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IceAlisa
12-23-2011, 04:24 AM
I started Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. So far, I like it.

I think you are going to really enjoy the series, PL.

oleada
12-23-2011, 03:32 PM
My parents' internet is really spotty, so I had time to finish up two books: When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead and Please Look After Mom by Kung-sook Shin. The first was a really lovely read and I totally recommend it. The second one...it broke me. It's rare for me to cry at a book, but the last chapter and epilogue of Please Look After Mom had me tearing up. I think the writer does a great job of describing the family dynamics and building up home. I always assumed that they would find the mother and never considered that they wouldn't and would never find out what happened. Fantastic book.

Fergus
12-24-2011, 03:17 AM
Well, it seems as good a time as any to read Nothing To Envy about North Korea.

I just started that one, too.

Marge_Simpson
12-24-2011, 06:52 AM
I'm currently reading "Aquariums of Pyongyang"; it's just as horrifying as "Nothing to Envy"

Spinner
12-26-2011, 03:15 AM
For fans of Lev Grossman's Magicians books, #3 title and tentative cover design revealed (http://www.tor.com/blogs/2011/12/title-revealed-for-lev-grossmans-third-and-final-magicians-book).

Buzz
12-26-2011, 02:32 PM
NYTimes bestseller lists for 2011, and anything with "non-fiction" attached to it has the Stee Jobs biography as the #1 selling title. :D Steven King's novel on the Kennedy assassination is also number one in it's grouping.
http://www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/overview.html

modern_muslimah
12-26-2011, 04:00 PM
NYTimes bestseller lists for 2011, and anything with "non-fiction" attached to it has the Stee Jobs biography as the #1 selling title. :D Steven King's novel on the Kennedy assassination is also number one in it's grouping.
http://www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/overview.html

I just got the Steve Jobs biography. I had a hold on it for at least a couple of months. That thing is definitely a monster in terms of length. I hope it's easy to read and I can finish reading it in time because I have a feeling that the library won't let me renew it. I still have other books that were holds that came in around the same time. I only have two weeks before classes start again.

viennese
12-26-2011, 04:49 PM
I just started Lev Grossman's first Magician book, it's terrific.

And I'm delighted by a friend's gift: "I Want My MTV" (http://www.avclub.com/articles/craig-marks-and-rob-tannenbaum-i-want-my-mtv-the-u,65244/) - an oral history of MTV by Marks and Tannenbaum. Hilarious, so many incredibly strange and funny anecdotes about the network that was - before all the docureality shows - the place to veg out and watch music videos.

oleada
12-26-2011, 10:48 PM
I'm currently reading "Aquariums of Pyongyang"; it's just as horrifying as "Nothing to Envy"

I'd love to hear more about what you think of this book.

I read Delirium by Lauren Oliver. It was okay. After reading Divergent and The Hunger Games, it just seemed a little bit of a rehash. But it was enjoyable enough for me to get through it quite quickly. I much preferred Before I Fall, though.

I'm at a loss as what to read next.

rjblue
12-26-2011, 11:03 PM
I can't wait for A Memory of Light to come out, and I'm following along on Leigh Butler's re-read blog (http://www.tor.com/features/series/wot-reread) for the rest of the series, so that I'll be ready for it.

The good news for me is that my husband bought me my entire Amazon wish list for Christmas. Eight books, one DVD and two attachments for my handheld blender. That should keep me busy reading for a month or two. I'm starting with the complete works of Theodore Sturgeon.

flyingsit
12-27-2011, 03:09 PM
I just read Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet and I loved it. It takes place during WWII and in the mid-80s, includes Japanese internment camps, conflicts between Asian and American family styles and traditions, and the characters are marvelously created.

Erin
12-27-2011, 05:16 PM
I just read Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet and I loved it. It takes place during WWII and in the mid-80s, includes Japanese internment camps, conflicts between Asian and American family styles and traditions, and the characters are marvelously created.

I read it a couple of months ago and I agree, wonderful book. The part about the Japanese internment camps was particularly fascinating, as I really hadn't known very much about that part of North American history.

genevieve
12-27-2011, 06:15 PM
I haven't had time to read much since I got back from my trip a month ago. I still have about 80 pages left to go on John Henry Days, which I want to finish but man is it wordy mcwordersons. So I started a new book - Into the Woods, by Tana French. It's a murder mystery set in Ireland. I am loving her writing, even more than the story itself (which is pretty interesting). I'm happy to see she's got another book with some of the same characters.

Spinner
12-27-2011, 06:17 PM
So I started a new book - Into the Woods, by Tana French. It's a murder mystery set in Ireland. I am loving her writing, even more than the story itself (which is pretty interesting).
I've heard this about her books--mysteries for the more literary-minded. They always sell well.

flyingsit
12-27-2011, 07:23 PM
I also read Ann Patchett's State of Wonder and was not overly impressed. Not sure why, but it didn't do much for me.