly annoying. And I have the audio of Lois Lowry's "The Giver" going in the car. Of the two, it's the more interesting concept to me. I never really cared for Lowry back in the days when I was reading and studying Children's Literature and I'd missed this one. I'm impressed by the untopian society she's built. It's so perfect, it's creepy.

Fergus
01-09-2012, 03:35 PM
I've always heard it was "The Yellow Rose of Texas."

My 16yo niece just did a paper on Emily Dickinson and we all sat around the kitchen table taking turns singing it with BOTH melodies. :rofl:

They both sort of work. :D

Artemis@BC
01-09-2012, 05:30 PM
I'm a few chapters into Alan Bradley's I Am Half-Sick of Shadows, the 4th Flavia de Luce book. So far so good -- we have a snowed-in manor house, a film company and an aging star ... and Flavia finally asking the question of why her sisters hate her so. (I'm hoping that, since she's asked it, we might actually get an answer.)

And who doesn't love a book that takes its title from Tennyson?

aliceanne
01-09-2012, 05:44 PM
So, ever since I started bitching about sentimentality on the previous page, I've been wondering: what defines it?

Where does the writing cross the line from passionate to maudlin? Is it subjective?

A passionate person shares my sentiments, a maudlin person is making a big deal over nothing :lol:

I like the romantic periods in music, art, and literature because unlike Prancer I am very even-tempered and stable. It's escapism for me to venture into someone elses realm. I find Mr. Rochester attractive, but if I met him in real life I would run the other way.

All I can say about "Wuthering Heights" is that it is so Emily (based on what I have read about her). If people found "Jane Eyre" graphic and unladylike, I can only imagine what they thought of that one when it was first published.

PrincessLeppard
01-09-2012, 05:52 PM
I'm reading Shakespeare Undead. He's a vampire. There are also zombies in it. So, really, it's the perfect book. :)

Well, so far, anyway. :P

IceAlisa
01-09-2012, 07:06 PM
All I can say about "Wuthering Heights" is that it is so Emily (based on what I have read about her). If people found "Jane Eyre" graphic and unladylike, I can only imagine what they thought of that one when it was first published.
What did you read about Emily?

orientalplane
01-09-2012, 07:10 PM
All I can say about "Wuthering Heights" is that it is so Emily (based on what I have read about her). If people found "Jane Eyre" graphic and unladylike, I can only imagine what they thought of that one when it was first published.

Well, it was published under a male pseudonym.

Prancer
01-09-2012, 08:43 PM
I've always heard it was "The Yellow Rose of Texas."

Oh, haven't tried that one, but I will add it to my list.

There is a reason that ballad meter is also called common meter, though; it IS common. I used to have a list of melodies that you could sing Dickinson to, but I lost it somewhere.


I like the romantic periods in music, art, and literature because unlike Prancer I am very even-tempered and stable.

:lol:


Well, it was published under a male pseudonym.

So was Jane Eyre.

orientalplane
01-09-2012, 08:47 PM
So was Jane Eyre.

It makes you wonder what publishers would make nowadays of three novels being submitted simultaneously as the work of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell.