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View Full Version : An FSU Without a Book Thread is Like an FS Event Without Snark



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IceAlisa
01-03-2012, 04:41 PM
Byatt vs. Atwood. I just noticed that all but one on my reading list are women writers.

zaphyre14
01-03-2012, 04:57 PM
I finished Evanovich's "* 18" in about three hours. I was sick all weekend so I read "The Girl Who Played with Fire" and 2/3rds of "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest" in three days. I probably could have finished the last one if I'd stayed off FaceBook. :)

Spinner
01-03-2012, 05:36 PM
Not me. If I am reading a really good book that has me in its grip, I can't read it fast enough.
Oh I've had this experience too and I've found that my retention is still pretty good. Personally I think I enjoy more the books that capture me. And thanks for the Nook tips! Care to post direct links here for those who don't have access to the archives? :)

Prancer
01-03-2012, 08:16 PM
And thanks for the Nook tips! Care to post direct links here for those who don't have access to the archives? :)

You can't see everything I linked? AFAIK, you don't have to be a member or anything to see those pages.

You should be able to just click on the book covers and that should take you right to B&N. The classics have been free for months, but they were all checked about a week ago and were still free.

If you go click through from The Cheap, the women who run The Cheap get credits for the downloads and they use at least some of those credits to offer prizes for their followers--everything from bookmarks to Nook tablets.

One thing, though--if you see something you want, snap it up, because some of those specials are only good for hours, not days, and certainly not months. I've gotten a couple that were on one-hour specials.

ETA: Never mind; I have been informed that I supplied the wrong URL. PML at what I linked! You should be able to see the freebies now.

BigB08822
01-03-2012, 08:28 PM
Amazon's Kindle section also has tons of free classics. All completely free. Not sure if this is always the case or just for now. I think most of them are always free, though. I haven't looked at what Nook has, though, their selection may be bigger.

Wyliefan
01-03-2012, 08:42 PM
IceAlisa, I vote for the Bronte. :) For purely selfish reasons, mind you. I haven't read Shirley yet, and I want a review!

agalisgv
01-03-2012, 09:15 PM
If I am reading a really good book that has me in its grip, I can't read it fast enough. If I am not particularly caught up in a story, well, it can take me a long time to read. This!

I don't read fiction unless I like it, so it always goes quickly. For non-fiction, I generally appreciate what I read there too (appreciation being rather distinct from enjoyment :shuffle: ), but in that case I'm mining for very specific things, so I can be more efficient than I would be otherwise.

Not sure if this has been mentioned before, but for all those political progressives out there who also like to read low-brow fiction, there's Barbara Wilson. She's a radical lesbian feminist who writes murder mysteries set in politically progressive circles (her first book was Murder in the Collective).

http://www.amazon.com/Murder-Collective-Wilson-Barbara/dp/B001G8WW92/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325624841&sr=1-1

Anyhow, it's a bit different than one's normal fare. Her second book, Sisters of the Road, is on sale for just a penny for the bargain hunters out there.

http://www.amazon.com/Sisters-Road-Barbara-Wilson/dp/1878067249

rfisher
01-03-2012, 10:02 PM
Oh I've had this experience too and I've found that my retention is still pretty good. Personally I think I enjoy more the books that capture me. And thanks for the Nook tips! Care to post direct links here for those who don't have access to the archives? :)

I can't tell you how much it saddens me to see you post about Nook. And asking for tips now??? It's a good thing the world as we know it will end in December.

moojja
01-03-2012, 10:43 PM
Amazon's Kindle section also has tons of free classics. All completely free. Not sure if this is always the case or just for now. I think most of them are always free, though. I haven't looked at what Nook has, though, their selection may be bigger.

The Gutenberg project has a list of free books (all copyrights expired), that's formatted for both Kindle and Nook. But I have notice some proof-reading issues with their books, but nothing major.
http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

genevieve
01-03-2012, 11:08 PM
Not sure if this has been mentioned before, but for all those political progressives out there who also like to read low-brow fiction, there's Barbara Wilson. She's a radical lesbian feminist who writes murder mysteries set in politically progressive circles (her first book was Murder in the Collective).

http://www.amazon.com/Murder-Collective-Wilson-Barbara/dp/B001G8WW92/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325624841&sr=1-1

Anyhow, it's a bit different than one's normal fare. Her second book, Sisters of the Road, is on sale for just a penny for the bargain hunters out there.

http://www.amazon.com/Sisters-Road-Barbara-Wilson/dp/1878067249

I love Barbara Wilson, even though her main character in the Pam Nilsen series is a dingbat that I always want to take my the shoulders and shake a bit. Murder in the Collective is such a time capsule about '80s activism, and about a Seattle that's long gone.

Her Cassandra Reilly series is better. Trouble in Transylvania makes me want to travel, and Gaudi Afternoon was even made into a movie with Marcia Gay Harden, Lili Taylor, Judy Davis and Juliette Lewis!

IceAlisa
01-03-2012, 11:31 PM
IceAlisa, I vote for the Bronte. :) For purely selfish reasons, mind you. I haven't read Shirley yet, and I want a review!

:lol: I will consider it.

aliceanne
01-04-2012, 12:10 AM
I just finished "Charlotte Bronte" by Mary Gaskill, "Shirley" by Bronte and "All the Pain Money Can Buy", the biography of Christina Onassis, and all I can say is wow. Some women make life SO hard. A lot of whining and pining in all 3 books. It makes me glad I'm not a great novelist or wealthy heiress.

Bronte was crippled by her acquiesance to authority (she never could escape her father's influence). As much as she complained about her chronic ill-health, she never would leave home, even though her own father acknowledged that the village water supply was contaminated. She only married when her father had one foot in the grave and all of her siblings were dead. She also fretted about not being beautiful or attractive to the opposite sex, but she insisted on wearing dowdy outdated clothes and hairstyles.

Christina didn't even learn enough self-discipline to do basic things like eat a healthy meal or go to bed at night. If she had to go somewhere in the morning after staying up all night watching tv, she would take an amphetamine. If she wanted to sleep, she took barbiturates. If she wanted to lose weight for a boyfriend after living on a diet including 18 Coca Colas a day, she went to a spa and lost 50lbs in a ridiculously short time.

They both died shy of 40. Christina of heart failure, and Charlotte of TB, typoid, morning sickness, or a combination of all 3.

LilJen
01-04-2012, 12:14 AM
I am almost done with Nothing To Envy, needless to say it's heartbreaking. :fragile:

What should I read next out of these:

On The Chinese Screen by Somerset Maugham

Shirley by Charlotte Bronte

Snow Flower And The Secret Fan by Lisa See

The Provincial Lady In Russia by E.M. Delafield

Angels And Insects by A.S. Byatt

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

?

Of those I've only read "Snow Flower." It was quite good. Not an easy read; some heartbreaking stuff in there, but very interesting and great characters. As well as nearly everything you ever wanted to know about foot binding :scream:

Japanfan
01-04-2012, 12:29 AM
Wouldn't there be a lot of variables involved in that, like font size, margins and difficulty of text?


I'm basing my estimate on standard book pages - the font can be bigger or smaller, of course, but generally falls within a small range. And of course difficulty and density make a difference. But on average, I read about 400 pages of fiction a week and that generally works out to about 30 per hour. Most of what I read is fairly complex in terms of writing but not heavy duty reading and I'm reading for pleasure. However, I often do go back and forth in the text to double check various details.

But when I'm on vacation I can go through a few hundred pages in a day.

However, reading something like Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto' would be much slower going.




The average person reads about 200 words a minute, which is roughly the same number of words a person can read out loud. Faster readers simply absorb text differently; they are not "reading out loud" in their heads but visually comprehending the text, which is why it's faster.


I have no idea how fast I read; my husband often accuses me of skimming material that I am reading at what I consider a normal speed. But I have to say that it is not at all unusual for me to read a book a day, depending, of course, on what else I have to do. On vacation, I can easily do a book a day if the book is good; I've often done two and occasionally three, but only when I have nothing at all else to do.


I would say a read at least 400 words a minute - and I also accuse my husband of skimming material. Very often we read the same book and I'll notice that his misses important details.

Spinner
01-04-2012, 12:35 AM
I can't tell you how much it saddens me to see you post about Nook. And asking for tips now??? It's a good thing the world as we know it will end in December.

It'll be ok, I promise. Right now I've only purchased 3 books on it. Some others were free classics. The main reason I got it was to have access to the many digital advanced editions I can get via my work. So far I have 11 ARCs left to read, most notably Toni Morrison's newest, Home, due on shelves in May.