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dbell1
11-28-2011, 06:44 PM
I picked up "The Night Circus" last night at 10:30 PM and am 200 pages in. What a fabulous book!! :swoon: It's like Alice Hoffman meets Merlin. I'm dreading the end, since I'll have to leave this little black and white fantasy world. And there's already 3 people at work requesting the book. It may not leave me for a bit, I'm thinking I want to re-read it immediately... :shuffle:

PrincessLeppard
11-28-2011, 08:37 PM
At one a.m. last night, I finished The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness. I think I liked it, but I do have a problem with problems being prolonged due to "pride." Seriously, get over yourself. One of the very first problems in the book would've been averted had the main character not been all :drama: and had listened to his guardian. (I realize the author needed the first problem to happen. But there are others ways for it to do so.)

I also can't stand it when animals are killed off for the sake of adding drama. The dog didn't have to die.

It's the first book of a trilogy. I have the second now. I hope the third book isn't as bad as Mockingjay. :yikes:

Prancer
11-28-2011, 08:49 PM
It's the first book of a trilogy. I have the second now. I hope the third book isn't as bad as Mockingjay. :yikes:

For what it's worth, my son read the trilogy and liked all three books.

Wyliefan
11-28-2011, 10:40 PM
Goodreads has The Night Circus up against Jasper Fforde's One of Our Thursdays Is Missing for best fantasy novel of 2011. (Along with some other titles I'm not familiar with.) I ask you, HOW is a person supposed to choose between those two?? :drama:

Cachoo
11-28-2011, 11:54 PM
I wanted to use my Amazon points on something I was really looking forward to and Charles Finch just released his latest mystery "A Burial at Sea" and now I can't wait to read it. I used the the additional points to buy collected stories by David Foster Wallace called "Oblivion." Now that Thanksgiving is over it is time to dig in (to books instead of food.)

Nomad
11-29-2011, 02:31 AM
Goodreads has The Night Circus up against Jasper Fforde's One of Our Thursdays Is Missing for best fantasy novel of 2011. (Along with some other titles I'm not familiar with.) I ask you, HOW is a person supposed to choose between those two?? :drama:

Don't. Read both.

I did a lousy job of packing my books. All I've left myself is The End of Empire: Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome and a Library of America Henry James anthology. Late Henry James, of course. I think I need to go to Barnes & Noble tomorrow.

flyingsit
11-29-2011, 02:45 AM
At the moment I seem to be drawn to nonfiction stories of life at the edges. I am reading both Into the Wild and More, Now, Again which is a memoir of drug addiction by Elizabeth Wurtzel, the author of Prozac Nation.

galaxygirl
11-29-2011, 03:57 AM
I'm about 60 pages into The Hunger Games and am enjoying it, but I think I enjoyed Divergent better though it's not as well written.


Don't. Read both.

I did a lousy job of packing my books. All I've left myself is The End of Empire: Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome and a Library of America Henry James anthology. Late Henry James, of course. I think I need to go to Barnes & Noble tomorrow.

I'm planning to read The Wings of the Dove next year. I've read both The Turn of the Screw and Daisy Miller so I should be up to the challenge, right?!?!! :yikes:

Nomad
11-29-2011, 05:48 AM
...
I'm planning to read The Wings of the Dove next year. I've read both The Turn of the Screw and Daisy Miller so I should be up to the challenge, right?!?!! :yikes:

I have no real problem with early/mid Henry James. It's the stuff he wrote after The Tragic Muse that I've struggled with. I thought his prose style became overly-elaborate and needlessly indirect. But that's just me. YMMV.

IceAlisa
11-29-2011, 05:55 AM
I have no real problem with early/mid Henry James. It's the stuff he wrote after The Tragic Muse that I've struggled with. I thought his prose style became overly-elaborate and needlessly indirect. But that's just me. YMMV.

It's not just you. How many paragraphs can one sentence last? I love early-middle James as well.

IceAlisa
11-29-2011, 10:22 PM
Started Donna Tartt's The Secret History--and how refreshing it is to encounter well-crafted prose after the substandard efforts of Ms. Gee. A very confident writer, this Donna Tartt.

Lara
11-29-2011, 10:36 PM
Robert K. Massie's new Catherine the Great bio is fantastic. :swoon:

Ooh, I'd like to check that out - I got Nicholas and Alexandra years ago and really enjoyed it.

immoimeme
11-29-2011, 11:27 PM
I read John Grisham's latest and see, it was so memorable I can't even remember the title :P

Then I read Stephen King's 11/22/63 which was actually a love story, but you don't know that til the end....uh,except that I just told you that (oh well LOL)

I'm going to read "Nightwoods" by Charles Frazier (he wrote Cold Mountain if you don't remember)

Holley Calmes
11-29-2011, 11:41 PM
A couple of James' on my horizon. I had my independent mom and pop favorite bookstore order the Peter James series for me. They had to get them from Great Britain, and it was quite a wait, but I'm sure worth it. I also saw PD James new "Pride and Prejudice" sequel murder mystery. I actually like PD James, although I avoid any Austen "sequels." But James might be worth it.

Also read a couple of Deanna Raybourn. I got halfway through the first one and almost stopped because it was just too dumb and bad romance novelish, but it got better. Enough for me to read the second one and probably will read all of them.

Also went through a couple of Mike Connelly which were, yeah, good, but I couldn't get past the unrelenting masculinity. Ha!

mkats
11-30-2011, 12:24 AM
I just finished Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay. My gripe with stories that jump back and forth between time and characters is that they have to be roughly equally enthralling, otherwise you keep hurrying through one section trying to get back to the previous character's story. Sarah's tale as a child in 1942 is absolutely brilliantly written; Julia in 2002 is uninspiring, weak, spineless, ...yeah. I don't usually do WWII books, but this one was not too bad if you can tune out all the modern-day soap opera plots. :P