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View Full Version : An FSU Without a Book Thread is Like an FS Event Without Snark



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Marge_Simpson
10-15-2011, 05:18 AM
I'm halfway through "A Beautiful Blue Death" by Charles Finch and I'm loving it so far.

Erin
10-16-2011, 09:52 PM
Oh, I just finished The Forgotten Garden too! Loved it but had the same feeling as you as far as jumping goes - I got disappointed every time Nell came back, I liked Eliza's parts best!

I read this book earlier this year and I had the same reaction - the Eliza parts were really strong, but the rest were not and it made you just want to stay with Eliza. The Eliza parts reminded me a little bit of The Thirteenth Tale, which is probably why I liked them best.

Just coming back from vacation, where I got a lot of reading done on planes and trains. Finished The Help - pretty average. Glad I read it to see what all the fuss was about, and a nice break to have a book that I could rip right through, but was looking forward to getting into something meatier after. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet accomplished that - excellent book about a Chinese-American boy and Japanese-American girl during WWII in Seattle and the impact of the Japanese internment camps, which I hadn't known much about before that.

I also read two excellent non-fictions - both auto-biographies, as it happens. The first was Stolen Innocence about Elissa Wall, who was part of the FLDS polygamist sect and testified against Warren Jeffs (he was convicted of two counts of being an accomplice to her rape, although the verdict has been overturned...he may or may not be re-tried). Fascinating story. From what I've seen of clips of her on TV, I'm guessing the collaborator had a heavy hand in the writing, but to some extent the story speaks for itself.

The last one that I'm almost through is Kathryn Bertine's As Good As Gold, who was the former skater turned triathlete turned cyclist who worked for ESPN while trying to get to the 2008 Olympics (which didn't happen, but it appears she's still aiming for 2012). Much of the book draws heavily on her ESPN articles, but I enjoyed them the first time around and there are some new stories in the book. Kept me entertained for more than half of an 8 hour flight, so good enough for me.

Next up is Major Pettigrew's Last Stand based on earlier recommendations from this thread.

Matryeshka
10-16-2011, 09:58 PM
Finished Rick Riordan's Son of Neptune...finally. I don't like Hazel and Frank as much as Tyson and Annabeth, but I do like them OK.

I need to go back and re-read some parts from the first series; there were some references to it in this book that I just didn't remember. I'm really interested in where he goes with the series--he's got a vehicle now he can do a lot with. It's hard for me to believe this is this same author of the Kane Chronicles, as those books are just dreadful.

rfisher
10-16-2011, 10:07 PM
Original Sin by Beth McMullen: funny. Sally Sin is a wife, mother and spy. This is the first of what will be a series.

merrywidow
10-16-2011, 10:12 PM
"The Codex" a great "can't put it down" adventure novel by Douglas Preston.

Prancer
10-16-2011, 11:07 PM
Original Sin by Beth McMullen: funny. Sally Sin is a wife, mother and spy. This is the first of what will be a series.

Is it any good? I got that one as an e-book freebie, but I haven't gotten around to reading it yet.

rfisher
10-16-2011, 11:09 PM
Is it any good? I got that one as an e-book freebie, but I haven't gotten around to reading it yet.

It's funny. She's a spy who decides to quit and get married and have a kid. Well, you can guess how well that works. There are a lot of backstories in this book that explains her past leading up to the action that will set up future books.

dbell1
10-17-2011, 03:46 PM
I'm in love with "The Dovekeepers" by Alice Hoffman. Have always wanted to know more about Masada and she's one of my favorite authors, so it's a win-win for me. I find myself wanting to take a day off work just to read. :shuffle:

I'm now dying to buy Alison Weir's book about Mary Boleyn. Anyone read it yet? It's called "The Mistress of Kings". Figure it has to be better than 'the other Boleyn' garbage (and that horrid movie)...

Jenny
10-17-2011, 04:12 PM
Figure it has to be better than 'the other Boleyn' garbage (and that horrid movie)...

Did you ever see this version (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0357392/) of the movie? It was before the Hollywood version, and it pulled me in enough to launch a Tudor obsession that would last several years and dozens of other books.

Interesting that it stars Natascha McElhone - I love her subsequent work in the movie Laurel Canyon and in Californication - didn't realize it was her back then!

dbell1
10-18-2011, 01:00 AM
Hmm, never heard of that version. Might have to go hunt down a version. I've been Tudor obsessed since I was a preteen. :lol:

Artemis@BC
10-18-2011, 05:47 PM
Well, I finally slogged my way through The Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman, which was given to me by a friend. I know this book has a huge following, and my friend called it "mind-blowing," but the only word I can use to describe it is awful. I'm not a big fan of "spiritual journey self-help" books anyway, but this one was particularly bad. The "characters" (supposedly real people, tho he's a bit coy about that) were very unlikable, I didn't believe Dan's growth/transformation (he was only marginally less self-absorbed at the end than he was at the beginning), and the writing was really, really, really bad.

It might have been slightly better if I'd read it when I was a teenager or in my early twenties, but the over-riding messages of "if you want to be happy, just be happy," and "don't focus on what others think of you," are just so friggin' obvious. Suffice it to say that I won't be running out to read any of the sequels -- or any other books this friend recommends!

oleada
10-24-2011, 05:36 AM
I have no time to read for fun these days, but I just added a big stack of books to my to-read list and I was wondering what people in here had read them and what their thoughts were about them :D (though some haven't even come out yet...)

The Little Bride, by
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides
The History of Love by Nicole Krauss
Van Gogh: The Life by Stephen Naifeh
The Little Bride by Anna Solomon

I loved Jeffrey Eugenides first two books and can't wait to read this one.

Civic
10-24-2011, 07:43 AM
I just finished a Lynda LaPlante novel, The Red Dahlia. LaPlante is best known as the writer of the Prime Suspect television series that starred Helen Mirren. The Red Dahlia features another female detective, Anna Travis. It was good but I didn't find Anna Travis as nearly interesting as Jane Tennison.

TygerLily
10-24-2011, 02:40 PM
The History of Love by Nicole KraussI loved this book! Her more recent novel (Great House) was interesting but no History of Love.

attyfan
10-24-2011, 03:14 PM
... I'm now dying to buy Alison Weir's book about Mary Boleyn. Anyone read it yet? It's called "The Mistress of Kings". Figure it has to be better than 'the other Boleyn' garbage (and that horrid movie)...

"TOBG" isn't serious history; even Warnicke (the historian cited by Gregory as "supporting" the book) has disclaimed it. Any Tudor fans interested in reading the Mary Boleyn book may be interested in reading this review of it:

http://www.theanneboleynfiles.com/15586/mary-boleyn-by-alison-weir-book-review/