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Cachoo
12-20-2011, 07:16 PM
Well, I'm trying to write a fairly fluffy mystery novel, which I hope someday will be finished to entertain those of you who enjoy fluff -- "dreck" or otherwise.

So mostly I'm reading recent mysteries. Some of them quite fluffy.

Not bestseller enough or deep enough to be worth mentioning here, but I'll let a fellow FSUer borrow them once I'm done. ;)

And I'm reading a lot of works in progress by other would-be authors, some more skilled than me and some less so, for critique exchanges. Between that and all the other stuff I do online (or at the rink), I don't spend as much time sitting down with a book as I did 20 years ago, so for that reason also I don't have as many recent books to discuss.

Is a fluffy mystery the same as a mystery that is referred to as a "cozy?"

gkelly
12-20-2011, 07:19 PM
Is a fluffy mystery the same as a mystery that is referred to as a "cozy?"

Well, I think so. But some definitions of "cozy" are a little too specific for my interests to fit. If a reader is looking for domesticity and G-rated language, I can't oblige.

Wyliefan
12-20-2011, 08:01 PM
My rule of thumb for mysteries: If it has tea in it, I may be able to read it. If it has quilts in it, probably not. If it has tea AND quilts, I run for my life. :scream:

Jenny
12-20-2011, 08:10 PM
My rule of thumb for mysteries: If it has tea in it, I may be able to read it. If it has quilts in it, probably not. If it has tea AND quilts, I run for my life. :scream:

I guess you don't like Miss Marple then. My favourite Agatha Christie of all time is A Murder is Announced, and there is a pivotal scene in a village tea shop. She doesn't quilt, but she knits.

One of my favourite tv shows is The Mentalist. Patrick Jane also drinks tea. :)

Wyliefan
12-20-2011, 08:17 PM
I guess you don't like Miss Marple then. My favourite Agatha Christie of all time is A Murder is Announced, and there is a pivotal scene in a village tea shop. She doesn't quilt, but she knits.


Nope, see, knitting isn't at all the same thing as quilting. If there's knitting, the book is usually okay; if there's quilting, it's almost always gonna be unbearably cutesy-poo.

gkelly
12-20-2011, 08:19 PM
I think there should be a word for the category of mystery set in a specific milieu (profession, etc.) where the protagonist is an amateur sleuth who gets involved and solves the case because of expert insider knowledge. It may involve domestic skills, it may be a small town, but not necessarily. The point is that the protagonist is not a law enforcement professional, public or private.

Prancer
12-20-2011, 08:23 PM
That's why, every so often, I pluck up my courage and post about the dreck I'm reading - in the wild, vain hope that somebody out there is reading similar dreck and is just to shy or intimidated to mention it. :)

I like your posts. I often read things you recommend :).

I don't see these threads as particularly highbrow. Right off the top of my head, it seems to me that the longest discussions we've had have been about Lee Child, Nevada Barr, lots of YA books, and zombies :P. Well, there have been a couple about Ayn Rand and Dickens :scream:.

But if you want a confession, I'll make one--I've been reading Nicola Cornick (http://www.nicolacornick.co.uk/) and Loretta Chase (http://www.lorettachase.com/) for this break. Smut with :lol: dialogue :swoon:.

Also, I read what has to be the weirdest Regency romance novel ever--Phyllida and the Brotherhood of Philander : a Bisexual Regency Romance (http://www.amazon.com/Phyllida-Brotherhood-Philander-Bisexual-Regency/dp/1420869639). I actually started a post about that one, but it ended up being such a :soapbox: that I thought better of it.


So mostly I'm reading recent mysteries. Some of them quite fluffy.

Not bestseller enough or deep enough to be worth mentioning here, but I'll let a fellow FSUer borrow them once I'm done. ;)

I am always in the market for a new mystery. I am not fond of most of the bestsellers :shuffle:, but I am also not at all fond of, say, P.D. James. :shuffle::shuffle: I do like to have a mystery in my mystery and not just a fun character, but a mystery AND a fun character is :swoon:.

PDilemma
12-20-2011, 08:26 PM
That's why, every so often, I pluck up my courage and post about the dreck I'm reading - in the wild, vain hope that somebody out there is reading similar dreck and is just to shy or intimidated to mention it. :)

Even then, I generally try to post the "best" of the dreck - and not the stuff that I devour like potato chips.

Dreck Readers, Unite!!! (And post!)

I had an English professor in college who proclaimed that there was no bad literature - that reading anything from comic books (excuse me, "graphic novels") to cereal boxes to newspapers to best sellers to Shakespeare's sonnets was better than never reading anything at all and that primary and secondary school systems that "forced" students to read only the approved classics did more to kill the love of reading than they did to foster it. I know that with myself the best way to turn me off a book is to tell me that I "should" or "have to" read it.

I was an English major undergrad and taught literature. So I'm supposed to read highbrow stuff. And I used to sometimes. Then I started grad school.

I spent a semester reading serious history at the rate of 300-400 pages a week.

Then break time comes, I go to the library thinking about all the "important" books I've heard about and should read in my precious three weeks for fiction...

And then I search for dreck. Preferably of the chick lit variety. The dreckier the better. Bring it on. :lol:

Prancer
12-20-2011, 08:29 PM
I was an English major undergrad and taught literature. So I'm supposed to read highbrow stuff. And I used to sometimes. Then I started grad school.

Grad school turned me off reading altogether for a couple of years and when I started up again, I read nothing more demanding than Harlequin romances.

Grad school sucks.

PDilemma
12-20-2011, 08:31 PM
Grad school turned me off reading altogether for a couple of years and when I started up again, I read nothing more demanding than Harlequin romances.

Grad school sucks.

Yeah...this semester was rough. I've been done for a week as of tomorrow and still haven't read anything more complex than a webpage. I skimmed a magazine. The dreck I checked out of the library is even too much effort.

Glad it's not just me!

Jenny
12-20-2011, 08:37 PM
I am always in the market for a new mystery. I am not fond of most of the bestsellers :shuffle:, but I am also not at all fond of, say, P.D. James. :shuffle::shuffle: I do like to have a mystery in my mystery and not just a fun character, but a mystery AND a fun character is :swoon:.

The NY Times Book Review just gave PD James new Austenesque book a big thumbs up, saying it really stands above the current fad for extensions, in the style of, based on, etc.

Anyone read it? Death Comes to Pemberly or something like that - extension of P&P, with murder.

gkelly
12-20-2011, 08:37 PM
I am always in the market for a new mystery. I am not fond of most of the bestsellers :shuffle:, but I am also not at all fond of, say, P.D. James. :shuffle::shuffle: I do like to have a mystery in my mystery and not just a fun character, but a mystery AND a fun character is :swoon:.

Not sure "fun" would be a word I'd use -- the most recent book I've read that I'd recommend would be The Heat of the Moon by Sandra Parshall.

Wyliefan
12-20-2011, 08:45 PM
The NY Times Book Review just gave PD James new Austenesque book a big thumbs up, saying it really stands above the current fad for extensions, in the style of, based on, etc.

Anyone read it? Death Comes to Pemberly or something like that - extension of P&P, with murder.

I read it and liked it a lot. It had a few flaws, but on the whole James did a great job with it. Let me know if you want my Goodreads review and I'll PM it to you.

IceAlisa
12-20-2011, 09:02 PM
I would love to read your review, Wyliefan.

Fergus
12-20-2011, 10:46 PM
The new Van Gogh bio by Naifeh & Smith looks really good. :biggrinbo

Hopefully as good as their Jackson Pollock bio!