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PrincessLeppard
01-04-2012, 05:47 PM
But I did find one book (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12266205-how-to-eat-a-cupcake) coming soon, just for you.

:encore:


There are none. Only heartwarming Sparks-esque love stories for you! :P

:scream:

I got Monsters of Men from the library here at school. It's the third book in the Chaos Walking series. I thought the end of the Ask and the Answer dragged a bit (so much dithering :blah: ), but still looking forward to finishing the series.

IceAlisa
01-04-2012, 07:21 PM
Oh good! :) I want to hear all about it!

:P This intro really appealed to me:

If you are 'expecting passion and stimulus and melodrama', forget it, Bronte tells us. All I am going to let you have is 'something unromantic as Monday morning'.

Yes, please!

The intro also says that Charlotte was an admirer of George Sand whom I remember despising after reading Consuelo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consuelo_(novel)). But it appears Shirley is a far cry from that, thankfully. Although one can easily see the maudlin influence in Jane Eyre. Interestingly, A.S. Byatt's Possession is reputed to have been influenced as well but I don't see it.

Speaking of Charlotte Bronte: http://news.yahoo.com/unpublished-bronte-manuscript-sells-1-million-183244998.html

Prancer
01-04-2012, 07:26 PM
Probably I should time myself. . .

If you really want to know, there are several sites on the web where you can read a timed sample and take a comprehension test.

Wyliefan
01-04-2012, 09:24 PM
Speaking of Charlotte Bronte: http://news.yahoo.com/unpublished-bronte-manuscript-sells-1-million-183244998.html

How cool is that! I've heard about those tiny manuscripts she used to write -- it would so fascinating to see one. Despite the risk of eyestrain.

Speaking of original manuscripts, that of A Tale of Two Cities (http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/charles-dickens-a-tale-of-two-cities/) has been put online. I've been really enjoying browsing through it, seeing where Dickens crossed things out and added things in.

(Yes, I know I need a life, you don't have to tell me. :D )

Japanfan
01-04-2012, 11:03 PM
I picked up Sheri Tepper's The Gate to Women's Country (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/104344.The_Gate_to_Women_s_Country) yesterday, hoping that it'll fit a task about dark religion on the reading challenge I'm taking, but I'm not overly hopeful, so if anyone else has any book recommendation regarding books that contains "dark religion", I'd be happy to hear them. :)

I loved the book - have enjoyed all of Tepper's work and this was one of her best. But I'm not sure if it fits the 'dark religion' theme because I'm not sure what the term means. I would assume it refers to the dark side of religion?

If so, this book wouldn't really qualify. A two-book series that would, however, are 'The Psalms of Herod' and 'The Sword of Mary', by Esther M. Friesner. They are a fantasy about a dystopian world based on a punitive view of Christianity. Fantastic books as well - among my fantasy favourites.

ETA: And of course 'The Handmaid's Tale' - Margaret Atwood used Puritanism as the basis for the worldview put forth in the novel.

Artemis@BC
01-04-2012, 11:50 PM
Now that I've seen the rude Amerikan version of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, I really want to re-read the series. I thought the 3rd one was the best although there are major verisimilitude issues in all 3 books.

I still haven't read books 2 and 3. I read the first book, then saw the 3 (Swedish) movies, and thought the movie of Dragon Tattoo, at least, was a fairly significant improvement on the book. The book was ok -- good story but needed a serious edit. So I haven't rushed out to read the other 2.

However I them loaded onto my Kobo, and might get to them soon -- I'm off to the Caribbean next week, and plan on a lot of reading. In addition to the Larsson books, I also have the following ready to go with my umbrella drinks:

~ the Game of Thrones series
~ the Hunger Games trilogy
~ The Book Thief
~ Year of the Flood (Margaret Atwood)
~ A Place of Execution (Val McDermid)
~ The High Road (Terry Fallis)
~ Suck It, Wonderwoman (Olivia Munn)
~ Wicked (Gregory Maguire)
~ The Gun Seller (Hugh Laurie)
~ Heat Wave ("Richard Castle" LOL)
~ Fatherland (Robert Harris)
~ the complete Jeeves collection (P.G. Wodehouse)
~ Exit Music -- the last Rebus, and The Complaints -- the first Fox (Ian Rankin)
~ A Dirty Job (Christopher Moore)
~ and all the free classics that came with the Kobo

Where to start?!

Holley Calmes
01-04-2012, 11:53 PM
How cool is that! I've heard about those tiny manuscripts she used to write -- it would so fascinating to see one. Despite the risk of eyestrain.

Speaking of original manuscripts, that of A Tale of Two Cities (http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/charles-dickens-a-tale-of-two-cities/) has been put online. I've been really enjoying browsing through it, seeing where Dickens crossed things out and added things in.

(Yes, I know I need a life, you don't have to tell me. :D )

Probably my favorite book of all time. Although I do love Dumas, and I'm a Musketeer at heart.

Wyliefan
01-05-2012, 02:37 AM
Mine too.

chipso1
01-05-2012, 03:20 AM
I'm halfway through "The Hunger Games" right now. It's good, but not amazing like all the hype has been making it out to be. Is it worth it to read the 2nd and 3rd books?

I also ordered "Frozen Teardrop" from Amazon tonight and should have it by Friday. Can't wait to read it! :)

ETA: Other books I'm interested in checking out: "Moloka'i," "The Invisible Bridge," and "Please Look After Mom." Has anybody read those and if so, are they worth it?

oleada
01-05-2012, 03:32 AM
ETA: Other books I'm interested in checking out: "Moloka'i," "The Invisible Bridge," and "Please Look After Mom." Has anybody read those and if so, are they worth it?

I've read Please Look After Mom. I loved it. It took me a while to get into it, but once I did, I couldn't put it down. I thought the author did an amazing job at creating the characters and developing the family relationships. I love books that make me feel and this one did it in spades. I teared up in the end and wanted to hug my mom. :shuffle: I definitely recommend it.

PrincessLeppard
01-05-2012, 03:35 AM
I'm halfway through "The Hunger Games" right now. It's good, but not amazing like all the hype has been making it out to be. Is it worth it to read the 2nd and 3rd books??

First time in this thread? :P rfisher and I think the third book is utter tripe. Other, less refined members of this community thinks it's "okay" and a few of them :wideeyes: actually thought it was good. Clearly, they are deranged, and should not be allowed to handle sharp objects. ;)

The second book is good, though. :)

rfisher
01-05-2012, 03:43 AM
First time in this thread? :P rfisher and I think the third book is utter tripe. Other, less refined members of this community thinks it's "okay" and a few of them :wideeyes: actually thought it was good. Clearly, they are deranged, and should not be allowed to handle sharp objects. ;)

The second book is good, though. :)

Indeed. We tried to tell them. I still think they really didn't like it but are just being contrary. :P

chipso1
01-05-2012, 04:07 AM
I've read Please Look After Mom. I loved it. It took me a while to get into it, but once I did, I couldn't put it down. I thought the author did an amazing job at creating the characters and developing the family relationships. I love books that make me feel and this one did it in spades. I teared up in the end and wanted to hug my mom. :shuffle: I definitely recommend it.

Yay! I'll definitely purchase it now! Thanks!


First time in this thread? :P rfisher and I think the third book is utter tripe. Other, less refined members of this community thinks it's "okay" and a few of them :wideeyes: actually thought it was good. Clearly, they are deranged, and should not be allowed to handle sharp objects. ;)

The second book is good, though. :)

I've lurked in this thread, but didn't want to wade through 600+ posts to see what the general consensus was. :shuffle: Thanks for the info, though! :)

Evilynn
01-05-2012, 08:34 AM
I loved the book - have enjoyed all of Tepper's work and this was one of her best. But I'm not sure if it fits the 'dark religion' theme because I'm not sure what the term means. I would assume it refers to the dark side of religion?

Well, therein lies my problem. I have no idea :lol: Generally speaking the tasks are lenient, so it'd only have to contain a bit about dark religion, not necessarily be about dark religion. I asked for a clarification and anything along the lines of voodoo and witchcraft apparently suffices (I wouldn't always think of those religions as "dark", but I suppose I'll follow the rules :shuffle:)

Oh well, I've been meaning to read Tepper for ages anyway. I guess I picked a good one to start with. :)



If so, this book wouldn't really qualify. A two-book series that would, however, are 'The Psalms of Herod' and 'The Sword of Mary', by Esther M. Friesner. They are a fantasy about a dystopian world based on a punitive view of Christianity. Fantastic books as well - among my fantasy favourites.

ETA: And of course 'The Handmaid's Tale' - Margaret Atwood used Puritanism as the basis for the worldview put forth in the novel.

The Handmaid's Tale is probably my favourite book, but ideally I'd like to read something I haven't read before. I'll check out of the Friesner books and see if I can get a hold of them in time for the challenge, thanks. :)

Japanfan
01-05-2012, 09:06 AM
Well, therein lies my problem. I have no idea :lol: Generally speaking the tasks are lenient, so it'd only have to contain a bit about dark religion, not necessarily be about dark religion. I asked for a clarification and anything along the lines of voodoo and witchcraft apparently suffices (I wouldn't always think of those religions as "dark", but I suppose I'll follow the rules :shuffle:)


Oh, dear. Speaking of fantasy - I'm not a reader of 'serious fiction' - I can't think of any works that treat voodoo and witchcraft as exclusively dark religions. Usually such religious/spiritual capacities and practices are seen to have both dark and light dimensions.

The one that comes to mind is Anne Rice's "The Witching Hour". But to me the book digressed into soft pornography - I believe Rice writes porn under a pseudonym - and didn't explore religious themes in a meaningful way.



Oh well, I've been meaning to read Tepper for ages anyway. I guess I picked a good one to start with. :)


Yes. I'd say "Gate to Women's County" is her masterpiece. But "Grass", "The Family Tree" and "Gibbons Rise and Fall" are also wonderful. Tepper's books continually foreground feminist and ecological themes, to the point of excess sometimes. But the stories are invariably gripping and exciting. . .I think I'll revisit them in the near future. Enjoy. :)