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Michalle
12-27-2011, 10:15 PM
Into the Woods is good, but I warn you, I thought the ending was super annoying.

rfisher
12-27-2011, 10:44 PM
I haven't had time to read much since I got back from my trip a month ago. I still have about 80 pages left to go on John Henry Days, which I want to finish but man is it wordy mcwordersons. So I started a new book - Into the Woods, by Tana French. It's a murder mystery set in Ireland. I am loving her writing, even more than the story itself (which is pretty interesting). I'm happy to see she's got another book with some of the same characters.


I've heard this about her books--mysteries for the more literary-minded. They always sell well.

I liked the first, but deep sixed the second after about 3 chapters. Not nearly as good, IMHO.

Cachoo
12-27-2011, 10:54 PM
I finished P.D. James "Death Comes to Pemberley" and I liked it but did not enjoy it as much as her regular series. I give her credit for the attempt. No spoilers---just glad that Mr. Darcy was with us much of the time and wish Elizabeth was with us a little more. I imagine sleuthing might have been more difficult for a woman in Austen's England.

genevieve
12-27-2011, 11:01 PM
Into the Woods is good, but I warn you, I thought the ending was super annoying.
:fragile:


I liked the first, but deep sixed the second after about 3 chapters. Not nearly as good, IMHO.
hmmm....keep in mind that I do not absolutely hate Mockingjay, so I may think the other book is JUST FAB! ;)

rfisher
12-28-2011, 12:09 AM
:fragile:


hmmm....keep in mind that I do not absolutely hate Mockingjay, so I may think the other book is JUST FAB! ;)

:drama: You'll say you did even if you agree with me. And IceAlisa. :drama: :lol:

genevieve
12-28-2011, 01:02 AM
:drama: You'll say you did even if you agree with me. And IceAlisa. :drama: :lol:

oh trust me, if I don't like it, I'll let you know :lol:

Marge_Simpson
12-28-2011, 06:52 AM
I'd love to hear more about what you think of this book..

"Aquariums of Pyongyang" had my eyes popping as much as "Nothing to Envy", and it's definitely worth reading.
That said, while it opened my eyes, it did not have the same effect on me, perhaps because of the writing style, which seemed very detached.
In Demick's book, I felt horror and sympathy for all the people whose lives she documented, even those who started out as "true believers". I could feel my stomach clenching as she described someone foraging for weeds because they were starving to death, and imagine the bone-chilling cold as someone crossed the river to China on foot.
When Chol-Whan described things, it was more like this: "I was hungry, so I caught a rat and ate it." So my reaction was "Oh, well, too bad for you."

Evilynn
12-28-2011, 04:05 PM
I crammed in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (I'm probably the last Swedish person to read it :shuffle:), Philip K. Dick's "The Minority Report" and Carl Jonas Love Almqvist's "Det går an" over xmas, along with finishing up John Ajvide Lindqvist's Harbor (highly recommended!) and half the first Anita Blake book (Guilty Pleasures) by Laurel K Hamilton. For some reason I've never read the first book, despite reading a couple of the later ones. :confused:

Finnice
12-28-2011, 09:31 PM
I finished P.D. James "Death Comes to Pemberley" and I liked it but did not enjoy it as much as her regular series. I give her credit for the attempt. No spoilers---just glad that Mr. Darcy was with us much of the time and wish Elizabeth was with us a little more. I imagine sleuthing might have been more difficult for a woman in Austen's England.

I read it too, and enjoyed. I hate sequels written by other writers, I donīt read them. Both P.D. James and Jane Austen belong to my top ten favourite authors (donīt ask who the other 8 are, I canīt tell) but this was an exeption.

I felt that Ms. James had thought: "I have written very seroius, gloomy, deep and litterary mysteries for 50 years, I am 90 now, so letīs have some fun!" I would not call her writing tongue-in-cheeck, but felt that she really enjoyed of using Austenian language without doing too much, and the sleuthing methods of that time. She also filled some gaps Austen did not. If you like that kind of litterature, I heartily recommend "Death comes to Pemberly".

:hat1:To Ms. James. She is a great writer.

Finnice
12-28-2011, 09:36 PM
Carl Jonas Love Almqvist's "Det går an" over xmas,

CJL Almqvist!!! Men han skriver underbart! Evilynn, puss och kram!
Sorry folks, it is just amazing to hear someone reading one of my favourite classical Swedish poets. Almqvist:rollin:

Buzz
12-29-2011, 02:07 PM
Dave's Way by David Thomas I guess you all know by now I occasionally develop reading obsessions so after reading the Jobs bio I need more so I am now looking to read Dave Thomas's book. His story is just as fascinating in many ways as the aforementioned Steve Jobs. Thomas is of course the founder of Wendy's chain of resturants. He was born to an unwed mother he never knew and lost mother at age five. Him and his father moved from town to town looking for work and at 15 he quit high school to work full time in a resturant. At the time of his death there was thousands of Wendy's all over North America. Should be a great read.

modern_muslimah
12-29-2011, 02:39 PM
I finished two books this week. The first was Carrie Goes Off the Map by Phillipa Ashley. It's story about a woman who gets dumped by her fiance and then decides to go on a road trip across Europe to forget her troubles. Well, she ends up going on the road trip with a doctor who is a friend of her ex-fiance because her friend bails on her at the last minute. To make matters worse, the doctor's passport is expired so they can only travel around the English countryside. So, I'm sure y'all can imagine what happens when you put a hot guy and a woman together in a VW minivan for a month. :lol: It was a pretty good read although a little long. I think Ashley could've cut out at least 50 pages and still got the same story across.

The second book was Pinch Me by Adena Halpern. It's basically a fairy tale set in modern day Philadelphia. The heroine is in love with a doctor (does almost every modern romance novel have to have a doctor as a hero?). However, her great great grandaunt placed a curse on the women in her family. If the women ever marry the men they love, then all sorts of bad things happen to those men. So the heroine's mom and grandmother both tell her not to marry the doctor but to marry a short, bald, fat guy who treats her like crap instead. Well, she goes against their advice and lo and behold, the curse continues. The bulk of the novel is about Lily's attempts to break the curse. It was cute, funny and very entertaining.

attyfan
12-29-2011, 02:56 PM
Continuing my Tudor binge. Finished Tracy Borman's "Elizabeth's Women" (very interesting) and a book by Robert Hutchinson on Thomas Cromwell -- and I plan to read more on him. Am currently reading Loades's book on the Cecils. When I finish it, I will leave the Tudor era. I have one new biography of Richard III, and I expect delivery of a second any day now.

emason
12-29-2011, 05:21 PM
I read it too, and enjoyed. I hate sequels written by other writers, I donīt read them. Both P.D. James and Jane Austen belong to my top ten favourite authors (donīt ask who the other 8 are, I canīt tell) but this was an exeption.

I felt that Ms. James had thought: "I have written very seroius, gloomy, deep and litterary mysteries for 50 years, I am 90 now, so letīs have some fun!" I would not call her writing tongue-in-cheeck, but felt that she really enjoyed of using Austenian language without doing too much, and the sleuthing methods of that time. She also filled some gaps Austen did not. If you like that kind of litterature, I heartily recommend "Death comes to Pemberly".

:hat1:To Ms. James. She is a great writer.

Well, I just finished reading this about 30 minutes ago, and I must say, I was very disappointed. For me, it did not work at all, either as Austen or as James. I have read P&P about 2 dozen times in the last 50 years, and I didn't get the flavor of it very much at all in this. It was an interesting attempt but a big failure for me.

PrincessLeppard
01-01-2012, 04:00 AM
Even though I thought the second half of Matched was absolutely terrible and in no way did I believe the "love" between the two characters alleged to be in love, I decided to read the sequel, Crossed.

Gah.

The author has moved the characters out of the most interesting aspect of the story, which is the dystopian society. The characters have "escaped" and are currently roaming through a canyon. WTF? I still don't buy their "love," and the fact that the main character hasn't questioned anyone when they give her weird looks about her blue pills makes me want to punch her in the face.

But I'll finish it. If only to see how much more irritating she can be.